James Charles BRADY

BRADY, James Charles

Personal Data

Party
Conservative (1867-1942)
Constituency
Skeena (British Columbia)
Birth Date
January 21, 1876
Deceased Date
January 24, 1962
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Charles_Brady
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=6d54c06b-83db-41ad-8ccf-5ad09a81d62a&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
school principal, teacher

Parliamentary Career

September 14, 1926 - May 30, 1930
CON
  Skeena (British Columbia)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 4 of 54)


May 16, 1930

Mr. BRADY:

There is a duty of 2 cents per pound imposed on Canadian fish entering the United States. The result is that the Canadian fisherman is penalized to the extent of 2 cents a pound on his fish. If, on a stormy day, a Canadian fisherman should be unable to reach the' port of Prince Rupert and should turn into the port of Ketchikan, which is seventy miles north in United States territory, he has to pay poft dues, entrance and clearing charges, and' other things which cost a considerable sum, varying in respect of the size of the vessel. The point I should like to bring strongly to the attention of the minister is this: Why should not the Canadian fishermen be protected in accordance with the principle laid down by the countervailing duty which the government is applying to other commodities? Is he not entitled at least to have that protection which has been afforded

other industries such as agriculture? I have under my hand correspondence from many quarters; from the senator representing Alaska; from the report of the United States tariff commission; from the Seattle Fishermen's Association and from the Canadian Halibut Union, and all are agreed that a reasonable solution is possible. Until now we could not get the government to believe that when we advocated something for the relief of the Canadian Pacific fishermen we were not urging retaliation against the United States. That myth is dead; there is no more heard of it now, only I trust that the government will see to it that this very important industry is given relief. It is only what is coming to it and is in accord with the principle which has been laid down under the item now under discussion. Without saying anything further, I hope this matter will receive the immediate attention of the Minister of Finance and that he will add this one item to the present list.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF AMENDMENT
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May 16, 1930

Mr. BRADY:

What are the Americans doing on the Atlantic seaboard? A Canadian fishing vessel on the Atlantic seaboard cannot enter an American port in order to sell its fish; it must return to a Canadian port and transfer the fish into carriers for disposal in United States markets. What is being done in Prince Rupert? American vessels to the number of over 300 enter the port without paying anything, the fish is sold on the exchange in competition with Canadian fish, put into bond and given quick transit into the United States. This question has never been brought by the government before the United States in the right manner, and I do honestly believe that the United States government will assist in a correct settlement of this problem, one which would give to the Canadian halibut fisherman that which he is entitled to. The port of Prince Rupert and the Canadian fishermen should be treated on an equitable basis, especially when one considers that the United States is considering the raising of the duty on frozen halibut to 5 cents per pound.

We have been hearing of Japan in connection with silk, but let us consider that country from a fishing standpoint. Last year the Japanese landed in the city of Seattle 400,000 pounds of very excellent frozen halibut, which was sold at 9 cents per pound, which price included the 2 cents per pound duty. Let us

suppose that the rate suggested by the United States tariff board goes into effect-what might happen? Japan -would immediately turn her attention to Canada and it would not be very long before a serious situation might exist here. The Japanese can catch the fish, bring them across the Pacific to Seattle, and sell them for 9 cents per pound. Would the Canadian fisherman, operating a five-man boat, be able to compete with the Japanese?

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF AMENDMENT
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May 16, 1930

Mr. BRADY:

Under this item I should

like to direct the attention of the minister to what I consider to be a grave omission from the list of items under the countervailing duties. I refer to fish, which I think should be included under this heading. If any hon. member questions me I can quote from the Bible, from Murray's classical dictionary and from Webster's new international dictionary to prove that fish is meat, and consequently should be included under this item. The fishing industry on the Pacific coast is very important, and I am quite sure that if a few facts are laid before the government they will realize the importanace of including fish under the countervailing tariff.

Here is the situation. At the present moment on the Pacific coast over 315 American vessels are engaged in the halibut trade, and they use Canadian ports without paying any dues at all. There are no harbour dues; they have the full freedom of those ports and they pay only 81 for a fishing licence. They have the full benefit of our railways in order to send their products to the American market, and they are able to get for their fresh fish 2 cents per pound more than the Canadian fisherman gets.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF AMENDMENT
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May 16, 1930

Mr. BRADY:

I do not know, but I know that the American rate is 2 cents per pound. Last year the United States was able to send

1,125,000 pounds of halibut into Canada on a payment of one cent per pound duty.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF AMENDMENT
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May 16, 1930

Mr. BRADY:

Put a straight duty on then, or a port tax.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF AMENDMENT
Full View Permalink