Hance James LOGAN

LOGAN, The Hon. Hance James, K.C.

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
Cumberland (Nova Scotia)
Birth Date
April 26, 1869
Deceased Date
December 26, 1944
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hance_James_Logan
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=687c4488-2a54-4da2-b396-df8a4613b4fb&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
lawyer

Parliamentary Career

June 23, 1896 - October 9, 1900
LIB
  Cumberland (Nova Scotia)
November 7, 1900 - September 29, 1904
LIB
  Cumberland (Nova Scotia)
November 3, 1904 - September 17, 1908
LIB
  Cumberland (Nova Scotia)
December 6, 1921 - September 5, 1925
LIB
  Cumberland (Nova Scotia)
February 5, 1929 - September 5, 1925
LIB
  Cumberland (Nova Scotia)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 123 of 124)


April 29, 1901

Mr. LOGAN.

Supposing that a member of this House goes to the Canadian Pacific Railway and says : I demand that you

build a railway to a certain point in my constituency

Topic:   THE CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY.
Full View Permalink

April 29, 1901

Mr. LOGAN.

I have been here all afternoon, and I was in committee too.

Topic:   THE CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY.
Full View Permalink

April 29, 1901

Mr. LOGAN.

That question would arise if another company were asking for a charter and we refused it. But we should not force them to build a road regardless of whether it will pay or not.

Topic:   THE CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY.
Full View Permalink

April 3, 1901

Mr. H. J. LOGAN (Cumberland).

Mr. Speaker, I think this discussion will be of considerable benefit if it draws the attention of the country to two phases of the labour question. One is in reference to the Conciliation Bill which was passed by this House last session. I agree with the hon. member for Winnipeg (Mr. Puttee), that if the statement is correct, and I presume it is, when it is made by a minister in this House, if these men at Valleyfield were asked to work belt-deep in water for one dollar a day, it is sufficient justification, and the only reason I desire to know, that they should strike, and that the sympathy of the country should be with them. This is a growing time, particularly in the cotton trade of this country. The cotton manufacturers have no reason to complain of the treatment of the hon. Minister of Public Works (Mr. Tarte), even although he may have been almost justified in wreaking a little vengeance upon them. He used them in a magnanimous way, and it is not to their credit that he is able to make the statement in this House to-day, that after the way they have been used, touching the tariff, they are compelling men to work for the miserable sum of one dollar a day. What I arose particularly to refer to was the Conciliation Bill and the good effect of that Bill. Mr. King went to Valleyfield and the result was that the strike was settled, t have had some experience myself in reference to conciliation measures in my own constituency, and I know that in a place where they had nine or ten strikes in as many years, since the formation of the conciliation board there by their own accord three or four years ago, we have not had friction between capital and labour. I think this Bill will have a good effect if used properly in this country. I regret we cannot have compulsory arbitration, because it is outside of the jurisdiction of this House to pass such legislation. If it were within our jurisdiction, I think we would not be equal to our duty if we did not pass such legislation. But. we Mr. SUTHERLAND.

must make the best of what we have in this Conciliation Bill. The second point brought out was the calling out of the militia when this labour difficulty commenced. It seems to me that this should be the very last resort. Men who strike for better wages have to consider a number of serious matters before they quit work. They have to consider the question of the maintenance of their wives and children. It must be supposed that when they quit work and demand better wages there are very serious reasons why they should do so, and it should be the last resort that the militia should be called out, because it is nearly always certain to result in bloodshed, in riots, in the destruction of property and in loss of life. I desire to join my testimony to that of the hon. acting Postmaster General (Hon. Mr. Sutherland), in reference to Mr. King the Deputy Minister of Labour. Mr. King is one of the leading economical authorities of this country. He is a young man who was taken by the authorities of Harvard University, who know a good man when they find him, and was sent by them to study economical questions on the other side of the water. 'He had a position waiting him in Harvard University at a large salary as soon as he completed his studies on the other side of the water. He has spent some years on the continent of Europe and in England studying these questions, and he had this position open to him when he desired to return. The hon. Minister of Labour (Hon. Mr. Muloek) asked him to take charge of the Labour Bureau in this country. He left the position at Harvard to come back to serve his own country, and I am proud to say that we have this young Canadian, who is such a high authority on economical questions, as Deputy Minister of Labour in Canada. With regard to my hon. friend the member for Jacques Cartier (Mr. Monk), I feel confident, knowing Mr. King as I do, that he has been misinformed, and I know that the hon. gentleman will be the first, when he finds that he has been misinformed, to express his regret that he has made such statements.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   THE VALLE AFIELD LABOUR STRIKE.
Full View Permalink

March 28, 1901

Mr. LOGAN.

I rise to a point of order. The hon. gentleman is referring to a document, and the rule of the House is that all documents referred to should be laid on the Table.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   THE $4-BILL ISSUE.
Full View Permalink