Follin Horace PICKEL

PICKEL, Follin Horace, M.D., C.M.

Personal Data

Party
Conservative (1867-1942)
Constituency
Brome--Missisquoi (Quebec)
Birth Date
March 2, 1866
Deceased Date
December 21, 1949
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Follin_Horace_Pickel
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=7ee05af9-6443-4ba1-8021-b7ee4cf6cd21&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
farmer, physician

Parliamentary Career

July 28, 1930 - August 14, 1935
CON
  Brome--Missisquoi (Quebec)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 1 of 21)


June 26, 1954

Mr. Pickup:

"It could be that she might become a public charge, or that she lacked education, or because of political affiliations.

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF CITIZENSHIP AND IMMIGRATION
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July 3, 1935

Mr. PICKEL:

On May 1 Canadian cheese in London was worth fourteen and a quarter cents while New Zealand cheese was worth only eleven and a half cents per pound. Does that say anything?

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OP AGRICULTURE
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July 3, 1935

Mr. PICKEL:

It is a question of getting

rid of our surplus. Since I have been in this house I have done everything I could

to get ;the government to encourage the manufacture of cheese and1 I think this is the best piece of legislation which has been brought forward in the past five years. We should try to -interest the farmer in the manufacture of cheese so that he will be making an article which he can get rid of at the best price in the world.

Another reason why the farmer should divert his milk from butter production is the procedure followed by city distributors. During the summer producing season these men will pay the farmer 18, 19 and 20 cents a pound far his butter and they then use the cold storage warehouses which are subsidized by the government to store that 'butter until next winter when they will get 30 or 36 cents per pound for it. In the west they have been buying eggs all spring at 5, 8 and 10 cents a dozen, and next December we shall be paying 45 and 50 cents per dozen for the same eggs. The cold storages were built, presumably, for the benefit of the farmer, but they have worked' -out to the advantage of the distributor. They have not done the farmer any good; they have done him damage. Let me tell the -committee something of the efforts that were made in the eastern townships a number of years ago to encourage the making of cheese. It was in the day of the late Sidney Fisher, Minister af Agriculture, and through the efforts of one man in that section, Mr. Foster, we had a cheese board established, one of the largest in the dominion. Everything was working nicely and we had legislation passed by which the distributors in the city had to come to the factory and examine the cheese and grade it at the factory, leaving an accepted cheque for it before it was m'oved. The minute that was done the distributors began to fight it. Fifteen or twenty of them would come to Cowansville every Saturday and meet the salesmen at the board, and they would feast them, wine them and dine them and then take them round the comer and say, "If you will sell off the board we will give you so much more." The farmers fell for that and inside of two years there was no longer a cheese board.

The farmers individually are the brightest people we have in the country, but collectively they are the greatest lot of nincompoops who ever wore shoe leather.

Mr. BROWN1: That is why they fell for

New Zealand butter.

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OP AGRICULTURE
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July 3, 1935

Mr. PICKEL:

I did not catch what the

hon. gentleman said.

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OP AGRICULTURE
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July 3, 1935

Mr. PICKEL:

You are dreaming.

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OP AGRICULTURE
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