Henry Alfred MULLINS

MULLINS, The Hon. Henry Alfred

Personal Data

Party
Conservative (1867-1942)
Constituency
Marquette (Manitoba)
Birth Date
August 27, 1861
Deceased Date
July 8, 1952
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Mullins
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=6aec5fc3-848c-47c3-b70d-cae7c56afa99&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
exporter, farmer

Parliamentary Career

October 29, 1925 - July 2, 1926
CON
  Marquette (Manitoba)
July 28, 1930 - August 14, 1935
CON
  Marquette (Manitoba)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 3 of 83)


May 27, 1935

Mr. MULLINS:

Well, I was going to use a strong word but I will hold it back; I will not use the western term I might use to describe what they have done to the live stock industry. They are to blame for the present situation and no one else. They have

killed the industry, and that is why the cars are empty. One freight traffic manager told me that they lost money on live stock. I asked him in what way and he said it was because they had to haul empty cars back. I can remember that in the old days every other siding between here and Winnipeg had a stock train on it. I can remember when hundreds of thousands of dollars went back into that western country. But you go west to-day and look at the sidings and you will see nothing but empty stock cars. It is about time the railways recognized the benefits of the live stock industry to traffic and assisted that industry by doing something in regard to the stop-over charge and also by providing proper accommodation. Let the railways put the rates back where they were. I had the honour of Shipping cattle on the first train that left Winnipeg, but to-day the rates are twenty per cent higher than they were at that time. They say that labour is to blame; I say it is not. You have a crew of five on the train and they are drawing seventy cars. Locomotives are pulling as high as seventy cars of live stock out of Winnipeg with a crew of only five, and though it is true that slightly more is paid in wages we must consider the tonnage that is hauled. We cannot therefore place the responsibility on labour; that excuse will not hold. The fault is with the shortsighted policy of those who sit in the offices in Montreal. They are the ones that dictate the policy which has put the cattle men out of business-I mean the legitimate cattle men and not those gentlemen who become cattle men over night. These men who buy a truck and go into the cattle business are pretty well known in the neighbourhood, and they get hold of the farmer's cattle and undertake to sell them though they do not know the first thing about the business. They are marks for the men in the stock yards who buy for the packers. It makes me wonder when I stand and1 look at the trucks going to the western cattle markets. I was told that 3,600 cars of cattle were moved to the Toronto stock yards by truck. This I admit is the line of least resistance, because it is easier for the farmer to load his cattle on the truck than to drive them to the station, there being so many motor cars on the highway. It is difficult to drive a herd of cattle, but I notice now that they have done away with that menace. Those legislators in Winnipeg, the solons who make the laws there, are permitting the cattle to run on the highways, endangering the lives of people, so that there is not so much danger now in driving a

Public Worics Program

herd of cattle when cattle are allowed to run free on the highways in Manitoba. Motorists are more careful.

As to partitions, I quite agree with the hon. member for Southeast Grey. I think they should provide partitions so that they might take mixed shipments. I speak from experience of many years and I think I should know something of what I am talking about. I am out of the business now so that I have no axe to grind, and I make this statement only in the interests of the legitimate live stock dealers, the few who are left in the country. I say that the only method which will make for success in the cattle industry is the old method; let us have the old time cattle dealer and the old time fairs at country points. In the town of Birtle, Manitoba, they held a fair on one occasion, and they had 338 head of cattle which were sold right in the town at good prices without having to be moved at all. That is the method that should be followed; let the cattle be sold on the farm or to the cattle dealer and brought into market, doing away with the so-called cattle men who have trucks running over the highways and ruining them without contributing to the success of the industry.

