Follin Horace PICKEL

PICKEL, Follin Horace, M.D., C.M.

Personal Data

Party
Conservative (1867-1942)
Constituency
Brome--Missisquoi (Quebec)
Birth Date
March 2, 1866
Deceased Date
December 21, 1949
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Follin_Horace_Pickel
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=7ee05af9-6443-4ba1-8021-b7ee4cf6cd21&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
farmer, physician

Parliamentary Career

July 28, 1930 - August 14, 1935
CON
  Brome--Missisquoi (Quebec)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 20 of 21)


April 23, 1931

Mr. PICKEL:

It is not butter I am speaking of. The farmers are taking their milk and cream into the cities, and the curtailment of the service will work a hardship not only on the farmers but on the city residents if the farmers are unable to get their produce to market. Milk and cream are perishable products, and a tri-weekly service will not answer very well. I have already spoken to the minister with respect to these services, and he has promised to use his influence. I have also communicated with the Canadian Pacific Railway, but I have not heard from them.

Topic:   CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS
Subtopic:   INCREASE IN NUMBER OF DIRECTORS FROM FIFTEEN TO SEVENTEEN
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April 22, 1931

Mr. PICKEL (for Mr. Lawson):

For a copy of all correspondence including letters, telegrams, memoranda, and other documents, and excerpts from minutes of meetings, and/or memoranda of such meetings made by anyone or more commissioners, of the Civil Service Commission, or of any firm, corporation or department or official thereof with such commission, or any one of them relative to one Margaret Gougeon, formerly employed by the postmaster at New Toronto, Ontario, and subsequently appointed temporarily by such commission in the Post Office Department, Toronto postal district.

Topic:   MARGARET GOUGEON
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April 22, 1931

Mr. PICKEL:

For a copy of all letters, telegrams, reports, memoranda, charges of complaint and all other documents, in possession of any department of the government, regarding the dismissal of Francis Fulford Fyles as collector of customs and excise at the port of Abercorn, in the month of January, 1927.

Topic:   DISMISSAL OF FRANCIS FULFORD FYLES
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April 16, 1931

Mr. PICKEL:

Mr. Speaker, I deny that statement totally, and I ask the hon. gentleman to withdraw it.

Topic:   SPEECH FROM THE THRONE
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON THE ADDRESS IN REPLY
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March 17, 1931

Mr. PICKEL:

I have. Previously the

westerners got good prices; they were doing well; but we in the eastern townships have been suffering for seven years, and we are pretty hard hit. The wheat situation is very serious. The people in the east are sympathetic and they are quite willing to do anything that can be done to remedy conditions in the west. I cannot say what should be done, but I am ready to support any measures for the purpose of alleviating the conditions of the western farmer.

When we speak of agriculture in this house, the eastern dairy farmer never enters the mind of hon. members. It is the grain growers of the west who are meant, and this has been so for a long time. About the only information the majority of the members have of the condition of the eastern farmer is what is obtained from the milkman who, from the excessive price he is charging for his milk, spreads the propaganda that the farmer is robbing him. He does not at the same time tell the consumer that while the farmer is getting one dollar, the milkman is getting three dollars. I ask hon. members to consider seriously the position of the eastern dairy farmer. During the last six years, since 1925, the experimental and demonstration farms of this country have shown us that it costs forty cents to produce a pound of butter with bran at S30 a ton and middlings at $38 a ton; but with bran at S40 a ton and middlings at $50 a ton, which we had to pay for four or five of those years, the cost of production was over fifty cents a pound, and the farmers in the dairy section, by remaining in the business, lost ten cents on every pound of butter they produced. Our farmers would have been better off if they had closed up their farms in 1925 and waited-

Topic:   PRICE TREND
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