Rodolphe LEMIEUX

LEMIEUX, The Hon. Rodolphe, P.C., K.C., B.C.L., LL.D.

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
Gaspé (Quebec)
Birth Date
November 1, 1866
Deceased Date
September 28, 1937
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rodolphe_Lemieux
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=733cae8a-7e57-46c6-ab2e-478ac991835f&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
author, journalist, lawyer, lecturer

Parliamentary Career

June 23, 1896 - October 9, 1900
LIB
  Gaspé (Quebec)
November 7, 1900 - September 29, 1904
LIB
  Gaspé (Quebec)
  • Solicitor General of Canada (January 29, 1904 - June 3, 1906)
February 20, 1904 - September 29, 1904
LIB
  Gaspé (Quebec)
  • Solicitor General of Canada (January 29, 1904 - June 3, 1906)
November 3, 1904 - September 17, 1908
LIB
  Nicolet (Quebec)
  • Solicitor General of Canada (January 29, 1904 - June 3, 1906)
  • Minister of Labour (June 4, 1906 - May 18, 1909)
  • Postmaster General (June 4, 1906 - August 10, 1911)
October 26, 1908 - July 29, 1911
LIB
  Gaspé (Quebec)
  • Minister of Labour (June 4, 1906 - May 18, 1909)
  • Postmaster General (June 4, 1906 - August 10, 1911)
September 21, 1911 - October 6, 1917
LIB
  Rouville (Quebec)
  • Minister of Marine and Fisheries (August 11, 1911 - October 6, 1911)
  • Minister of the Naval Service (August 11, 1911 - October 6, 1911)
December 17, 1917 - October 4, 1921
L LIB
  Gaspé (Quebec)
December 6, 1921 - September 5, 1925
LIB
  Gaspé (Quebec)
  • Speaker of the House of Commons (March 8, 1922 - June 2, 1930)
October 29, 1925 - July 2, 1926
LIB
  Gaspé (Quebec)
  • Speaker of the House of Commons (March 8, 1922 - June 2, 1930)
September 14, 1926 - May 30, 1930
LIB
  Gaspé (Quebec)
  • Speaker of the House of Commons (March 8, 1922 - June 2, 1930)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 1 of 1765)


May 30, 1930

Mr. SPEAKER:

Order. The question of privilege has been stated, the answer has been given. Now, I leave the chair for the house to go into committee of supply.

Hon. CHARLES A. DUNNING (Minister of Finance): I suggest that the wrongful use of a frank is a matter within Your Honour's control as Speaker of the house. Allegations have been made and in turn denied. The questions. I presume, are questions of fact.

I have not seen the frank, and I am not attempting to judge as to the correctness of my hon. friend's statement. I am merely remarking that it is a matter for Your Honour to deal with.

Topic:   PRIVILEGE-MR. DUFF
Full View Permalink

May 30, 1930

Mr. SPEAKER:

Let me tell my hon. friend at once: the Senate itself deals with its own employees. It appoints its officers; it appoints its servants as it pleases. The House of Commons is in a different position. Our appointments come under the Civil Service Commission.

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF MARINE AND FISHERIES
Full View Permalink

May 30, 1930

Mr. SPEAKER:

Mr. Prime Minister, Mr. Bennett, I wish to thank you from the bottom of my heart for your kind words. I have been in the house for thirty-four years. My heart is in this house. From the day I came here I have met friends only. On returning home this evening I can truly say that as Speaker of the Commons I have been actuated by good faith and fairness to all. When I took the Chair in 1922, I resolved that from the moment I stepped into it I should cease to be a partisan. I had been, God knows, a good partisan. I have striven to live up to my promise and I can declare honestly and conscientiously, that in every ruling, in every decision I gave as Speaker of the House of Commons, I have ignored parties and have followed the standing orders, the usages, the customs and traditions of parliament.

In 1926, when for the third time you unanimously reelected me Speaker of the house, I said that every morning as I passed in front of the monument of Alexander Mackenzie, that great Scoteh-Canadian and revered Prime Minister of the Dominion from 1874 to 1878,-I would read the beautiful inscription which characterized his life and crystallized his sense of responsibility:

Duty -was his law, conscience his ruler.

I have tried to live up to the great teaching that I find in that sentence.

Once more, I thank all parties in the House of Commons for the support they have given me. I have tried to maintain here British parliamentary traditions, and if I have a word of advice to offer to you, my friends, it is that in future, whether you sit on the left or on the right of the Speaker, or there, yonder, you will live up to those traditions. What is taking place in the world to-day shows conclusively that after all those traditions. when deeply rooted in the soil, constitute the best safeguard for justice and Liberty.

Motion agreed to and at 9.30 p.m. the sitting was suspended until 10.15 this day.

Prorogation

The house resumed at 10.15 o'clock.

Topic:   EXPRESSION OF CONGRATULATIONS AND GOOD WISHES TO MR. SPEAKER
Full View Permalink

May 30, 1930

Mr. SPEAKER:

It is a matter for experts to determine.

Topic:   PRIVILEGE-MR. DUFF
Full View Permalink

May 30, 1930

Mr. SPEAKER:

I will review the whole

question with both leaders and the hon. gentleman can can be assured that I shall deal generously with the staff, having regard to what was asked yesterday by hon. members.

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF MARINE AND FISHERIES
Full View Permalink