Alexandre Joseph DOUCET

DOUCET, Alexandre Joseph

Personal Data

Party
Conservative (1867-1942)
Constituency
Kent (New Brunswick)
Birth Date
November 1, 1880
Deceased Date
July 28, 1951
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alexandre_Joseph_Doucet
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=7c80f771-ca25-4628-8355-ae46ed1f9087&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
farmer

Parliamentary Career

December 20, 1923 - September 5, 1925
CON
  Kent (New Brunswick)
October 29, 1925 - July 2, 1926
CON
  Kent (New Brunswick)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 81 of 82)


March 14, 1924

Mr. DOUCET:

Would the hon. gentleman recognize the writing if he saw it?

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March 14, 1924

Mr. DOUCET:

Now, Mr. Speaker, in

view of all these things-

Mr. ARCHAMBAULT: Will the hon.

member allow me a question?

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March 14, 1924

Mr. DOUCET:

The present Minister of

Justice. I ask every fair-minded gentleman in this House whether the fact that a constituency returns to parliament a candidate who happens to be a member of the opposition should be a sufficient justification for a cabinet minister refusing to be interviewed. Now,

I want to quote from the Regina Leader of December 17. The Leader I understand is an important newspaper that advocates the same policies as my hon. friends opposite. Dealing with these promises made by hon. gentlemen opposite and by Mr. Veniot this paper says editorially that the government has no right to barter public moneys for party support.

-which is what Hon. Mr. Copp seems to have attempted in the present campaign.

The paper has no hesitation in saying that the government candidate should be defeated at the polls and has no intention of condoning this conduct on the part of the present government as the practice is absolutely indefensible. Then referring to the Minister of Marine (Mr. Cardin) at Buctouche it says that the hon. gentleman appeals for unity between the French Canadians and the Acadians -to secure the realization of legitimate aspirations. The doctrines of the Liberal party were always the same in all the provinces in 1911, 1917 and 1921. He'stated, "Premier King deserved credit for being a candidate in North York in 1917, while Doucet's friends had sent soldiers into his riding to create trouble at his meetings."

I have quoted from a Liberal newspaper; let me read somethihg else from the press. The following is a press despatch:

Never again as long as he was Minister of Marine and Fisheries, he declared solemnly, would there be a single Royal Canadian Mounted policeman sent into Kent to enforce fishery regulations.

Never in all the political history of Kent county was there such an open and unblushing attempt to blind eyes of the electorate to the sins of the government of the day by means of promises. The extension of the Moncton and Buctouche branch of the Canadian National railways to Richibucto, a bait that has been dangled before the eyes of Kent County electors by Grit politicians time after time, only to be thrown in the discard just as soon as the votes were counted, was again trotted out as an undertaking that would be carried to completion provided the government candidate was returned on the 20th.

I have here a copy of a letter sent by a friend of mine in Kent county to a Liberal friend outside the county. In it he says:

The county is plastered with Liberal orators, submerged in Liberal rum, and polluted with Liberal money. They are scared blue and they are resorting to all the tactics known to civilization, heathenism, idolatry and low-down "Injun" cunning in order to

The Address-Mr. Doucet

win. You never saw such a desperate lot of desparadoes in your life.

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March 14, 1924

Mr. DOUCET:

Being a new member, Mr. Speaker, I would crave the indulgence -of hon. members opposite. I am not averse to crossexamination but I should like to say this-if my hon. friends will only be patient and wait a little while they will lose nothing by it. As to my position and candidature in 1921 I shall make that plain when the proper time comes. I wish to say that, while I belong to the French-Acadian race and profess the same creed as the hon. members for Rimouski and Vaudreuil-Soulanges, I follow proudly, as

I have already said, the principles laid down by Macdonald and Cartier. It was the latter,

I believe, who said that the last gun fired in the Dominion for the defence of British institutions would be fired by a French-Canadian. Let me say that the first gun to be fired-and God forbid that the day should ever come when such action will be necessary-in defence of the French language and the Catholic faith in this Dominion will be fired by a French Acadian.

We have heard something of by-elections in this country, and the last speaker referred to the by-election in Kent county, New Brunswick. Of course all hon. members know there was an election in that county.

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March 14, 1924

Mr. DOUCET:

When the hon. member

for York-Sunbury spoke, I did not accompany him, therefore I did not hear what he said. If he said anything that my hon. friends opposite object to, he will have a chance to express his opinion on that in the House. I wish hon. members to take note of the reasons why public sentiment in the county of Kent expressed itself on the 20th of December last in opposition to the present administration. In doing this I believe I am rendering a service to my county, and at the same time, if they are wise enough to give heed to it, I may be rendering a service also to the present government.

We had in mind the subject of immigration. in the first place, and regret was expressed at the extent of the exodus of our people to the country to the south of us. We spoke of increased taxation, of increased remuneration to men in high places, and of the policy announced at that time, and since put into effect, of reducing the expenditure on the civil service by turning out in the cold men in the lower positions while retaining at high salaries those in the upper places. We spoke also of the royal commissions, seven of which, I believe, were operating at that time. I need not dwell very long upon that; hon. members must have seen some of their reports. I venture to say, however, that the majority of these reports will not be read by anyone but by the man who is paid to read them. As a well-known eastern paper said, the whole sum and substance of these reports would be worth much less than thirty cents.

We dealt also with the question of railway rates; there is some dissatisfaction in connection with the present state of affairs in matters of transportation. We also made reference to the lack of markets; to the sending of Canadian goods through Canadian ports; and, last but not least, to the development of interprovincial trade. I should like, in the limited time available, to discuss these various questions, but I have , not an opportunity of doing so now, I may have occasion later in the session, to place my position on these matters fairly before the House.

I have told you, Mr. Speaker, of the great number of men bearing gifts who were in Kent county during the by-election campaign, but notwithstanding all these offers of gifts, the county could not be bought. I have here another gem which I think I should read to the

The Address-Mr. Doucet

House, dealing with the necessity to beware of

the man bringing gifts. It reads:

The good and kindly Veniot With his promises so calming To save his Liberal party From a premature embalming.

Oh, Mr. Copp, Oh, Mr. Copp,

The railway will extend,

Judicially he ever is Copp's and the people's friend.

It's sad and sorry work,

To keep the ship afloat.

But Copp will get no judgeship If Doucette "Copps" the vote.

Arthur comes in hot haste At the voice of King, his master,

To prevent a repetition Of that Halifax Disaster.

If these big guns be air guns To avert impending wreck,

They bring a long range cannon To belch from Old Quebec.

Yes, Mr. Speaker, the electors of Kent county were afraid of men bearing gifts. As the Trojans said of old, "Timeo Danaos et dona ferentes,"-I fear the Liberals even bringing gifts.

May I make some reference to the rewards given to those who took part in the Kent county campaign? In this instance, as you must know, failure rather than merit was being rewarded. First, we have the hon. Minister of Marine (Mr. Lapointe), promoted to the position of Minister of Justice. Then we have the hon. member for Richelieu (Mr. Cardin) promoted to the position of Minister of Marine and Fisheries. I want to say frankly, that as there had to be a Minister of Marine and Fisheries, and as, so far, the present party has to remain in power,

I am glad to see my hon. friend in a ministerial seat. Even though he was not successful, he certainly deserves a reward for the great amount of energy he displayed in that campaign. Then we have a third man who took part in the campaign, Mr. Arthur T. Leblanc, of Campbellton. He was appointed a judge of the Supreme Court of New Brunswick.

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