James William MADDIN

MADDIN, James William, K.C., LL.B.

Personal Data

Party
Liberal-Conservative
Constituency
Cape Breton South (Nova Scotia)
Birth Date
September 8, 1874
Deceased Date
September 29, 1961
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_William_Maddin
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=6c464b76-816d-4b88-8d66-1501f13845b5&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
lawyer

Parliamentary Career

October 26, 1908 - July 29, 1911
L-C
  Cape Breton South (Nova Scotia)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 1 of 57)


July 28, 1911

Mr. MADDIN.

The hon. Minister for Finance made some observations on the floor of this House on Monday the 24th inst., to which I would invite the particular attention of hon. members. He said:

We have achieved a reciprocity in natural products, without having to make any important concessions in the matter of manufactures.

This reciprocity is a good thing for the manufacturer, and I venture respectfully to repeat a word of advice which I offered them not long ago. I say unhesitatingly that from the point of view of the manufacturers of Canada this reciprocity agreement is a good arrangement, and, if it goes through, we may reasonably say to the western farmer: 'Well, you cannot have all you want in this wicked world, but this goes a long way towards meeting your demands, and we can fairly ask you o give and take, and let the eastern manufacturer have a fair show/ and we believe they will do it.

I would also like to draw the special attention of the House to the following sentence of this paragraph:

But, if perchance the manufacturers in their great power should unite in opposing and possibly condemning, or even defeating this measure, then there will rise up in that western country a storm cloud bigger than a man's hand, and the end will be a change in the fiscal policy of the country, which the manufacturers will find much greater than anything they conceived of.

Mr. Chairman was there ever a more cowardly threat levelled at the heads of the manufacturers of Canada? And when we realize that it comes from a minister of the Crown in a British colony it seems to have all the more degrading ring about it. Could there toe anything more dastardly than to practically threaten the extinction of any maunfacturer who dares to raise his voice or mark his ballot against this iniquitous pact because two old gentlemen brought it back from Washington? If the Finance Minister goes on making these threats, we will, by a process of elimination, soon discover who the -contributors to the $120,000 purse were. We can fairly draw the deduction that there were not many manufacturers contributing to that purse, and if he were to denounce a few other sources, then, by a process of elimination, we could readily conclude who (he contributors were. I submit that no minister of 'the Crown in any British colony would have the audacity, the baire-facedness to express on the floors of any colonial parliament

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS-RECIPROCAL TRADE WITH THE UNITED STATES.
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July 28, 1911

Mr. MADDIN.

Now, here was the appeal of a gentleman who had spent some considerable time in the company of the Prime Minister, and was no doubt with the Prime Minister when he was making just such a speech in the city of Montreal. It sounds very much like that which the Prime Minister delivered in reply to the farmers of the west last December in this chamber. I am not surprised that he did not care to discuss reciprocity to any extent in the county of Pictou, or in any other part of the province of Nova Scotia. Now, Mr. Chairman, I have pointed out that the Minister of Finance received, that brochure from the coal operators of JNova Scotia; he absolutely disregarded it, and I cannot understand how, since he has disregarded it, that in the last local election in Nova Scotia, so many of the coal operators' bosses should be active partisans, and been busy brow beating and intimidating the workingmen of the Dominion Coal uompany in order to get them to the polls to vote for the Murray candidates. The Finance Minister absolutely disregarded that petition. The same seems to have been true of every other petition that has come from the county of Cape Breton. I can remember when there was a Libera! sitting for the county of Cape Breton. It is only a few years ago when a delegation left the city of Sydney headed by the warden, Mr. Levatte, and some two or three of the municipal councillors, with Mayor Richardson, of Sydney, Mayor Macdonald, of Sydney Mines, and two or three councillors from Glace Bay and Dominion, people who had been appointed at a public meeting in the courthouse in the summer of 1908, to come up, here and strengthen the hands of Mr. Johnston, who then occupied a seat on the floor of this House supporting this government, in an endeavour to obtain a railway from St. Peter's canal down the shores of Bras d'Or lake into the city of Sydney. That is government by delegation. But that railway has not been built, although such a strong Liberal aggregation came up here to assist a Liberal member occupying the seat which I occupy to-day. it was only a year or two before that when D. K. McIntyre, of Sydney, at the expense of the parishioners of East Bay, came up to Ottawa to strengthen the hands of Mr. Johnston to get a subsidy towards that railway. Why, Sir, when the people of the town of Glace Bay wanted four drop letter boxes in their town, they did not get them until Peter E. Ogilvie, one of the town councillors of Glace Bay, came as a delegate to Ottawa to strengthen Mr. Johnston's hands. Always Mr. Johnston had to be fortified, always Mr. Johnston's petitions and delegations were turned down. In 1910 the coal operators of the province had their petitions and their requests turned down. I submit it is time that the people of the

county of Cape Breton, above all other counties should cease sending delegations to this government in the hope of obtaining fair and equitable treatment.

