James Charles BRADY

BRADY, James Charles

Personal Data

Party
Conservative (1867-1942)
Constituency
Skeena (British Columbia)
Birth Date
January 21, 1876
Deceased Date
January 24, 1962
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Charles_Brady
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=6d54c06b-83db-41ad-8ccf-5ad09a81d62a&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
school principal, teacher

Parliamentary Career

September 14, 1926 - May 30, 1930
CON
  Skeena (British Columbia)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 3 of 54)


May 27, 1930

Mr. BRADY:

And we like you, too.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF AMENDMENT
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May 27, 1930

Mr. J. C. BRADY (Skeena):

Mr. Speaker, permit me to say a few words on this very important treaty. The very fact that two nations decide to enter into a treaty presupposes the importance of the subject matter dealt with. Undoubtedly the halibut fishing industry is of very great importance, not merely to Canada but also to the United States. I have read the treaty as brought down yesterday. I am in perfect accord with the efforts made to conserve the greatest fishing banks at present in the world. If

hon. members have read the story of our Atlantic fishing grounds they will recall that many years ago halibut existed in abundance on the great fishing banks of the North sea; to-day they are non-existent. We find that, steadily, for the last twenty years halibut which was caught in abundance off cape Flattery, many years ago, were decimated in that area, and1 then Hecate straits, became the great centre of our halibut industry and continued to be so for a period of ten to fifteen years. Once more the scene changed. To-day the halibut fishermen have to travel right to the extreme end of Alaskan boundaries; they have to go as far as Kodiak, and beyond, even to Unalaska near the Behring sea. That being the case we must realize the gravity and importance of this treaty renewed between two great nations.

I do regret however that in the text of the treaty the government has overlooked a very important matter in respect to the halibut situation. At the present time the great weight of power, wealth and control of these fisheries is not in Canadian hands and has not been for years past; it is in the hands of Americans. They have the wealth and the power, and through these sources they have obtained almost complete control of this great and important fishing industry. For example, last year in the port of Prince Rupert over 30,000,000 pounds of halibut were landed, and of that poundage 20,000,000 pounds came in American vessels. For some reason or another it is a very easy matter to have the press misrepresent what one is trying honestly to represent to the public. What I said last year, and what I repeat this year, has nothing to do with retaliation upon the United States; it is simply a question of equality and fair dealing between the two countries which have made this treaty. I want to impress upon the government the fact that in our salmon fisheries we have a large area of neutral waters; strictly speaking these should be part of the Canadian waters. I refer to the great Hecate straits lying between Queen Charlotte islands and the mainland of Canada. What happens in connection with this fishing ground? Every year hundreds of American fishing vessels enter our harbours and violate the sacred treaty which was entered into years ago between the United States and Canada. I gave evidence of this last year. The result is that in every phase of this great and important industry the Canadian fisherman has not the rights to which he is entitled, while on the other hand the American nation realize the importance and the greatness of the fishing industry and

Halibut Fisheries Convention

are ever alert to get every advantage. So important is the fishing industry and so great the demand of the American public for fish that we can never hope to supply it. Fish is one of the most important foods consumed by the American people. I may be too late, but I ask the Prime Minister to make one more effort to secure for Canadian fishermen, their rights in connection with this important industry. A few weeks ago, I placed before this house certain facts; they are facts which can be authenticated by any one who desires so to do. Canada has in Prince Rupert a wonderful port on the Pacific coast, and it is the only port at which American vessels can deliver their fish and have them sent with expedition to the great markets of the United States. The result is that the American fishing vessels bring their fish to that port, and they do not pay a single cent; they are charged only one dollar for the licence to fish, and they receive the full benefits of the port. They are allowed to ship their fish from that port in bond; they seek Canadian ports as a shelter from storm; they receive all the benefits we can confer and in return we receive practically nothing.

I urge the government in pursuance of this treaty to try to impress upon the United States the necessity of a fair deal in a matter which has a profound interest both for that country and Canada. That is all I ask.

Topic:   HALIBUT FISHERIES
Subtopic:   CONVENTION BETWEEN CANADA AND THE UNITED STATES
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May 24, 1930

Mr. BRADY:

Does that $2,000 cover the cost for the nine provinces?

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT
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May 23, 1930

Mr. BRADY:

May I be permitted to bring to the attention of the Minister of Finance a telegram which I received this morning. I do not know whether or not I am in order, but as the minister has mentioned paper manufacturers I think I may be permitted to direct his attention to a very important omission from the countervailing items. The telegram reads as follows:

Please use your utmost efforts have kraft and wrapping papers placed on countervailing list in budget. This automatically raises duty five per cent on paper imported from United States. Paper now being shipped to British Columbia from United States at ruinous prices and we strongly urge application countervailing principle as protection from unscrupulous competition badly needed.

Pacific Mills Limited D. G. Stenstrom, resident manager.

This kraft and wrapping paper is really a completed article in that very large plant which employs about 2,500 men and the request here made is in accord with one desire to encourage the complete fabrication in Canada of our raw materials. The purpose of this message is to prevent the extensive importation of the very commodity which the Pacific mills is able to produce. This branch of the pulp industry has greatly aided employment and extends the scope of the policy of developing industries in Canada, a policy which I believe the Minister of Finance is just as anxious as we are to see extended in

Canada, namely, that the greatest part of our raw materials should lbe brought to the finished state in this country. I trust tire minister will take the time to examine into this very important request from the manager of the Pacific Mills Limited, Ocean Falls.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF AMENDMENT
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May 16, 1930

Mr. BRADY:

I do not know, but I know that the American rate is 2 cents per pound. Last year the United States was able to send

1,125,000 pounds of halibut into Canada on a payment of one cent per pound duty.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF AMENDMENT
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