Frank OLIVER

OLIVER, The Hon. Frank, P.C.

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
Edmonton (Alberta)
Birth Date
September 1, 1853
Deceased Date
March 31, 1933
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frank_Oliver_(politician)
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=6e8d69a0-c443-4d32-9982-364df1473067&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
publisher

Parliamentary Career

June 23, 1896 - October 9, 1900
LIB
  Alberta (Provisional District) (Northwest Territories)
November 7, 1900 - September 29, 1904
LIB
  Alberta (Provisional District) (Northwest Territories)
November 3, 1904 - September 17, 1908
LIB
  Edmonton (Northwest Territories)
  • Minister of the Interior (April 8, 1905 - October 6, 1911)
  • Superintendent-General of Indian Affairs (April 8, 1905 - October 6, 1911)
April 25, 1905 - September 17, 1908
LIB
  Edmonton (Northwest Territories)
  • Minister of the Interior (April 8, 1905 - October 6, 1911)
  • Superintendent-General of Indian Affairs (April 8, 1905 - October 6, 1911)
October 26, 1908 - July 29, 1911
LIB
  Edmonton (Alberta)
  • Minister of the Interior (April 8, 1905 - October 6, 1911)
  • Superintendent-General of Indian Affairs (April 8, 1905 - October 6, 1911)
September 21, 1911 - October 6, 1917
LIB
  Edmonton (Alberta)
  • Minister of the Interior (April 8, 1905 - October 6, 1911)
  • Superintendent-General of Indian Affairs (April 8, 1905 - October 6, 1911)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 1 of 2438)


September 20, 1917

1. Is Lieutenant M. J. Howe, formerly of the 188th Battalion, still in the service of the Militia Department?

2. If so, what are his duties, pay and allowances?

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   LIEUT. M. J. HOWE.
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September 19, 1917

Mr. OLIVER:

I understand the argument of my hon. friend from Frontenac (Mr. Edwards) to be that being optional it placed the officer more dependent upon the favour of his superior than upon good service, whereas if he gets it as a straight increase in salary, of course he is still independent.

Topic:   SUPPLY.
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September 19, 1917

1. Is $2.21 a bushel for No. 1 hard wheat a maximum or a fixed price to growers?

2. What commission is the elevator or commission agent allowed to charge?

3. Is commission charged to Canadian dealers the same as to export purchasers?

4. How many commission profits can he added from purchasers and consumer, or from miller to baker?

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   MAXIMUM OR FIXED PRICE OF WHEAT.
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September 19, 1917

Mr. OLIVER:

further amount required, $1,800 ; to provide an amount for the Deputy Speaker of the House of Commons in lieu of apartments, for the year ending 31st March, 1918, at the rate of $5 per diem-further amount required, $600 ; annuity to Dr. Thomas Barnard Flint, upon his retirement from the Clerkship of the House of Commons through physical disability, $2,500- $59,900.

Topic:   SUPPLY.
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September 19, 1917

Mr. OLIVER:

It seems there is some difficulty in getting a' pension for this woman, because her son had a predisposition to tuberculosis. Supposing that under the literal interpretation of the recommendations of the committee last year, this woman would not he entitled to compensation I sill think that the business of a judge is to render justice and not merely to interpret the law. His interpretation. I still think that the business of a ing justice, and I think, much more than in the case of the judge, the business of the commission is to render justice and not merely to interpret the law. However, I wish to say that without prejudice. I am merely taking a position which I think is in accord with the general view of the people of the country.

There is another point that this committee raises that will have a serious hearing, particularly when compulsory service is instituted. It is a very serious matter. We have found serious cases under the voluntary system, and they will be very much more serious, I am afraid, under the compulsory .system. These are cases where people have financial obligations, and they have no means of carrying them when they have no resources other than the pension. I will give a few instances. I am quite aware that they are outside of the ordinary matter of pensions. We have never considered these cases as being entitled to pen, sions, but in Great Britain, under the Compulsory Service Act, they are taking into account .such cases as these. Under our proposed Compulsory Service Act we will also be warranted in taking note of such cases as the following:

Hannah Lord.-This woman's pension is $32 per month. Previous to the enlistment of her husband, they purchased a lot for $600 upon which $400 has been paid. Interest and taxes for two years are still unpaid.

Amy Bloomer.-This woman's pension is $34 per month. Previous to the enlistment of the soldier they purchased a lot for $2,400, upon which they erected a store and bam for $2,600. There is a mortgage against this property for $2,000, interest overdue $95, taxes about $94. There is no income from this property at present, nor will there be any until times "piclo up" in this city. The total income of this widow is $50,'including the pension. The $16 per month will be reduced as years go by. The widow stated to our committee that unless some help could be obtained until times get good again, she will lose her equity in this property.

Mary E. Marsden.-This woman's pension is $56 per month. She owns a house and lot valued at $5,000 against which there is a mortgage of $1,200. The widow states that she can just live on the pension she receives, and can pay the taxes after severe sacrifices, 'but cannot see how it is possible to redeem the property before foreclosure.

Topic:   SUPPLY.
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