Stéphane DION

DION, The Hon. Stéphane, P.C., B.A., M.A., Ph.D.

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
Saint-Laurent (Quebec)
Birth Date
September 28, 1955
Website
http://stephanedion.liberal.ca/en
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=6bde42a3-d07c-4c1f-b9d4-9e14a124f465&Language=E&Section=ALL
Email Address
stephane.dion@parl.gc.ca
Profession
author, professor of political science

Parliamentary Career

March 25, 1996 - April 27, 1997
LIB
  Saint-Laurent--Cartierville (Quebec)
  • President of the Queen's Privy Council (January 25, 1996 - December 11, 2003)
  • Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs (January 25, 1996 - December 11, 2003)
June 2, 1997 - October 22, 2000
LIB
  Saint-Laurent--Cartierville (Quebec)
  • President of the Queen's Privy Council (January 25, 1996 - December 11, 2003)
  • Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs (January 25, 1996 - December 11, 2003)
November 27, 2000 - May 23, 2004
LIB
  Saint-Laurent--Cartierville (Quebec)
  • President of the Queen's Privy Council (January 25, 1996 - December 11, 2003)
  • Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs (January 25, 1996 - December 11, 2003)
June 28, 2004 - November 29, 2005
LIB
  Saint-Laurent--Cartierville (Quebec)
  • Minister of the Environment (July 20, 2004 - February 5, 2006)
January 23, 2006 - September 7, 2008
LIB
  Saint-Laurent--Cartierville (Quebec)
  • Minister of the Environment (July 20, 2004 - February 5, 2006)
  • Leader of the Official Opposition (December 2, 2006 - December 9, 2008)
October 14, 2008 - March 26, 2011
LIB
  Saint-Laurent--Cartierville (Quebec)
  • Leader of the Official Opposition (December 2, 2006 - December 9, 2008)
May 2, 2011 - August 2, 2015
LIB
  Saint-Laurent--Cartierville (Quebec)
October 19, 2015 -
LIB
  Saint-Laurent (Quebec)
  • Minister of Foreign Affairs (November 4, 2015 - )

Most Recent Speeches (Page 459 of 460)


April 16, 1996

Hon. Stéphane Dion (President of the Queen's Privy Council for Canada and Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, what is this I hear? Acknowledging Quebec's difference would be meaningless? What the opposition fears is that we might manage to reconcile Quebecers and Canadians so that they

may join together in the same country to face the formidable challenges of the 21st century.

Topic:   Oral Question Period
Subtopic:   Distinct Society
Full View Permalink

April 15, 1996

Hon. Stéphane Dion (President of the Queen's Privy Council for Canada and Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, this is the first question asked of me as a member of Parliament, and I must thank the hon. member for it.

Anyone wishing to properly describe public opinion in Quebec is obliged to admit it is not a society in unanimity, but a society where various opinions are voiced. The best way to illustrate this is with a poll that came out a week before the referendum. Quebecers were asked how they defined themselves. Twenty-five per cent said they defined themselves as Quebecers only, and all the rest defined themselves as Canadians, many of them as Quebecers first, because they felt more at home in Quebec, but Canadians also.

These people are Canadians. The hon. member would like them to stop being Canadians, and that is where the problem lies. The answer is this: in Quebec we have differing opinions, but the large

majority of Quebecers want to remain in Canada. We are going to work to ensure that everyone in Canada may be reconciled.

Topic:   Oral Question Period
Subtopic:   Distinct Society
Full View Permalink

April 15, 1996

Hon. Stéphane Dion (President of the Queen's Privy Council for Canada and Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, I am not much versed in how things are done here, but if I understand the hon. member correctly, he wishes me to repeat what I said, because he did not understand it fully.

Topic:   Oral Question Period
Subtopic:   Distinct Society
Full View Permalink

April 15, 1996

Mr. Dion

I thought I had been very clear. We have a pluralistic society in Quebec, one in which a number of different points of view are expressed, one in which people need to be left to define themselves as they wish. Some wish to define themselves as primarily Quebecers, others as primarily Canadians, and what is so wonderful in Canadian federation is that no one forces anything on anyone else.

Topic:   Oral Question Period
Subtopic:   Distinct Society
Full View Permalink

April 15, 1996

Hon. Stéphane Dion (Saint-Laurent-Cartierville, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, we must state the facts.

Since the beginning, since 1988, the intent to put in the Constitution the recognition of Quebec has never been a device to change the distribution of powers in the Constitution of Canada.

Never. Some politicians who do not want to reconcile Quebecers and Canadians may say that but it is not the truth. I will give you what was written in 1987, the first draft the first ministers accepted in order to keep Quebec as a distinct society, or any other term you want to use within Canada.

"Nothing in this section derogates from the powers, rights or privileges of Parliament or the Government of Canada or the legislatures of the governments of the provinces, including any powers, rights or privileges relating to language". This is why it would be a lie to say that it may change the distribution of powers. It is an interpretative clause. It is necessary but it does not change the basic Constitution.

Topic:   Oral Question Period
Subtopic:   The Constitution
Full View Permalink