Topic:   PUBLIC WORKS PROGRAM
Subtopic:   WORKS, 'UNDERTAKINGS AND GUARANTEE OP RAILWAY EQUIPMENT SECURITIES TO CREATE EMPLOYMENT
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May 27, 1935

Mr. MULLINS:

I congratulate the hon. member for Southeast Grey (Miss Macphail) on the contribution she has made to the live stock industry. The railways are responsible for the state the industry is in to-day. The trucks came into use as a result of railway rates on live stock. The rates are to-day twenty per -cent higher all over western 'Canada from local points and for through shipments. Only yesterday, coming down on the train from Toronto, I drew to the attention of the representative of the Globe, Mr. Anderson, and of my hon. friend from Parkdale (Mr. Spence) the number of live stock cars standing idle on the sidings, owing largely to the fact that trucks were operating. The trucks have ruined the cattle industry because they have put the old cattle dealer out of business; he is not in evidence. The live stock industry has been ruined on that account. As regards the stop-over charges, the hon. member for Southeast Grey is absolutely right. I took this question up with one of the railway officials in Montreal, pointing out the injury that the stop-over charge had done. I said that a man might have a half car at one station and desire to fill it up at another, for which they charged $3. Their charge is excessive on live stock. And then they have the-

Topic:   PUBLIC WORKS PROGRAM
Subtopic:   WORKS, 'UNDERTAKINGS AND GUARANTEE OP RAILWAY EQUIPMENT SECURITIES TO CREATE EMPLOYMENT
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April 10, 1935

Mr. MULLINS:

-and he took a lot of

money from the people of Medicine Hat. I do not think he was in the Swift Current district but he operated at Medicine Hat and he was a failure, just like the man they imported named Sapiro. All these novices have been imported in the west, but the spirit of the old pioneer will prevail. My hon. friend is one of the pioneers and I always like to shake hands with him. We have faced the elements, we have fought drought before, and we have asked nothing from anybody. I say therefore that the same spirit will bring that country back. I would not waste any money unnecessarily until we see what the conditions really are. I have lived out there and I believe that this will be a wet year.

Topic:   REHABILITATION OF DROUGHT AREAS
Subtopic:   DEMONSTRATION AREAS AND INVESTIGATIONAL
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April 10, 1935

Mr. MULLINS:

Mr. Chairman, I have listened to the various speeches made this afternoon, especially those by the hon. member for Swift Current (Mr. Bothwell) the hon. member for Lisgar (Mr. Brown), and the hon. member for Souris (Mr. Willis). I am inclined to agree with the hon. member for Lisgar. He goes back to the days of experience, and experience is what is needed at a time like this. My sympathy goes out to the

Rehabilitation oj Drought Areas

people in and around Swift Current. It does not seem like so many years ago-in reality it goes back many years-when they undertook to grow grain in that district, but their efforts were an absolute failure. I remember Sir Lester Kaye who owned 10,000 acres around Swift Current. He imported water carts and undertook to water the grain. Any old timer from that district wild remember the circumstances quite well. There was no rain there; it never rained, and they imported rain makers and tried in every way to get water because it was impossible to grow grain. My sympathy goes out therefore to those people who went there to farm. I remember the drought referred to by the hon. member for Lisgar-the drought that occurred in 1885. It was a serious one and the pioneers at that time suffered and bore it; they fought it. But I say for the benefit of this house that this is the end of the seven years; we have had the seven years, and I do not think that next year you will want any water conservation. I believe that next year we shall have two crops in one. We have had two crops in one in that western country, and I can tell you that there is all the difference in the world between having rain on the land and not having it. Soil drifting? Yes; but give us a year such as we are looking for this year and, with the faith of the old pioneers in that western country, we shall come back in the west and we shall not need to ask the minister for any expenditures for the conservation of water because we shall have enough of it. We have not suffered so much in the constituency I represent though we have had years when we could have done with more water; we should like to have had more rain. However, my sympathy goes out to the hon. member for Swift Current (Mr. Both-well), because I do not believe that is a farming country. It is on the tail end of the chinook belt. I have seen the grass dry, I have seen it cured in June, and I do not know for the life of me how any man could ever farm on that land.

Topic:   REHABILITATION OF DROUGHT AREAS
Subtopic:   DEMONSTRATION AREAS AND INVESTIGATIONAL
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April 10, 1935

Mr. MULLINS:

It has; but may I ask the hon. member how many years in ten.

Topic:   REHABILITATION OF DROUGHT AREAS
Subtopic:   DEMONSTRATION AREAS AND INVESTIGATIONAL
Full View Permalink