Marcel DANIS

DANIS, The Hon. Marcel, P.C., B.A., M.A., LL.B.

Personal Data

Party
Progressive Conservative
Constituency
Verchères (Quebec)
Birth Date
October 22, 1943
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marcel_Danis
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=7dcf3dd2-39d7-4162-a494-1c4ca12ab718&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
lawyer, professor of law

Parliamentary Career

September 4, 1984 - October 1, 1988
PC
  Verchères (Quebec)
  • Deputy Speaker and Chair of Committees of the Whole of the House of Commons (November 5, 1984 - February 22, 1990)
November 21, 1988 - September 8, 1993
PC
  Verchères (Quebec)
  • Deputy Speaker and Chair of Committees of the Whole of the House of Commons (November 5, 1984 - February 22, 1990)
  • Minister of State (Youth) (February 23, 1990 - April 20, 1991)
  • Minister of State (Fitness and Amateur Sport) (February 23, 1990 - April 20, 1991)
  • Progressive Conservative Party Deputy House Leader (February 23, 1990 - April 20, 1991)
  • Deputy Leader of the Government in the House of Commons (February 23, 1990 - April 20, 1991)
  • Minister of Labour (April 21, 1991 - June 24, 1993)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 5 of 1587)


March 19, 1993

Hon. Marcel Danis (Minister of Labour):

Madam Speaker, on behalf of the President of the Treasury Board, I would like to answer the question by my hon. friend.

March 19, 1993

Oral Questions

She knows, and the Prime Minister has stated it on a number of occasions, what the policy of this government is concerning sexual harassment. It is one of zero tolerance.

I support that. In a certain time in my prior life, I was responsible for implementing sexual harassment guidelines at the University of Montreal. I know what it is and I support the policy. If my hon. friend has any particular case where she feels something has been done which is not fair, she should bring it to our attention.

I can tell my hon. friend because she speaks in generalities that if she has questions or cases, she can bring them to our attention and I will transmit them to the minister responsible for Treasury Board.

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   SEXUAL HARASSMENT
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March 16, 1993

Hon. Marcel Danis (Minister of Labour):

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to inform the hon. member that it will not be long.

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   BILL C-7
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March 11, 1993

Hon. Marcel Danis (Minister of Labour):

Mr. Speaker, I think it would be most inappropriate for me to answer the question as put by my hon. friend when now in Yellowknife an industry inquiry is under way. The CLRB, the Canadian Labour Relations Board, is there. To ask me now what I will do when the decision is made is totally inappropriate, and I cannot answer that question.

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   THE ENVIRONMENT
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March 11, 1993

Hon. Marcel Danis (Minister of Labour):

Mr. Speaker, the reason I have a tan is probably because I spend a lot of time in the House of Commons with these lights, more than the hon. member does.

The issue raised by my hon. friend is a most serious one and of course the government recognizes it.

March 11, 1993

Privilege

I must tell my hon. friend that I met with the parties in this dispute a number of times. I suggested to them that the best way to end this dispute would be for the parties to agree to binding arbitration.

The parties have refused. As a result, we appointed what we felt were the best mediators possible in British Columbia and the Northwest Territories, Mr. Munroe and Mr. Reddy. They met with the parties. They prepared the report. After that was unsuccessful, I then went ahead with the appointment of an industrial inquiry commission which is now sitting. On top of that, there has been an additional request by a new union which has asked to be accredited. The Canadian Labour Relations Board is looking into that.

Therefore, labour department has done everything that is possible. I hope that after the recommendations of the industrial inquiry commission we will get a peaceful resolution of this dispute.

-k -k -k

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   THE ENVIRONMENT
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February 23, 1993

Hon. Marcel Danis (Minister of Labour) moved

that Bill C-101, an act to amend the Canada Labour Code and the Public Service Staff Relations Act, be read the second time and referred to a legislative committee in the Human Resources envelope.

He said: Mr. Speaker, I rise today to address hon. members on the second reading of federal labour legislation which will reduce administrative and cost burdens, increase efficiency and competitiveness and enhance labour-management co-operation.

The proposed amendments to the Canada Labour Code are in a balanced package. They benefit employers, employees and government and are also timely. With the

support of this House we can move forward together to increase our investment in people and the ability of Canadian enterprises to be more competitive.

The majority of the amendments I am proposing relate to federal labour standards contained in the Canada Labour Code. These proposals were developed over a two-year period in partnership with federally regulated employer and employee representatives, the very parties affected by the changes. Some 700,000 working Canadians will benefit from these changes to federal labour standards.

The issues addressed in this proposal include streamlining modifications to standards, clarifying the relationship between minimum labour standards and collective agreements, more effective collection of unpaid wages, provision of wage and employment protection for workers injured on the job, greater flexibility in the timing of parental leave and maternity related reassignment.

I am also proposing the addition of a provision to the Canada Labour Code and the Public Service Staff Relations Act. These amendments will serve the public interest by providing an additional mechanism which could assist in the settlement of collective bargaining disputes.

I will give a few examples of the ways in which the proposed amendments to the Canada Labour Code will benefit employers and employees. Streamlining the procedure for modifying labour standards such as duration of work, annual leave and statutory holidays will benefit the employer.

Clarification of federal powers concerning wage and unemployment protection for workers injured on the job and the relationship between minimum labour standards and collective agreements will help save time and money and prevent overlap and duplication.

Pregnant and nursing workers will have the right to request reassignment, a change in their tasks or even a period of leave if their health is at stake. Employees injured on the job will benefit under provisions that guarantee wage protection, maintenance of social benefits and resumption of employment. New parents will be able to take parental leave at the time they see fit, during the first year in which they have an infant in their care.

February 23, 1993

All these changes clearly benefit Canadian workers and testify to the federal government's commitment to investing in the human resources of this country.

These changes will greatly enhance the harmonization of labour legislation in this country. The Canada Labour Code will be more compatible with provincial labour standards will be increased, and employees across Canada will be entitled to similar levels of wages and benefits.

As I said at the beginning of my speech, these very substantial changes are intended to streamline federal labour legislation and help Canada prepare for the challenges of economic globalization. I would now like to offer some examples that will illustrate the tremendous progress we will all be able to make as a result of this bill.

As an example let me briefly describe our amendments with regard to collective agreements and minimum labour standards. These modifications will exempt unionized work places from annual vacation, general holidays, bereavement leave or minimum wage standards where the collective agreement meets or exceeds the legislated standard.

Currently the complainant, subject to such a collective agreement, may call on both the grievance process and Labour Canada for redress. The new amendments will ensure that only the collective agreement prevails for those employees who have access to a third party grievance process. This will eliminate unnecessary duplication.

At the outset I referred to proposed changes in the industrial relations area of the Canada Labour Code and the Public Service Staff Relations Act. The changes will protect the public interest by providing an additional mechanism which could assist in the settlement of collective bargaining disputes in federal jurisdiction. These amendments will allow a vote to be directed among employees in a bargaining unit on an employer's last offer when the public interest is affected.

Housekeeping amendments to the Canada Labour Code will also be made to redress certain discrepancies between the English and French texts. This will ensure clarity and uniformity in the provisions.

In conclusion, I think it is clear from the outline I have provided hon. members that the amendments before this House will have an extensive and beneficial impact on efficiency in the work place while promoting greater co-operation between employer and employee.

Government Orders

These amendments will also help propel Canada into a more progressive economic climate and foster a more equitable and harmonious work place environment. I trust that with the support of both Houses and the support of my colleagues from the opposition parties we can get this piece of legislation through the House quickly.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   CANADA LABOUR CODE
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