Louis-Prudent-Alexandre ROBICHAUD

ROBICHAUD, Louis-Prudent-Alexandre, B.A., LL.B.

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
Kent (New Brunswick)
Birth Date
January 25, 1890
Deceased Date
March 17, 1971
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louis-Prudent-Alexandre_Robichaud
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=7c81af1f-bca1-45d6-a248-3db1d7f90609&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
barrister

Parliamentary Career

October 14, 1935 - January 25, 1940
LIB
  Kent (New Brunswick)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 29 of 30)


February 26, 1937

Mr. ROBICHAUD:

Mr. Chairman, the

minister has referred to section five as conferring wide powers upon the appeal court. I can understand that this court should have wide powers and be free from political interference, but I cannot understand why they should be empowered to brush aside what would appear to be well known British legal procedure and jurisprudence. As I understood the hon. member for York South (Mr. Lawson), when a man has established his claim before a commission quorum he is reasonably assured of his pension, but many appeals from the quorum tribunals are reversed by the appeal court. I know that many men in my constituency have established their cases before the quorum tribunal, but when the government appealed to the appeal court, which did not have the advantage of hearing the witnesses- a procedure which to my mind is contrary to every rule of British jurisprudence-the appeal was allowed.

I know of one man who was in the trenches for three and a half years. He did not receive a scratch, but he is one of those burnt-out cases. He is a physical wreck and is absolutely unable to earn his own living. As you know, we have no relief in New Brunswick at the present time and the condition of this man and his family is absolutely pitiful. His claim was allowed by a quorum of the commission but it was disallowed by the appeal court. It seems to me that something should be done for cases like this. The minister has stated that where cases have been disallowed by the quorum, an appeal could be taken to the appeal court. But in this case the claim was allowed by the quorum and appealed by the government. I think the law should be changed as it is hard to convince the man on the street that it is being fairly administered. This is especially so, when they see men who are apparently in the pink of condition getting large pensions.

I know of other similar cases but I shall not cite them this evening. I know of cases where men were received into the army as physically fit, and yet were demobilized for medical unfitness. Surely if they were fit when they went into the army and unfit when they came out, their unfitness must be due to their service. If the doctors made a mistake in the first place, then the government should be estopped from claiming that the man's disabilities dated back prior to enlistment. If the doctors had not their eyes open and did not do their work properly, I think the government should suffer the consequences.

Supply-Pensions and National Health

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF PENSIONS AND NATIONAL HEALTH
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April 24, 1936

Mr. ROBICHAUD:

The statement has been made that with a view to increasing postal revenues there should be an increase in postage rates. I cannot agree with that suggestion. In my opinion the best way to increase the revenues of the post office is to reduce postage rates and give us the penny postage which we had after 1896 and again after 1921. I hope this government will give us that, for it has been proved in the past that the lower rate brought in a greater revenue. The same applies to post office boxes. Some years ago, in my town at any rate, the charge for the smaller box was SI and for the larger $1.50, and the rates were increased to S2 and S3 respectively, but instead of the revenue increasing it decreased and half the boxes are not used. What is the use of having boxes if the people are not using them? After all, the Post Office department is running a public service and in my opinion we are all wrong in increasing rates if we think this will result in increased revenues. This is true of customs tariffs; whenever you reduce the tariff you get an increased revenue and vice versa. I urge the minister to take this suggestion into serious consideration with his colleagues and give us the penny postage. The people are waiting for it.

Topic:   POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT
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March 18, 1936

Mr. ROBICHAUD:

Hon. gentlemen object that we have accorded a greater reduction in duties than the United States has done. It seems to me that their argument proves that we are wiser and know better than the Americans do what is good for us.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CANADA-UNITED STATES TRADE AGREEMENT
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March 12, 1936

Mr. ROBICHAUD:

What quantity of

oysters do we import from the United States?

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CANADA-UNITED STATES TRADE AGREEMENT
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March 12, 1936

Mr. ROBICHAUD:

Personally I should

like to see an absolute embargo on the entry into Canada of the bluepoint so-called oyster, not because of competition-I am not afraid of competition-but because they are a misrepresentation and a fraud upon our famous Buctouche and Aldouane oysters. They are really not oysters at all. They do not taste *like oysters. They look more like quahaugs or clams, and when people eat them they say, "If those are oysters we won't buy any more." They are therefore injurious to our Buctouche and Al'diouane oysters.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CANADA-UNITED STATES TRADE AGREEMENT
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