Jean-Paul MATTE

MATTE, Jean-Paul, B.A.

Parliamentary Career

June 18, 1962 - February 6, 1963
LIB
  Champlain (Quebec)
April 8, 1963 - September 8, 1965
LIB
  Champlain (Quebec)
November 8, 1965 - April 23, 1968
LIB
  Champlain (Quebec)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 1 of 6)


June 30, 1971

Does the Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development have a special assistant Jean-Paul Matte and, if so (a) does Mr. Matte work in the Minister's office in Ottawa (b) what is his daily and weekly schedule (c) what are his responsibilities (d) was he paid from October 1 to November 16, 1970 and from May 1 to May 31, 1971 (e) is he entitled to leave without pay and, if so, for how long (f) are some of his expenses reimbursable and, if so, which ones (g) what is his present annual salary (h) does he spend each Monday and Friday in the constituency of Champlain and, if so, for what purpose (i) did he take part in any activities connected with the by-election m Trois-Rivi&res on May 31, 1971 and, if so, was he authorized to do so by the Minister?

Topic:   QUESTIONS PASSED AS ORDERS FOR RETURN
Subtopic:   DEPARTMENT OF INDIAN AFFAIRS AND NORTHERN DEVELOPMENT-DUTIES OF MR. JEAN-PAUL MATTE
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May 8, 1969

Mr. Matie:

Mr. Speaker, I still have five or six minutes left. I was discussing the amendment requiring that the certificate be signed by three members of the committee, when in its opinion, the life of the mother cannot be kept safe from danger with the continuation of her pregnancy.

In order to avoid any mistake or medical error, it is important to get the formal guarantee duly signed by the committee and permitting the abortion so that should one or even two - of the three members of the committee be too permissive there would still be a safeguard, since all three members have to sign. It seems to us that this is a point which should be considered very seriously because should abortion ever be accepted, although we are still against it, we are trying to sensitize members and public opinion to that problem.

We realize more and more that the problem is far from being settled and that thanks to our comments, a good number of people have been aware for a while now, that the legislation which is being crammed down their throats-and I did say crammed-is not all it should be.

If people consider all the amendments which we have introduced, particularly the amendment which we are discussing now, they will easily detect the direction we want to give this legislation, so that even the most prudish, the most scrupulous people could say: "At least we know that they will not go beyond just and reasonable limits, and that all those people who would have liked to use this legislation to achieve more or less legitimate purposes, will find themselves foiled.

Mr. Speaker, our efforts to see the Minister of Justice take this into consideration are not prompted by our desire to win a battle and prove that we were right. It is not that at all. We simply want to better protect society. It is this protection that we have set our hearts on.

And if we did not have so many examples or experiences based on facts, we could perhaps be less informed on the subject and our remarks would be more or less useful.

But when we rely on the experience of all those who accepted abortion, when we consider the evidence given last year on Bill

May 8, 1969

Criminal Code

C-195 and this year on Bill C-150, we believe that government members should set aside their pride and admit once and for all that this bill C-150 includes clauses that must definitely be reexamined, clauses the effects of which are so serious that we cannot allow ourselves to pass them without sounding a note of warning.

When we are accused of being a mere handful to maintain that certain clauses should be opposed, it is somewhat false considering the stand taken in this house, for if we applied the solution advocated by the leader of the Ralliement creditiste, the hon. member for Temiscamingue (Mr. Caouette), we would ask the people themselves, by means of a referendum, what they think about it.

And if we could say that 90 per cent of the members in this house are in favour, and 10 per cent against, we would still maintain that the people as a whole are against. This is no surprise to us, considering the many empty seats in the house.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   CRIMINAL CODE
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January 22, 1969

Mr. Matie:

Yes, Mr. Speaker.

[DOT] (6:00 p.m.)

Topic:   NAVIGABLE WATERS PROTECTION ACT
Subtopic:   AMENDMENTS RESPECTING DEFINITIONS, UNAUTHORIZED WORKS, ETC.
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October 28, 1968

Has the government taken any steps to settle the Rossillon Affair and, if so, what steps were taken?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   L'AFFAIRE ROSSILLON
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October 17, 1968

Mr. Matie:

Mr. Chairman, with your permission, at the outset I should like to relate a small incident which happened this morning and which will acquaint the house with the tremendous task which we have to perform if we want to achieve the purpose explained to us earlier by the Prime Minister.

This morning, three members of our group were on their way to parliament; we were stopped by an Ottawa police officer and once again we had to put up with the pertness of

this strictly English-speaking police officer who treated us in an absolutely unacceptable manner in the capital of a so-called bilingual country.

At the outset, I will therefore refer to the B.N.A. Act, because I still fear that this resolution which we are now studying will not bring a great deal. That is why the environment must be such that we can really operate a change in this country. In section 133 of the B.N.A. Act, it is stated in two paragraphs that the parliament of Canada and the Quebec parliament are bilingual.

It is a well-known fact that those principles have been applied to their full extent in the province of Quebec. On the other hand, I do not intend to relate, at this stage, all the struggles that had to be fought to get tangible and concrete results. Allow me simply to point out that we have witnessed some kind of resurgence of the French fact in this house, more especially when the Creditistes from Quebec made their entry.

Topic:   OFFICIAL LANGUAGES
Subtopic:   PROVISIONS RESPECTING STATUS AND USE-APPOINTMENT OF COMMISSIONER, ETC.
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