Stéphane DION

DION, The Hon. Stéphane, P.C., B.A., M.A., Ph.D.

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
Saint-Laurent (Quebec)
Birth Date
September 28, 1955
Website
http://stephanedion.liberal.ca/en
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=6bde42a3-d07c-4c1f-b9d4-9e14a124f465&Language=E&Section=ALL
Email Address
stephane.dion@parl.gc.ca
Profession
author, professor of political science

Parliamentary Career

March 25, 1996 - April 27, 1997
LIB
  Saint-Laurent--Cartierville (Quebec)
  • President of the Queen's Privy Council (January 25, 1996 - December 11, 2003)
  • Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs (January 25, 1996 - December 11, 2003)
June 2, 1997 - October 22, 2000
LIB
  Saint-Laurent--Cartierville (Quebec)
  • President of the Queen's Privy Council (January 25, 1996 - December 11, 2003)
  • Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs (January 25, 1996 - December 11, 2003)
November 27, 2000 - May 23, 2004
LIB
  Saint-Laurent--Cartierville (Quebec)
  • President of the Queen's Privy Council (January 25, 1996 - December 11, 2003)
  • Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs (January 25, 1996 - December 11, 2003)
June 28, 2004 - November 29, 2005
LIB
  Saint-Laurent--Cartierville (Quebec)
  • Minister of the Environment (July 20, 2004 - February 5, 2006)
January 23, 2006 - September 7, 2008
LIB
  Saint-Laurent--Cartierville (Quebec)
  • Minister of the Environment (July 20, 2004 - February 5, 2006)
  • Leader of the Official Opposition (December 2, 2006 - December 9, 2008)
October 14, 2008 - March 26, 2011
LIB
  Saint-Laurent--Cartierville (Quebec)
  • Leader of the Official Opposition (December 2, 2006 - December 9, 2008)
May 2, 2011 - August 2, 2015
LIB
  Saint-Laurent--Cartierville (Quebec)
October 19, 2015 -
LIB
  Saint-Laurent (Quebec)
  • Minister of Foreign Affairs (November 4, 2015 - )

Most Recent Speeches (Page 1 of 460)


January 31, 2017

Hon. Stéphane Dion (Saint-Laurent, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, as someone who grew up in Quebec City and who is proud of the Muslim community in his riding, I denounce ignorance and hate, which cut lives tragically short. I mourn for the victims, express my sympathy to their families and loved ones, wish a speedy recovery to those who were injured, and congratulate the police for arresting the alleged perpetrator of these senseless killings.

Since this is the last time that I will rise in the House after having had the honour of representing the magnificent communities of Saint-Laurent and Cartierville for 21 years, I would like to take the opportunity to make a last plea for the cause that I have served with all my might, that of a united, more prosperous, fairer, and greener Canada that plays its proper role in the world.

Our country is a world treasure. Canada is as big as a continent and awe-inspiringly beautiful. We enjoy among the highest quality of life of any country, with two international languages recognized as our official languages, a strong indigenous people who remind us of our history, and a multicultural population that allows us to influence the world. Our roots are in Europe, we form part of the Americas, and we are open to Asia. We have never deployed our brave troops abroad for any reason other than to courageously serve the causes of peace, democracy, and justice. For all of these reasons, billions of people see Canada as a universal ideal of openness, tolerance, and generosity, and we must always strive to live up to that image.

In order to be effective in our pursuit of that ideal, we need to draw on our linguistic duality, which was forged by our history and is essential to our future. The French language is also key to our future success.

My dear colleagues, let us do our part by choosing party leaders that can speak both official languages.

In order to be effective in our pursuit of the Canadian ideal, we need the full participation of Quebeckers. We Quebeckers worked alongside other Canadians to build this country from the ground up. Quebec's autonomy and a federalism that respects provincial jurisdiction are important, but we also need to share Quebec's know-how with the rest of Canada.

