Gordon GRAYDON

GRAYDON, Gordon, Q.C., B.A., LL.B.

Personal Data

Party
Progressive Conservative
Constituency
Peel (Ontario)
Birth Date
December 7, 1896
Deceased Date
September 19, 1953
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gordon_Graydon
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=795045ac-0a2d-489d-aac6-1477f9c815d1&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
barrister, lawyer, solicitor

Parliamentary Career

October 14, 1935 - January 25, 1940
CON
  Peel (Ontario)
March 26, 1940 - April 16, 1945
NAT
  Peel (Ontario)
  • Leader of the Official Opposition (January 1, 1943 - June 10, 1945)
June 11, 1945 - April 30, 1949
PC
  Peel (Ontario)
June 27, 1949 - June 13, 1953
PC
  Peel (Ontario)
August 10, 1953 - April 12, 1957
PC
  Peel (Ontario)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 1 of 1689)


May 25, 1956

Mr. Graydon:

May I say to the Prime Minister that this pretty well indicates the degree of seriousness of the offence and, I think, shows the ridiculousness of the position which the Prime Minister and the government have taken in connection with it.

Topic:   AFTER RECESS
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December 7, 1953

Mr. Gordon Graydon (Peel):

Mr. Speaker, may I just make one or two observations in connection with this proposal? As to a number of these conventions which arise out of the deliberations of the special agencies of the United Nations and of international organizations, it seems to me that a procedure such as that which has been recommended by the hon. member for Cape Breton South (Mr. Gillis) ought to be followed. When the conventions come before parliament, they come in the form of a resolution, and there is no opportunity in committee of the whole to interrogate anyone in the government; they sometimes also come in fairly detailed form as does this convention. On previous occasions, when resolutions of a detailed nature of this kind have been before the house, I have felt that proper provision is not made under the rules for a proper and full discussion unless the matter goes before a special committee of the house.

As to the present situation, I only want to make one or two additional remarks. We voted first for this declaration in 1948, as I understand it, and perhaps the minister will tell us what has been done in the interval to take it seriously. A couple of weeks ago the hon. member for Eglinton (Mr. Fleming) made a suggestion in the house which I think might well be brought back to the memory of hon. members. He was speaking about the possibility of our doing something with our great stocks of wheat to try to help those who are in need of help. I mention that merely as being one of the practical things which we have to consider.

Look at the actual amount which we have contributed, which I believe is somewhere between $1 and $2 million this year, in the way of assistance to underdeveloped countries, and make comparisons. Of course if you start with nothing the subscription will seem quite large, and I am not saying for a moment that it should be larger or smaller. I hope the minister will say something to us about what he regards as our responsibility in this question.

I know there are two views. There is the view that it is possible, by giving assistance to backward countries, to slacken their efforts, and actually do harm. Personally I find it difficult to believe that, provided it is done wisely. But I should like to hear about that. As I say, if you compare this amount, what we are spending on what we might call construction, with the amount that we are spending on defence, in other words on destruction, the comparison would be so trifling that you would not dare to give the figure. Obviously that is not a fair comparison at all and I do not suggest for a moment that it is. I should like to hear from the minister what he has to say about that.

You cannot spend even the short time that I did at the United Nations without having these things rise up and strike you. Despite all the wrangling that goes on there, you

cannot help feeling that somehow or other there ought to be some means of understanding. I think it was Charles Lamb who had criticized somebody with great asperity and a friend asked, "Do you know the man you are criticizing?" Lamb replied, "No, of course not; I could not attack him like that if I knew him". I hope there is force in that, although I must admit that the Russians seem to be able to continue their sharp attacks even though they are sitting in the seat next to you.

I am afraid my remarks have been rather rambling. This declaration might be treated as a matter which just passes in the night, so to speak, something that means nothing to us, something about which in our hearts we are really bored to death. If we take that attitude it seems to me that we may have occasion to rue it bitterly. On the other hand, common sense ought to enter in. I hope the minister will be able to give us a view which will combine the common-sense approach with these obligations at a time when we can see that right decisions may involve blessings beyond what we can imagine, while on the other hand wrong decisions may lead to evils beneath our darkest imaginings.

Topic:   HUMAN RIGHTS
Subtopic:   MOTION APPROVING UNIVERSAL DECLARATION ADOPTED BY GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF UNITED NATIONS
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May 9, 1953

Mr. Graydon:

You may be, too, before long.

Topic:   ADMINISTRATION OF JUSTICE
Subtopic:   REFERENCE TO PRESS REPORT OF REMARKS OF MR. JUSTICE MANSON IN VANCOUVER
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May 9, 1953

Mr. Graydon:

There must be many hon. members who have no background at all with respect to this matter. Perhaps the hon. member for Peace River felt that he could not give the background when he asked the question. Will the Minister of Justice indicate what the point is that is involved?

Topic:   ADMINISTRATION OF JUSTICE
Subtopic:   REFERENCE TO PRESS REPORT OF REMARKS OF MR. JUSTICE MANSON IN VANCOUVER
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May 9, 1953

Mr. Gordon Graydon (Peel):

May I ask

the Acting Prime Minister whether at any time today the Prime Minister (Mr. St. Laurent) intends to make any statement in connection with his discussions with President Eisenhower?

Topic:   IRRIGATION
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
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