Frank OLIVER

OLIVER, The Hon. Frank, P.C.

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
Edmonton (Alberta)
Birth Date
September 1, 1853
Deceased Date
March 31, 1933
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frank_Oliver_(politician)
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=6e8d69a0-c443-4d32-9982-364df1473067&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
publisher

Parliamentary Career

June 23, 1896 - October 9, 1900
LIB
  Alberta (Provisional District) (Northwest Territories)
November 7, 1900 - September 29, 1904
LIB
  Alberta (Provisional District) (Northwest Territories)
November 3, 1904 - September 17, 1908
LIB
  Edmonton (Northwest Territories)
  • Minister of the Interior (April 8, 1905 - October 6, 1911)
  • Superintendent-General of Indian Affairs (April 8, 1905 - October 6, 1911)
April 25, 1905 - September 17, 1908
LIB
  Edmonton (Northwest Territories)
  • Minister of the Interior (April 8, 1905 - October 6, 1911)
  • Superintendent-General of Indian Affairs (April 8, 1905 - October 6, 1911)
October 26, 1908 - July 29, 1911
LIB
  Edmonton (Alberta)
  • Minister of the Interior (April 8, 1905 - October 6, 1911)
  • Superintendent-General of Indian Affairs (April 8, 1905 - October 6, 1911)
September 21, 1911 - October 6, 1917
LIB
  Edmonton (Alberta)
  • Minister of the Interior (April 8, 1905 - October 6, 1911)
  • Superintendent-General of Indian Affairs (April 8, 1905 - October 6, 1911)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 3 of 2438)


September 19, 1917

Mr. OLIVER:

I have no personal knowledge of this case. The memorandum was sent to me through the mail, and I present it just as it came to me. The explanation given by the hon. member from Kingston (Mr. Nickle) is an explanation which does not, to use a slang expression, "listen good" to the ordinary people of the country. The father of this child, whatever he was, gave his life for the country, and the country owes something to the child, at least that is the way the ordinary man looks at it. I want to assure the committee that the gentlemen who sent these representations are a committee of the prominent citizens of Edmonton, who have gathered together for the purpose of looking after such cases. It is not a partisan committee in any sense

of the word, and it has nothing to do with politics. They also mention the case of Mary L. Richmond, to which they refer as follows:

Oliver C. Richmond, the son of this woman, enlisted and went overseas, serving some time at the front, and was then invalided home and died some time after his return. It seems there is some difficulty in getting the pension for this mother, claiming that the hoy had a pre-disposition to tuberculosis, and that if he had not gone to the front he would not have died. The facts are, he went, came home and is dead, and there seems to be some finesse on the part of the doctors as to whether he really died because of exposure at the front or not. One doctor stated that there were latent conditions, which, to quote his own words, "were lit up by the strain of the soldier's service at the front." There is no doubt that this woman is entitled to a mother's pension for her son, who at the time of his enlistment was proceeding to his examinations in law and would have been a great support and help to her in years to come.

I have no doubt the Board of Pension Commissioners found reasons under the law for not granting the pension in this case, but assuming the facts to be as stated, and I have no reason to think otherwise, their action does not appeal to me-and I do not think it appeals to citizens generally- as a case of keeping faith with those who have rendered the most praiseworthy service to the country.

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September 19, 1917

Mr. OLIVER:

I wish to draw attention to certain further memoranda forwarded to me by the Citizens Committee of Edmonton. I have already read the memorandum in which they make the assertion that the present pensions of dependents of deceased soldiers are too low, and in which they mention a particular case. They also bring forward two other classes of cases which are a little out of the ordinary but which should, I think, be brought to the attention of the committee. They are cases in which no pension has been granted under the strict interpretation of the Pensions Regulations. In reference to the case of George Lennox Buchanan, they say:

This is the orphan son of a soldier who was undergoing a term of imprisonment, and who had Shown such good conduct that his term was shortened. Upon release he enlisted, went overseas and was killed on active service. His wife is also dead. The child referred to was

adopted under the provincial regulations governing the Department of Neglected Children of Alberta. This was a real act of charity on the part of George Buchanan and his wife, who adopted the child. They have no children of their own and are an old couple. At present the boy has a splendid home, hut they have no resources and at their deaths could leave no estate. The foster father feels that this child should receive pension, and is willing to execute any trust whereby any pension or sum of money granted on behalf of the child should be kept for his sole use and benefit in order that he may receive a proper education. [DOT]

The point is, the orphan son of a deceased soldier was adopted by an old couple, who are able to provide for the child while they live, but who are certain not to live very long, and before the child would be able to earn his own livelihood he would be left destitute.

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September 19, 1917

1. Is $2.21 a bushel for No. 1 hard wheat a maximum or a fixed price to growers?

2. What commission is the elevator or commission agent allowed to charge?

3. Is commission charged to Canadian dealers the same as to export purchasers?

4. How many commission profits can he added from purchasers and consumer, or from miller to baker?

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   MAXIMUM OR FIXED PRICE OF WHEAT.
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September 19, 1917

Mr. OLIVER:

It seems there is some difficulty in getting a' pension for this woman, because her son had a predisposition to tuberculosis. Supposing that under the literal interpretation of the recommendations of the committee last year, this woman would not he entitled to compensation I sill think that the business of a judge is to render justice and not merely to interpret the law. His interpretation. I still think that the business of a ing justice, and I think, much more than in the case of the judge, the business of the commission is to render justice and not merely to interpret the law. However, I wish to say that without prejudice. I am merely taking a position which I think is in accord with the general view of the people of the country.

There is another point that this committee raises that will have a serious hearing, particularly when compulsory service is instituted. It is a very serious matter. We have found serious cases under the voluntary system, and they will be very much more serious, I am afraid, under the compulsory .system. These are cases where people have financial obligations, and they have no means of carrying them when they have no resources other than the pension. I will give a few instances. I am quite aware that they are outside of the ordinary matter of pensions. We have never considered these cases as being entitled to pen, sions, but in Great Britain, under the Compulsory Service Act, they are taking into account .such cases as these. Under our proposed Compulsory Service Act we will also be warranted in taking note of such cases as the following:

Hannah Lord.-This woman's pension is $32 per month. Previous to the enlistment of her husband, they purchased a lot for $600 upon which $400 has been paid. Interest and taxes for two years are still unpaid.

Amy Bloomer.-This woman's pension is $34 per month. Previous to the enlistment of the soldier they purchased a lot for $2,400, upon which they erected a store and bam for $2,600. There is a mortgage against this property for $2,000, interest overdue $95, taxes about $94. There is no income from this property at present, nor will there be any until times "piclo up" in this city. The total income of this widow is $50,'including the pension. The $16 per month will be reduced as years go by. The widow stated to our committee that unless some help could be obtained until times get good again, she will lose her equity in this property.

Mary E. Marsden.-This woman's pension is $56 per month. She owns a house and lot valued at $5,000 against which there is a mortgage of $1,200. The widow states that she can just live on the pension she receives, and can pay the taxes after severe sacrifices, 'but cannot see how it is possible to redeem the property before foreclosure.

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September 19, 1917

Mr. OLIVER:

No, I did not wish for that. All I wanted was to know how it came that we were voting this particular sum of money for the Northwest rebellion.

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