Raymond John FUNK

FUNK, Raymond John, B.A., M.A.

Personal Data

Party
New Democratic Party
Constituency
Prince Albert--Churchill River (Saskatchewan)
Birth Date
February 13, 1948
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ray_Funk
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=6917f225-ed8d-4183-aaf0-872499cbaf35&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
businessman, child care worker, consultant, educator, farmer, researcher

Parliamentary Career

November 21, 1988 - September 8, 1993
NDP
  Prince Albert--Churchill River (Saskatchewan)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 1 of 65)


June 15, 1993

Mr. Ray Funk (Prince Albert-Churchill River):

Madam Speaker, it appears obvious that in spite of all the song and dance about change, about renewal and about inclusion that nothing has changed across the aisle. The corporate giants are still in charge of John Diefenbaker's party.

My supplementaiy question is for the same minister, this time in his role as the minister for co-ops. How can he reconcile his role as an advocate for co-operative principles with his recent decisions on the future of the Canadian Wheat Board and the Crow benefit? He knows full well that these institutions are the pillars which four generations of prairie people have built up in order to maintain a degree of control over their livelihoods and their communities.

How can the minister be advocating policies which are undermining and destroying the very basic idea of organizing society co-operatively which he has sworn an oath to defend within this government?

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   AGRICULTURE
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June 15, 1993

Mr. Ray Funk (Prince Albert-Churchill River):

Madam Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Agriculture.

As far as I know until today the disastrous Order in Council removing barley marketing from the exclusive jurisdiction of the Canadian Wheat Board has not been proclaimed.

Since the Alberta election is today and since the vast majority of prairie farmers are still adamantly opposed to the destruction of the most effective grain marketing system in the world, I would like to ask the minister whether the politics of inclusion, which means listening

Oral Questions

to people, being advocated by his choice for Prime Minister means that he will now let this disastrous Order in Council eroding the power of the Canadian Wheat Board die the natural death it deserves?

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   AGRICULTURE
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June 15, 1993

Mr. Ray Funk (Prince Albert-Churchill River):

Mr. Speaker, it is my honour to present three petitions to the House signed by 800 Canadians from 23 communities including Tbronto and Ottawa in Ontario, Port Albemi, Parksville, Castlegar, Crescent Valley in B.C., as well as Winnipeg, Saskatoon and other communities.

The petitioners call on Parliament to establish a peace trust fund which would allow Canadian taxpayers who for reasons of conscience and religion choose to redirect a portion of their taxes paid to the government away from military uses and to the fund to be used, if so directed, for peace, education, research, humanitarian aid and other purposes.

This is the subject matter of a private member's bill. As a response to that bill, which is going to die on the Order Paper, I pledge myself to these petitioners that if I make it back the peace trust fund bill will be back as well.

Topic:   FAIR TRADE AND BENEFICIAL INVESTMENT ACT
Subtopic:   PETITIONS
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June 4, 1993

Mr. Ray Funk (Prince Albert-Churchill River):

Mr. Chairman, I do not have a great deal of questioning but there are two questions I would like to pose to the minister that deal with the bill as a whole. Therefore I think this is the appropriate time to deal with them.

My questions are with respect to the claims that have been made by the constituents I represent, the Denesu-line people in northern Saskatchewan and by extension in Manitoba.

The Dene people present the argument that they have an unextinguished treaty and aboriginal right in one corner of the Nunavut territory. The elders have put forward this argument very forcefully. Those of us who believe one should listen to the wisdom of the elders cannot help but be impressed by the sincerity in their belief of their treaty rights, that their signing of the treaty in 1899 did not extinguish in the way the federal government claims it did, their rights over their traditional territories.

I remind the House that in the Charlottetown agreement there was a recognition by all the governments in Canada, including the aboriginal people, that the wisdom of the elders was to hold equal sway with what was written in English with respect to the modern meaning of treaty.

I am not a lawyer and I have not read all of the documentation with respect to these kinds of questions. To me however, there has always been a fundamental illogic in the government's position.

Government Orders

The government has said to my constituents, the Dene that live south of the 60th parallel, that their treaty and aboriginal rights were extinguished by the signing of treaty eight. At the same time the government has given de facto recognition in the way it is proceeding with comprehensive claims negotiation to five bands north of the 60th parallel, the Snowdrift, Fort Resolution, Hay River and Dene bands. They have remaining treaty and aboriginal rights in the territories, at least to the extent that a comprehensive claims process is proceeding on their behalf with their involvement.

I cannot understand how it is possible that the same extinguishment clause in treaty eight, which was signed in 1899 before the current Northwest Territories boundary existed, could have extinguished the treaty and aboriginal rights of the treaty eight bands south of the 60th parallel while at the same time it did not by the de facto recognition of the government extinguish similar claims to those bands north of the 60th parallel.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   NUNAVUT ACT
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June 4, 1993

Mr. Ray Funk (Prince Albert -Churchill River):

Madam Speaker, I have the honour to table in the House petitions signed by 1,253 Canadians from Saskatchewan, Winnipeg, Vancouver, Vancouver Island, Toronto, Ottawa, Hamilton, Kitchener, Niagara, Elmira and many other communities in Canada.

The petitioners call on the Parliament of Canada to establish a peace trust fund which would allow Canadian taxpayers, who for reasons of conscience or religion, choose to direct a portion of their taxes paid to the government away from military uses and to a fund which would use the resources so directed for peace education, research, humanitarian aid and other peaceful purposes.

June 4, 1993

Routine Proceedings

As the author of a private member's bill calling for the establishment of such a fund, I would like to thank all of the people who have worked so hard across the country to make this effort a success.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   PETITIONS
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