Stéphane DION

DION, The Hon. Stéphane, P.C., B.A., M.A., Ph.D.

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
Saint-Laurent (Quebec)
Birth Date
September 28, 1955
Website
http://stephanedion.liberal.ca/en
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=6bde42a3-d07c-4c1f-b9d4-9e14a124f465&Language=E&Section=ALL
Email Address
stephane.dion@parl.gc.ca
Profession
author, professor of political science

Parliamentary Career

March 25, 1996 - April 27, 1997
LIB
  Saint-Laurent--Cartierville (Quebec)
  • President of the Queen's Privy Council (January 25, 1996 - December 11, 2003)
  • Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs (January 25, 1996 - December 11, 2003)
June 2, 1997 - October 22, 2000
LIB
  Saint-Laurent--Cartierville (Quebec)
  • President of the Queen's Privy Council (January 25, 1996 - December 11, 2003)
  • Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs (January 25, 1996 - December 11, 2003)
November 27, 2000 - May 23, 2004
LIB
  Saint-Laurent--Cartierville (Quebec)
  • President of the Queen's Privy Council (January 25, 1996 - December 11, 2003)
  • Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs (January 25, 1996 - December 11, 2003)
June 28, 2004 - November 29, 2005
LIB
  Saint-Laurent--Cartierville (Quebec)
  • Minister of the Environment (July 20, 2004 - February 5, 2006)
January 23, 2006 - September 7, 2008
LIB
  Saint-Laurent--Cartierville (Quebec)
  • Minister of the Environment (July 20, 2004 - February 5, 2006)
  • Leader of the Official Opposition (December 2, 2006 - December 9, 2008)
October 14, 2008 - March 26, 2011
LIB
  Saint-Laurent--Cartierville (Quebec)
  • Leader of the Official Opposition (December 2, 2006 - December 9, 2008)
May 2, 2011 - August 2, 2015
LIB
  Saint-Laurent--Cartierville (Quebec)
October 19, 2015 -
LIB
  Saint-Laurent (Quebec)
  • Minister of Foreign Affairs (November 4, 2015 - )

Most Recent Speeches (Page 3 of 460)


December 12, 2016

Hon. Stéphane Dion (Minister of Foreign Affairs, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, I want to assure my colleague that the premise of his question is completely false. Canada is engaging in peacekeeping around the world because it wants to promote peace, nothing more. No need to laugh at that. It is Canada's fundamental responsibility. I am sure that the opposition is going to stop taking this lightly. It is quite serious.

It is about promoting peace and we are going to do that with courage and determination because that is what we have always done in the past and that is what we will continue to do in the future, certainly under the leadership of this Prime Minister.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Foreign Affairs
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December 2, 2016

Hon. Stéphane Dion (Minister of Foreign Affairs, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, with regard to (a), through Russia’s occupation and purported annexation of the Autonomous Republic of Crimea and the city of Sevastopol, hereinafter “Crimea”, Russia violated the Charter of the United Nations, in particular article 2(4), which states the following:

All Members shall refrain in their international relations from the threat or use of force against the territorial integrity or political independence of any state, or in any other manner inconsistent with the Purposes of the United Nations.

Russia’s actions in Ukraine have violated and continue to violate the sovereignty and territorial integrity of Ukraine. This obligation was reached by the UN General Assembly, UNGA, in Resolution 68/262 of March 27, 2014, passed by a majority of members, including Canada. Canada does not and will not recognize the illegal annexation of Crimea, which it considers an integral part of Ukraine. Canada continues to deplore the violations of Ukraine’s sovereignty by Russia and its destabilizing activities in eastern Ukraine, in breach of security assurances provided in the 1994 Budapest Memorandum and not respecting the rights of the people of occupied Crimea by imposing Russian laws, and that Russia has violated the rights of minorities, particularly the Crimean Tatars.

With regard to (b), Russia is not a state party to the Rome Statute, which established the International Criminal Court, and neither is Ukraine. The court has launched a preliminary examination of the situation in Ukraine, including in Crimea and Donbas, with a view to determining whether the opening of a formal investigation is warranted. There is no other international criminal court that has jurisdiction to prosecute individuals for crimes committed in Ukraine.

In order to maintain pressure on Russia until it fully complies with its international obligations with respect to Ukraine, on November 28, 2016, the special economic measures regulations in regard to Ukraine have been amended to list 15 additional individuals, including six members of Russia’s State Duma from Crimea, who are subject to an asset freeze and dealings prohibition. These sanctions are in response to the September 18 election of officials residing in Crimea to Russia’s State Duma. Canada does not support the legitimacy or the outcome of these elections held in the occupied Crimean peninsula, as it has never recognized Russia’s illegal annexation of Ukraine’s Autonomous Republic of Crimea and the city of Sevastopol.

The Government of Canada also announced on July 8, 2016, that it will deploy Canadian troops in Latvia, supporting security and stability efforts for Ukraine. This is Canada`s most significant contribution to NATO in decades, and will help deter Russian aggression.

With regard to (c), please refer to answer (b).

With regard to (d), the ICC may impose penalties on a person convicted of a crime under its jurisdiction per article 77 of the Rome Statute: http://legal.un.org/icc/statute/romefra.htm

Topic:   Routine Proceedings
Subtopic:   Questions on the Order Paper
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December 1, 2016

Hon. Stéphane Dion

Mr. Speaker, I will agree with my colleague that the policy of engagement with Cuba had been done under Conservative and Liberal governments, and it was the right thing to do. It is much better than an embargo.

Isolation is rarely a solution to improve the situation of people in a country. Engagement and frank dialogue is the policy we must follow. I thank God that we have not used the tone that many of my Conservative colleagues have used in the House to describe the situation with Cuba, because that would endanger our ability to have a positive result in Cuba.

I would mention to my colleague that almost all world leaders have been very careful to insist on the positive aspects when Fidel Castro passed away. None of them, as far as I know, has taken this opportunity to mention the fact that he was a dictator. However, that being the case, we need to improve the human rights situation in Cuba. The only way to do so is to have diplomacy, the wise and firm diplomacy I just described, and not to shoot from the sidelines, like my Conservative colleagues would like us to do.

Topic:   Government Orders
Subtopic:   Business of Supply
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December 1, 2016

Hon. Stéphane Dion

Mr. Speaker, I share my colleague’s view that today the official opposition wants to carry on a debate that is not warranted. We should all strive to help the Cuban people achieve reconciliation and work together to provide a better future for their children, rather than stir up old conflicts surrounding Fidel Castro. I completely agree with that.

As for the problem she just raised, I am well aware of it, Canada contributes 10% of the budget. There was a rather serious financial crisis a few months ago. It appears to have subsided, and Canada will be there to make sure that things go smoothly.

Topic:   Government Orders
Subtopic:   Business of Supply
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December 1, 2016

Hon. Stéphane Dion

Mr. Speaker, you can see why Canadians want to have a diplomacy that makes sense and that helps the world to progress instead of antagonizing, instead of belligerence, it is completely sterile for what we intend to do. Of course, there are huge problems in Cuba regarding human rights. Of course it was a dictatorship with Fidel Castro, we do not dispute that. Now the goal is to see how the reforms may lead Cuba toward democracy and where universal human rights will be respected. The fact that Canada engaged Cuba despite disagreement with the regime is the key way by which our Prime Minister, our government, and the whole of Canada will be able to be an asset for this endeavour in this journey toward freedom and democracy.

Topic:   Government Orders
Subtopic:   Business of Supply
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