Max SALTSMAN

SALTSMAN, Max

Personal Data

Party
New Democratic Party
Constituency
Waterloo--Cambridge (Ontario)
Birth Date
May 29, 1921
Deceased Date
November 28, 1985
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Max_Saltsman
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=6ab1d342-3030-459c-9751-639f09fada02&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
business manager, businessman, professor (assistant)

Parliamentary Career

November 9, 1964 - September 8, 1965
NDP
  Waterloo South (Ontario)
November 8, 1965 - April 23, 1968
NDP
  Waterloo South (Ontario)
June 25, 1968 - September 1, 1972
NDP
  Waterloo (Ontario)
October 30, 1972 - May 9, 1974
NDP
  Waterloo (Ontario)
July 8, 1974 - March 26, 1979
NDP
  Waterloo--Cambridge (Ontario)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 1 of 420)


December 5, 1978

Mr. Max Saltsman (Waterloo-Cambridge):

Mr. Speaker, I would like to direct my question to the Minister of Finance: it is in connection with the worsening unemployment figures which were released today.

Since the minister does not seem to have any concrete proposals to put forward to reduce the level of unemployment in Canada, and since unemployment in the Ottawa-Hull area has increased almost 30 per cent in one month as a result of government cutbacks, would the government reconsider its policy and put off the cutbacks in order to ensure that we do not reach double-digit unemployment in the winter months?

[ Translation]

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   FINANCE
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December 5, 1978

Mr. Saltsman:

Mr. Speaker, it is quite clear that whatever the intentions of the government were, its policies are not working, unemployment is increasing and it looks as if it will continue to increase. Just to give the minister another figure from the labour force statistics which were released today- rather startling statistics-the service sector lost 22,000 jobs in November.

As this is unquestionably a result of the reduction in consumer spending, at the very least will the government reconsider its position to withdraw the $250 million in purchasing power from the economy in the first months of 1979 as a result of the reduction in family allowance payments from $28 to $20? Will the government at least defer that proposal in order to ensure purchasing power is maintained at a high level?

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   FINANCE
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November 29, 1978

Mr. Saltsman:

Mr. Speaker, a supplementary question. Perhaps I might ask the Deputy Prime Minister a question that will not require any authentication.

In view of the fact that, according to the council's report, over-all profits in the food industry increased 63 per cent in the last six months, and since individual food companies such as Weston's, with a 113 per cent profit increase, and Burns Foods with a 199 per cent increase in profit, are profiteering off the Canadian consumer, will the minister request these companies to rescind their food increases?

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   CONSUMER AFFAIRS
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November 29, 1978

Mr. Max Saltsman (Waterloo-Cambridge):

Mr. Speaker, I have a question for the Minister of Consumer and Corporate Affairs, but in his absence perhaps I could direct it to the Deputy Prime Minister.

Yesterday's Economic Council of Canada report stated that the rapid increase in food prices can be attributed to soaring profits for food and beverage manufacturers. Since I have received a secret cabinet document dated June 20, entitled "Possible Response to Food Price Increases", may 1 ask the minister if he can indicate to the House why the government has reneged on its responsibilities, as indicated in that document, to take action to prevent rising food prices and profits?

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   CONSUMER AFFAIRS
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November 17, 1978

Mr. Saltsman:

I added my last comment because I was very much afraid that someone might bring up something I said 12 years ago. I was afraid someone would have it tucked up his sleeve, ready to trot out before the House.

Recently the government announced that it was going to cut back on public services. The Prime Minister came out with a great big axe in his hand. I presume he did not tell anyone about it. He came out looking like Henry VIII, chopping off ladies' heads, and saying, "Off with their heads, off with their heads". In the meantime, the heads are not rolling rapidly, nor should they roll rapidly. By the time you get through that exercise you really have not changed very much.

There is room and there is need for scrutiny in the public sector. All of us have some private and pet horror stories about what goes on in the public sector, or all of us should have, and some of us have stories about what goes on in the private sector. These things can only be handled on a day to day and consistent basis with a determination to make the public sector work. This is part of the problem.

If you wonder why bureaucracy is the way it is, and why there is less concern about the public sector than there should be, it is because governments, federal governments at any rate, up until the present time have had a kind of death wish. Sometimes one feels it really does not want the public sector to work. Like my friend, the hon. member for York-Simcoe, instead of putting their very considerable talents to work trying to figure out how to make Petro-Can of more service to the Canadian people, hon. members are busily trying to destroy Petro-Can. Like that hon. member, hon. members in that part of the House do not want Petro-Can to work because that would put a lie to the belief which is currently popular among members of the Conservative party. I say "currently" because things were not always that way. Many good endeavours have come from the Conservative party in its better days.

One of the great challenges of the future is not so much related to whether there should be more or less public involvement. I do not think it is possible any more in the kind of world we live in, and with the kind of future we foresee, for the government to get out of involvement in the economy. No government can divorce itself from that involvement. Quite to the contrary, there is an increasing need for the government to be involved in managing the economy. What is critical is not the extent to which the government is involved in the economy, but the extent to which people in public life ensure that the public sector always performs efficiently and humanely.

Because of our concern about the need for public investment and government leadership in the public sector, I move,

November 17, 1978

seconded by the hon. member for Winnipeg North Centre (Mr. Knowles)-

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   THE BUDGET
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