Now, Mr. Chairman, there is another matter I would like to point out. I have endeavoured, from a historical point of view, to trace the growth and development of this country, the difficulties which have been overcome. We are merely passers by. We are inheritors by the law of descent of one of the finest countries under the sun. Commencing at the Atlantic seaboard, the province of Nova Scotia, for its square mileage, cannot be surpassed in its mineral resources, its fisheries and its forests. There is no better farming, lumbering and fishing province than the province of New Brunswick. The province of Quebec has its manifold advantages in farming and mineral resources, and its great commercial enterprises. The province of Ontario has long been described, and properly so, as the banner province of the Dominion of Canada, When we pass by Lake Superior to the provinces of Manitoba, Alberta and Saskatchewan, we have a country of rolling prairies, of fields of wheat, capable of producing sufficient to feed the whole of the British Empire, and almost the whole of the English speaking people. Then, after crossing the Kocky Mountains to the province of British Columbia, we reach perhaps the richest of them all in natural resources. These provinces, under a confederation such as we have, are not ours to dangle in the market, they are not ours to dispose of by a deed in fee .simple. They are ours merely for the purpose of a life estate, we are merely the trustees for our descendants who are to come after us. We have committed to our charge a great responsibility in looking after the interests of this great country, for which we shall be held responsible by our children and our children's children.

We cannot deal quietly with a situation of this kind. We have a certain amount of trade with Great Britain. She carries our .grain back to the old country when she brings some of her manufactures out to this. Divert our trade north and south and what will be the result? If our wheat is to find its way to Minneapolis, to the Atlantic seaboard, through the United States, or through the rolling mills of the United States, there to be rolled and shipped to England in its manufactured form, England must suffer to some extent, and we must suffer even to a greater extent. In 1886 the Minister of Finance was persuading the people of Nova Scotia to look for cheaper flour-always in the United States. At. the very moment almost when the Canadian Pacific railway was opened up, in 1886, he wafe telling the

people of Nova Scotia: Secede, secede from confederation, let us have free trade with the United States, let us have reciprocity- his very words. The reciprocity bee has been in his bonnet now for more than a generation. He never conceived the idea that the wheat for the Nova Scotian's flour could be raised in the Dominion of Canada, but a great statesman had conceived the idea. Sir Charles Tupper ha.d said that when the road was built traffic would be carried eastward and westward, and tbey would open up a country capable of raising 200,00.0,000 bushels of wheat. Hon. gentlemen at that time in the House, talking about it in the corridors, said he was crazy. On the floors of the House they were more respectful, but they were none the less severe. They said that the railway would not pay for its axle grease, that there were nothing but buffaloes and Indians in the west and that it was folly to have built the road. Sir Charles Tuuper is living to-day to see his prognostications verified and the Minister' of Finance and bis friends who had fought for reciprocity and who had tried to turn the hearts and minds of the people of Nova Scotia towards Boston for their flour and other supplies hoped that some day they would occupy the treasury benches where they would reap that which Sir Charles Tupper had sown.

I do not intend to occupy the attention of the House much longer. I can only say that while we have been developing our country to the extent of 8,000,000 people while we have built up our manufactures to aggregate over a million dollars a year, while we have money stacked in the bank to the extent of $990,000,000 while we have prospered to the extent we have, while we have -been doing that, as I pointed out to-day, we did it without having to assume any national obligations. But, we went through the fire of test which tried our manhood, which tried the stuff that was in us. We have developed this country, and it is our duty to maintain it and discharge our obligation towards the mother country. Those people who manned those vessels, who manned those fortifications, who built those fortifications, who built those warships, who made British traffic on the high seas safe, who made the British household safe, have been borne down by taxes until to-day Great Britain is face to face with the two greatest problems which confront the white race. One is the question of the unemployed. Travel across this continent from Vancouver to Sydney and you would not find a door at which you could knock and ask for a meal and be turned away. We have no poor or impoverished peopie in this country. It may he that in Montreal or Toronto an

occasional family are in want, but it is a matter of pride more than anything else. They could easily be relieved. Some of our people are poor, some of them have nst much money, some of them have no ships, or lands or automobiles, but they all mane an lionest living, they can all find plenty to eat and plenty to wear. This is not true of the other side.

