Jim ABBOTT

ABBOTT, The Hon. Jim, P.C.

Personal Data

Party
Conservative
Constituency
Kootenay--Columbia (British Columbia)
Birth Date
August 18, 1942
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jim_Abbott_(politician)
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=697d21ec-83f6-4af1-b5b7-cfe7ffd095ea&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
businessman, manager

Parliamentary Career

October 25, 1993 - April 27, 1997
REF
  Kootenay East (British Columbia)
June 2, 1997 - October 22, 2000
REF
  Kootenay--Columbia (British Columbia)
March 27, 2000 - October 22, 2000
CA
  Kootenay--Columbia (British Columbia)
November 27, 2000 - May 23, 2004
CA
  Kootenay--Columbia (British Columbia)
December 23, 2003 - May 23, 2004
CPC
  Kootenay--Columbia (British Columbia)
June 28, 2004 - November 29, 2005
CPC
  Kootenay--Columbia (British Columbia)
January 23, 2006 - September 7, 2008
CPC
  Kootenay--Columbia (British Columbia)
  • Parliamentary Secretary for Canadian Heritage (February 7, 2006 - November 6, 2008)
October 14, 2008 - March 26, 2011
CPC
  Kootenay--Columbia (British Columbia)
  • Parliamentary Secretary for Canadian Heritage (February 7, 2006 - November 6, 2008)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of International Cooperation (November 7, 2008 - November 4, 2010)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 1 of 316)


March 24, 2011

Hon. Jim Abbott (Kootenay—Columbia, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, I rise today to speak about the greatest job, the greatest people and the greatest country. Being a member of Parliament, we have access to decision-making and decision-makers, national and international. The experience of being a member of Parliament is as big as this world.

I am thankful to our Prime Minister for my appointment to the Privy Council and for his confidence in me in the task that he had appointed to me.

I am thankful for the support and confidence of my constituents since 1993.

I am thankful for the support of my assistants here today in the chamber, Krissy and Chelsea Côté. Believe it or not, Krissy has been with me all 17.5 years. I am thankful to my assistant in my Cranbrook office, Wendy Kemble. I am particularly thankful to Ken Miller, who got me into this in 1991 and is still with me today as our electoral district president.

I am thankful for the support of my friends in the party, the people who put up the signs in the snowbanks and do the phoning. I would not be so proud as to think that they just support me. They support principle, political principle, and I thank them for that.

Most important, I am thankful to my family, to my wife Jeannette, three children, their spouses and seven grandchildren.

Above all, I am thankful to God for supporting me every day in every way during this period. My faith in Christ is my enduring pillar.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Resignation of Members
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March 7, 2011

Hon. Jim Abbott (Kootenay—Columbia, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, the era of Liberal entitlement lives strong. The Liberals have long held that the rules do not apply to them. Last week, Liberal members stood in the House and attacked my colleague because his former staffer mistakenly used parliamentary resources for partisan purposes.

Yet, we now know that the Liberals in Prince Edward Island have been advertising that constituents can buy Liberal Party memberships in a Liberal member's office. This is out of his taxpayer-funded constituency office. What does he have to say about the abuse? He said that constituency offices are all partly political anyway.

This weekend, that same MP went on the attack again. He said, “This is totally unacceptable...Parliamentary materials are never allowed to be used for political gain, especially to drum up donations for political parties”. Apparently, what is “unacceptable” for others is “acceptable” for him.

Will the member for Charlottetown do the right thing and apologize?

Topic:   Statements By Members
Subtopic:   Political Financing
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February 14, 2011

Hon. Jim Abbott

Madam Speaker, I rise on a point of order. The member has had an admonition, I believe from the Speaker, on this very speech about the fact that he must remain relevant. What he is talking about has nothing whatsoever to do with the topic of debate.

I ask you, Madam Speaker, to ask the member to be at least a bit relevant.

Topic:   Government Orders
Subtopic:   Disposition of Abolition of Early Parole Act
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December 13, 2010

Hon. Jim Abbott (Kootenay—Columbia, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, at the time of these events, I was the parliamentary secretary. At this point, I am simply the member for Kootenay—Columbia.

I do have some information that might be of value.

First, I take note of the three points the member brought to our attention, that the statements were misleading, that the statements were known to be misleading and that the statements were intended to mislead.

If I may, Mr. Speaker, I would like to draw to your attention that at no time in the member's presentation did he make any assertion that the minister made any misleading statements. In fact, I do not doubt for a second that the member, his colleagues and his research people will have combed over every solitary word that the minister may have uttered in the House or outside of the House. I note he did not say that the minister made any statement that misled the House.

With respect to myself, on March 15, I did make the statement that CIDA thoroughly analyzed KAIROS' program proposal and determined that it did not meet the agency's current priorities. For that, I have to apologize to the House. It was an inadvertent mistake on my part. I do apologize. As a person who has been around the House for 17 years, I take that failing on my part very seriously.

Second, the member says that the responses, obviously referring to my responses, because I have clearly determined that the minister's responses were never questioned by the member in his statement just now, were tailored to forward the narrative. This falls into the category of sometimes there is a lot less than meets the eye. In this instance, I was given to the impression that CIDA, as with any agency or any ministry, should take direction from the minister. Had it taken direction from the minister on behalf of the Government of Canada, the recommendation coming to the minister would not have been to recommend. In fact, it would have been against recommending. The fault, then, lies that the agency itself was in fact giving the minister advice that did not reflect the priorities.

I was mistaken. I took a look at the priorities of the government, which by the way I fully support because it gives the government the opportunity to more correctly direct where our funding should go. My presumption on March 15 was that CIDA, as an agency, would have made that recommendation.

If we take a look at it, first, the minister has not been cited with any evidence by the member that she made misleading statements and second, I was wrong, I did make a mistake and I apologize to the House. The second point, though, that I knew they were misleading, I have already clearly stated I could not have known. It was simply a mistake on my part. Third, that I intended to mislead, one follows the other, does it not?

With all due respect to the hon. colleague, the fact is this has been a change in policy that has been unacceptable to him, to KAIROS and to other people in that industry, and so be it. That is part of the political process and part of the discourse that we get into.

In fact, there is no place for a question of privilege other than perhaps, should you, Mr. Speaker, choose to censure me as having been a little bit overzealous in my representation of what I presumed CIDA was going to be doing.

In fact, there is absolutely no case for a question of privilege.

Topic:   Routine Proceedings
Subtopic:   Privilege
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December 6, 2010

Hon. Jim Abbott (Kootenay—Columbia, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, Canada has stood at the forefront of the world when it comes to helping those in need. As Canadians know, our efforts in Afghanistan to improve the lives of the people have been hard fought. In the year 2000, only 9% of the population had access to primary health care. Access to medicine and supplies was virtually non-existent.

Would the Minister of International Cooperation give Canadians an update on some of the improvements we have made to help improve public health in Afghanistan?

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Afghanistan
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