Frank Broadstreet CARVELL

CARVELL, The Hon. Frank Broadstreet, P.C., K.C., LL.B.

Personal Data

Party
Unionist (Liberal)
Constituency
Victoria--Carleton (New Brunswick)
Birth Date
August 14, 1862
Deceased Date
August 9, 1924
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frank_Broadstreet_Carvell
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=80f4de9d-1b1a-4db1-93cf-9cb7b9b63dd4&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
businessman, lawyer

Parliamentary Career

November 3, 1904 - September 17, 1908
LIB
  Carleton (New Brunswick)
October 26, 1908 - July 29, 1911
LIB
  Carleton (New Brunswick)
September 21, 1911 - October 6, 1917
LIB
  Carleton (New Brunswick)
December 17, 1917 - August 1, 1919
UNI L
  Victoria--Carleton (New Brunswick)
  • Minister of Public Works (October 13, 1917 - August 1, 1919)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 1293 of 1294)


April 10, 1905

Mr. CARVELL.

No ; it depends on whether the municipal council feel that it ought to be paid.

Topic:   CRIMINAL CODE, 1892-AMENDMENT.
Full View Permalink

March 6, 1905

Mr. F. B. CARVELL (Carleton, N.B.) moved :

For copies of all memoranda, papers or documents submitted to the government of Canada on behalf of the several provinces of Canada, urging a readjustment of the provincial subsidies ; together with any replies thereto ; and all correspondence between the government of Canada, or any member thereof, and the governments of the several provinces, or any members thereof, relating to such readjustment.

He said : In moving this motion, I presume that I am drawing the attention of the House to a subject which is not new either to it or the country. But it is one which is of great importance to the great body of the electors, especially from a provincial standpoint. It is a matter of common knowledge that when confederation was consummated in 1807. the revenues which the provinces derived from customs

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   PROVINCIAL SUBSIDIES.
Full View Permalink

February 16, 1905

Mr. CARVELL.

What would the costs amount to ? Perhaps a couple of dollars iu the police court.

no injustice will be done to anybody, but that great benefit will be done to the farmer who. purchases seed, and in the end we shall have better seed and better agriculture. Therefore in my humble opinion this legislation is in the proper direction and should pass this House.

Topic:   INSPECTION AND SALE OF SEEDS.
Full View Permalink

February 16, 1905

Mr. CARVELL.

give u ceruucate oi rue seen ne sens, because he is not in a position to say whether the seed is pure or not ; but, on the other hand, he tells us that the farmer who buys from his neighbour is protected because he knows the kind of seed his neighbour is growing. If the man who owns the farm does not know "whether his seed is pure or not, how can his neighbour? The discussion has hinged principally on grass and clover seed. That does not apply to the farmers in my section, because they do not grow it. We are more interested in cereals. We have flat land surrounding the river, which grows giain and, back of that rising ground which is good for pasture ; but they do not gow sufficient grain to feed the stock which the dairy industry requires. I give the minister credit for being a great help in the way of introducing silos and other improvements, but I am not quite sure about the effect of this Bill. If a man from the highlands comes down to the level to buy seed grain, I understand the minister to say that the farmer from whom he buys is not bound to give a certificate that that grain is pure unless he is asked to do so. But if he is asked to do so and is not in a position to give such a certificate, then he loses the sale of his seed. I am not making any factious oppo-

sition, but would be glad to join hands with the hon. minister in doing anything which would curtail the sale of impure seeds, but I would like to be in a position to know whether this measure is workable.

Topic:   INSPECTION AND SALE OF SEEDS.
Full View Permalink

February 16, 1905

Mr. CARYELL.

I have listened to'the discussion this afternoon on this question, and, while not a practical farmer, I represent a farming constituency, and I have observed that the discussion has been nearly altogether from the standpoint of the seed merchant and to some extent from the standpoint of the province of Ontario. I have heard two or three speeches from gentlemen from the west, but not a word as yet from the maritime provinces. I would therefore like to discuss this measure for a few moments from the standpoint of a maritime member, and one of the representatives of the maritime farmers. I can assure you that there is no question of so much importance to the maritime farmers to-day as the seed question. We have attempted for some years to improve the quality of the seeds we have to use. We cannot tell why, but it is a fact that we do not raise our own grass seeds to any great extent in the maritime provinces. We are compelled to purchase them mostly from the province of Ontario, and it seems almost impossible for a farmer to get a good quality of grass seeds. He can prepare his land for a crop of wheat or any other grain, and the crop will be fairly free from weeds ; but the next year after he uses Ontario grass seed, he will probably have more sorrel in his crop than timothy or clover. Our farmers have taken various courses in their efforts to overcome this difficulty. They have banded themselves together in societies and have imported the seed direct; our merchants have tried to get good seed for them ; but no matter what we do, it seems impossible to get good results, Now, it seems to me that this Bill is exactly in the right direction. It has been described here this afternoon, I think by the hon. member for Brantford (Mr. Cockshutt), as a drastic measure ; I think he almost: went so far as to say it was vicious legislation, and he did say that it was

legislation unprecedented in the annals of any civilized country. Well, Sir, if this Bill *will be the means of overcoming some of the difficulties under which the farmers of this country are suffering in connection with the purchase of their grass seed, then Canada will have the distinction of being the first civilized country which has tried to grapple with this question. I cannot see any difficulty in the way of working it out. It seems to me that it, would be nonsense to appoint a staff of inspectors to enforce the Act. If it is going to be useful to the farmers, they will find the means of working it out. If it become law. we in the province of New Brunswick will do so, whether they will in the province of Ontario or not. We will simply get some farmer to take a sample of the grass seed which he has purchased from his local merchant, and have it tested, and if it does not come up to the requirements, we will lay an information against the local merchant and see where the trouble is. You may say that this will be a hardship on an innocent merchant. By no means, because by subsection 2 of section S, if the merchant be able to show that the package has not been broken, and that he has purchased it in good faith, and gives the name of the merchant in Montreal or Toronto from whom he has bought the seed, the onus will fall back upon the latter.

Topic:   INSPECTION AND SALE OF SEEDS.
Full View Permalink