They have the great burden of taxation which was borne upon the shoulders of the mother country.. In guarding! us while we were in our swaddling clothes there has grown up a condition the result of which is that there are hundreds of thousands of people born in empty doorways, or drygoods boxes, under wharfs, in cellars, in out of the way corners; there are hundreds of thousands of these to be found in London, Liverpool, Birmingham, Nottingham, Manchester, Dublin and Glasgow, who never had a roof over their heads but the sky, hundreds of thousands who never use a knife or fork or eat off a table. Great Britain is face to face with the task of coping with the unemployed, aged and impoverished. There are hundreds of thousands of them in Great Britain, and Uncle Sam comes up to his tariff wall with the olive branch and beckons to us and asks us to tear down the wall to let them obtain access to our natural resources. We give them 160 acres of the best land on the face of the earth, give them admission to this country, we let them come in and compete on even terms with our farmers, we let the farmers from Dakota, Montana and Minnesota cross the parallel, come into our western country, take up Canadian farms, become, perhaps, Canadian citizens in name at least, raise identically the same crops that they were raising in those same states and then send them back and trade with the same old customers that they traded with before they came to this country. That is what the United States asks us to do. Shall we do it? Have we come to the parting of the ways? We have developed the resources of our country under the conditions which I have outlined here to-night. Surelv there is sufficient of manhood in_ us that we shall meet our obligations in a* manly way instead of lowing our tariff wall, instead of negotiating with this people, who fought us, let us maintain the advantage which we now have. The first printing press that was ever set up in Ontario was set up for the purpose of publishing sedition and treason in order to influence the Canadian mind, set up by Americans and paid for with American money. Shall we lower our tariff wall and allow free access to the people of the United States to take up our square mileage, raise the same crops and send them back to the same customers? Shall we permit them to take our raw materials, manufacture them and sell them Mr. MADDIN.

to Britain or sell them to us? Or shall we assist Great Britain in such a way as to relieve the pressure that now bears heavily upon the shoulders of the mother country? Had we mot better open up the developed country of the west, enable her to solve the unemployed problem and so contribute some little at least to the discharge of this great national obligation which we can never fully repay.

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July 28, 1911

Mr. MADDIN.

Resolutions asking for free natural products.

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July 28, 1911

Mr. MADDIN.

This was continued down until 1896. In 1896, the present administration came into power. A great many people expected that they would at once wipe out the National Policy. As the hon. member for Brandon (Mr. Sifton) said during the course of this debate, he understood that the fiscal policy of this country had been fixed ever since the Fielding tariff of 1897, so that every man from Vancouver to Sydney, from the' Great Lakes to the Arctic Ocean, knew what it was. There was no difference of opinion among statesmen or politicians in this country, with regard to the best policy for the people of this country. During all these years, from 1867, some 44 years, we mapped out our own career, we blazed the trail through the forest, we built railways and canals that have cost this country over $500,000,000. We built them east and west, we bridged a chasm of 1,200 miles of Canadian Pacific railway that does not originate one dollar's worth of freight or passenger traffic. We built these lines of canals east and west, and because geographically that was the proper route to build them by, but because we had a neighbour to the south so hostile that we were obliged to build them east and west whether we liked it or not. We have built those lines of trade and we have developed an interprovincial trade which hon. members who have preceded me have described. On the 1st day of January last every one in Canada was happy, contented and prosperous. We had developed our trade interprovin-cially, we had built our railways and canals as I have pointed out, and whilst we did it we lived under the Union Jack. We did not share in England's difficulties. The people of the old country had extended the British Empire until we boasted that the sun never set on it, but Great Britain never asked us for one single dollar. We went on developing our resources until it is said now that the fruit is ripe to fall from the tree. Whilst we were building our railways and canals, whilst we were extending our manufactures in the Dominion of Canada, there i3 not a member of this House who picked up a British or a colonial newspaper and read the head lines of threatened war between Germany and Britain, between France and Britain, who gave it a second thought. We crawled under the_ sheets and went to bed when we felt like it, we got up when we felt like it, and amongst the worries of the day we did not carry any national responsibility. Why? Because Britain's North Atlantic squadron patrolled our Atlantic seaboard; because 110-ton disappearing guns were mounted at York Redoubt on the shores of Halifax harbour; because masked batteries at Port Pleasant, at the eastern passage, fortified Halifax harbour and because 3,500

redcoats and 500 sappers and engineers with guns and ammunition guarded the city while we slept. At Quebec the same conditions obtained. The fortifications were there, equally fit, prepared to meet the invader and there again there were 4,000 redcoats of Great Britain manning the forts, patrolling the city whilst the people of Canada were developing its resources, extending its trade, meeting the competition of our hostile neighbours to the south. On the Pacific coast, at Esquimalt, similar fortifications, every days' pay at the port hundred redcoats were there and the South Pacific squadron of Great Britain patrolled the Pacific ocean. Every ship, every man aboard those ships, every dollar's worth of fortifications, every days' pay at the port of Halifax, Quebec and Esquimalt, was paid by the burdened taxpayers of Great Britain, who were holding the flag secure above our heads, and all that we did was, on May 24 or Dominion Day, to give ourselves a holiday, sing ' God Save the Queen,' ' Rule Britannia, Britannia Rules the Waves '-that was our contribution. On Friday, the 19th of last December, a delegation came from the west. They filled the chamber, they filled the galleries of this House, they packed the corridors around this House. They numbered some 1,600, and they came from the west which had grown up and developed after the building of the Canadian Pacific Tailway. They filled this House and they had the right hon. the First Minister and a few of his cabinet sitting where you, Mr. Chairman, and the Clerk of this House sit tonight. Their representatives stood up and read resolutions asking for what? Asking for this trade pact?

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July 28, 1911

Mr. MADDIN.

Positively not. I think the member for Bellechasse (Mr. Talbot) must have a pain.

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