If anyone were to try to force us once more into the grave mistake of choosing between our two wonderful identities as Canadians and Quebeckers instead of embracing them both, it would have to be with clarity, under the rule of law, under our constitutional framework, with a desire for justice for all. Those are the fundamental rights protected by the 1998 Supreme Court opinion and by the Clarity Act that gave it effect. However, I am convinced that, as Quebeckers, we will always also choose to remain Canadians.

To come closer to this ideal that Canada represents in the world which I have just described in French, we need to build on our democracy's pluralism and our political parties' respective strengths. The Liberal Party, which I had the honour to once lead, strives to reconcile economic, social, and environmental challenges, rather than placing them in conflict. The Liberal Party believes that economic growth comes from more social justice, not less, and more effective environmental policies, not less. Canada must be at the forefront of this fight which is so vital for the future of humanity, finding the path of inclusive growth and sustainable development.

We need more Canada. We hear that all over the world. I am proud to have contributed my voice this past year to our country's role as a determined peace builder, defending our own interests and those of our allies, and promoting everywhere the universal value that all human beings, regardless of their nationality, are entitled to the same dignity.

Those are the battles I have fought for my country as a parliamentarian for 21 years. I can never adequately thank those who gave me the opportunity to do so. If I had the time, I would name them all: prime ministers, colleagues, associates, constituents. However, let me just name my family, Janine and Jeanne, who have made enormous sacrifices and to whom I owe everything.

In recent weeks, I have had to choose between my two passions, teaching and public service. My thanks go to the Université de Montréal for offering me a visiting professorship under really outstanding conditions. I very nearly said yes, because, in my eyes, there is no finer calling than that of teacher. However, within these walls, I do not need to explain the addicting rush of adrenaline that comes from action, or to describe how irresistible is the call of public service, especially when that call comes from one's Prime Minister.

This is all the more so because of the large responsibility the Prime Minister has offered me. I am pleased to say, after the MP for Markham—Thornhill—

Topic:   Routine Proceedings
Subtopic:   Resignation of Members
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December 14, 2016

Hon. Stéphane Dion (Minister of Foreign Affairs, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, that is the same question so I will give the same answer. It is very important that the Government of Canada be open and transparent about this fundamental decision to send our troops to support the cause of peace, as they always have. Canada is one of the few countries in the world that has never sent its troops abroad for reasons other than to protect democracy, peace, and justice. That is what we will do, and we will provide all the information to Canadians, because they have a right to know what is happening.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Foreign Affairs
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December 14, 2016

Hon. Stéphane Dion (Minister of Foreign Affairs, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, my colleague is completely right. This is a very serious decision. It must be taken very seriously and in a comprehensive way. Where the member is in contradiction with himself is by asking me to do that in the next 10 seconds that I am allowed in the House.

No, it will be done properly, in due time, with true transparency, and will show how much Canada will honour its commitment for peace.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Foreign Affairs
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December 14, 2016

Hon. Stéphane Dion (Minister of Foreign Affairs, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, the government does not export the same kind of weapons to Saudi Arabia as the United States did. The weapons in that case were air to ground bombs. We condemn the repeated, senseless attacks in Yemen, including the recent horrific attack on a funeral home. These violations of international law and humanitarian law are tragic and unacceptable.

Obviously, we have denounced those actions repeatedly, and we are not part of the the Saudi coalition. We want Saudi Arabia to honour its international obligations.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Foreign Affairs
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December 14, 2016

Hon. Stéphane Dion (Minister of Foreign Affairs, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, at the end of this year Amnesty International has come out with a report card about what we have done for human rights during the year. It says that Canada has offered an encouraging example to the world of the importance and value of embracing human rights. There have been major advances, giving greater priority to human rights in Canadian foreign policy, including championing a strong gender-equality agenda, and making human rights part of the annual performance review for Canada. It also said—

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Foreign Affairs
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