Daniel Duncan MCKENZIE

MCKENZIE, The Hon. Daniel Duncan, P.C., K.C.

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
North Cape Breton and Victoria (Nova Scotia)
Birth Date
January 8, 1859
Deceased Date
June 8, 1927
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daniel_Duncan_McKenzie
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=6c38f39b-1f70-4da5-ac6d-14d796590e55&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
judge, lawyer

Parliamentary Career

November 3, 1904 - February 15, 1906
LIB
  North Cape Breton and Victoria (Nova Scotia)
October 26, 1908 - July 29, 1911
LIB
  North Cape Breton and Victoria (Nova Scotia)
September 21, 1911 - October 6, 1917
LIB
  North Cape Breton and Victoria (Nova Scotia)
December 17, 1917 - October 4, 1921
L LIB
  North Cape Breton and Victoria (Nova Scotia)
  • Leader of the Official Opposition (February 17, 1919 - August 7, 1919)
December 6, 1921 - December 28, 1921
LIB
  North Cape Breton and Victoria (Nova Scotia)
January 19, 1922 - April 10, 1923
LIB
  North Cape Breton and Victoria (Nova Scotia)
  • Solicitor General of Canada (December 29, 1921 - April 10, 1923)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 2 of 1097)


March 8, 1923

Mr. McKENZIE:

Yes, it will be accurate. I know the place very well and the necessity exists for this work. It is not in my own riding, it is in the fair county of Inverness which is part of Cape Breton Island. My hon. friend will easily find out, as far as coal is concerned, that the northern coast of the county of Inverness from Port Hood to Cheti-camp, about fifty miles, is one solid mass of coal, as yet undeveloped, and we have no railway there-for which I am sure my hon. friend will be sorry-except for a distance of thirty-five miles from Canso down to the town of Inverness. The rest of the coast, covering about twenty-five miles, has no railway at all. The mine in question, although not large, is shipping considerable coal to Prince Edward Island, the distance from Chimney Corner to that market being comparatively short-some thirty miles. The development that is now going on at Chimney Comer is small because there is no harbour. This breakwater is to serve the purpose of a harbour. When the breakwater is extended there will be shelter for vessels coming, in there, and I can assure my hon. friend that, for the protection of the fishermen and the people generally who have to do business at that place, fishing and mining, the extension of this breakwater is most important.

Topic:   "QUESTIONS PASSED AS ORDERS FOR RETURNS"
Subtopic:   PUBLIC WORKS-HARBOURS AND RIVERS
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March 8, 1923

Mr. McKENZIE:

It answers both purposes. There is nothing to laugh at, I can assure my hon. friend. I see my western friend, who is strong on wheat boards and the expenditure

FMr. J. H. King.]

of money in the West laughs vociferously, at the idea of a few dollars being spent on the coast of the Atlantic to protect our fisheries. I stand up here proudly to say that there is the strongest possible necessity for these developments, and all I have to say is that not enough of this kind of work is being done.

Topic:   "QUESTIONS PASSED AS ORDERS FOR RETURNS"
Subtopic:   PUBLIC WORKS-HARBOURS AND RIVERS
Full View Permalink

March 8, 1923

Mr. McKENZIE:

If the hon. member appeals to me for information about the matter-

Topic:   "QUESTIONS PASSED AS ORDERS FOR RETURNS"
Subtopic:   PUBLIC WORKS-HARBOURS AND RIVERS
Full View Permalink

March 2, 1923

Mr. McKENZIE:

Any bituminous coal will suffer more or less when exposed to rain and

Supply-Trade and Commerce

sun. Much will depend upon how long the coal is left out under the weather. If covered up in some sort of a shed this slacking process will not happen at all. If that process takes place it is due to the influence of rain, frost, hot sun and so forth which disintegrates the coal. But even if Nova Scotia coal slacks it is a good fuel. It is not as nice to handle, but you can get a fierce fire, a good heat, out of slack; it never gets to the stage where it is not heat producing.

Washed coal, for the purpose of making steel is treated in washing plants. That means that the coal is ground into what may be called very poor slack, and then it goes through a washing process. Of course you would not use washed coal for heating your house but it gives the best kind of heat in the making of steel. I have been living in the neighbourhood of coal mines all my life and I never saw any Nova Scotia coal that could not be used for heating purposes if used under anything like favourable conditions.

Topic:   PRIVATE BILLS
Subtopic:   SECOND READINGS
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March 2, 1923

Mr. McKENZIE:

Get another grade.

Topic:   PRIVATE BILLS
Subtopic:   SECOND READINGS
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