Owen C. TRAINOR

TRAINOR, Owen C., M.C, C.M.

Personal Data

Party
Progressive Conservative
Constituency
Winnipeg South (Manitoba)
Birth Date
October 16, 1894
Deceased Date
November 28, 1956
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Owen_Trainor
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=687b21f6-290a-4780-ab34-629745fe08fe&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
physician

Parliamentary Career

August 10, 1953 - November 28, 1956
PC
  Winnipeg South (Manitoba)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 76 of 78)


January 28, 1954

Mr. Trainor:

Turning to the gentlemen farther left, they of course have their customary solution for everything. Why not print new money to build new houses?

Topic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Subtopic:   NATIONAL HOUSING ACT
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January 28, 1954

Mr. Trainor:

If we concede that the bill

will not meet the objectives for which it was designed, and the debate makes this self-evident, then I suggest it is incumbent on the house to seek alterations which give promise of achieving the objectives. In the first place, I think the validity of the fundamental concept of the bill should be examined. It assumes that individual home ownership is almost a sine qua non. I would dispute this basic assumption. How many families in urban localities have grown up and made their contribution to society in homes that they themselves did not own? It will be found that hundreds of thousands of the very best that this country has produced lived and lived well in rented premises.

I think that the emphasis in the bill should perhaps be shifted from home ownership to low rental housing. Mind you, I have no objection to the principle of home ownership. I would not favour altering the bill in any

rMr. Trainor.]

respect with regard to this principle. The bill provides for home ownership for certain groups of people. There is nothing wrong with individual ownership except that it is designed for those who wish it and, more particularly, for those who can afford it.

We shall have to concede that normal investment funds are not available for low rental housing largely because the return is too low and the conditions too uncertain to attract investment capital. Therefore I submit it is necessary to seek another agency. In this regard I should like to suggest to the minister that business and industry have the necessary social consciousness and sense of social responsibility to assume the burden of providing suitable housing for their own employees at a price they can afford to pay, provided, however, that this is not added to their operating expenses and consequently reflected in the price structure.

I submit, Mr. Speaker, that this is definitely in the interests of industry and business, because obviously the welfare of their employees must be of interest to them. The bill provides also, in a limited way, for this sort of participation by industry by specifying the industries of mining, lumbering, logging and so forth. Why not enlarge this provision to embrace all industry? There would be no particular objection that I can see to doing this. As a matter of fact, it would be a great social experiment.

I can envisage, Mr. Speaker, the emergence of a new social pattern wherein industry and business would gladly assume the responsibility for providing decent housing for its own employees. Such a development would unquestionably be in the best interests of business, and being based on self-interest it would be guaranteed a successful operation. I would suggest that these funds be lent to industry by the corporation when, in the judgment of the corporation, it is evident that the applicant possesses the financial stability to insure the servicing of the loan over a considerable period of time, and of course with adequate safeguards as to the rate of rental and so on.

I should say that this suggestion is entirely my own. I assume full responsibility for it, although I believe it is in accordance with the political principles of the official opposition. I offer it to the minister free and without expectation of any credit, because I believe I see in it the germ of a new social experiment which would provide decent homes for thousands of our people which this bill, in its present form, does not provide. (Translation):

Topic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Subtopic:   NATIONAL HOUSING ACT
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January 28, 1954

Mr. Trainor:

This is a beautifully simple

solution, of course, but it has the natural objection that maybe those who are supplying the houses, both labour and material suppliers, would not be willing to accept payment in this type of depreciated currency. Incidentally, this sort of thing has been tried before. It is not new. If the hon. gentlemen are interested in a souvenir collection, I think they can still pick up for about a nickel a million marks in the legal tender of Germany of the 1920's. That shows what happens when you start to do this sort of thing.

Topic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Subtopic:   NATIONAL HOUSING ACT
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January 28, 1954

Mr. O. C. Trainor (Winnipeg Souih):

Mr. Speaker, I had not intended to participate in this debate, largely because I did not think I had any particular qualifications which would enable me to make a useful contribution. However, this does not necessarily seem to be a deterrent. As the debate progressed, it became more and more evident that the bill was unlikely to achieve the professed purpose, namely, to provide houses for the low income groups of our population. It is interesting to review the suggestions of the various parties in the house on this question. The government group quite obviously regards this legislation as the summum bonum, the acme of perfection, the apple of its eye.

I am not quite certain as to what the mechanics of legislation in this parliament are, but I suspect that the minister and his administrative assistants were probably the architects of the bill. It is probable that they then referred it to the cabinet for approval, and when approval was obtained the bill was drafted. It is to me extraordinary that there could be such unanimity of opinion about this bill among members opposite unless, of course, they had the advantage of a preview and the bill actually represents a consensus. However, I am extremely doubtful that this is the case, and I would suggest that if it is not the case this is surely a travesty of the democratic process.

With respect to our friends on the left, as might be expected they have come forward with their usual facile solution that the taxpayer should provide. They neglect to tell us, however, that the taxpayer is not only corporations, which of course are fair game, but the payer of the sales and excise taxes- in short, everybody. As a matter of fact I am astonished at the moderation of these gentlemen. When they suggested that the government lend money at 2 per cent, which incidentally is approximately half the rate the government would have to pay for it, they might just as easily have suggested that the taxpayer should provide the money completely free of interest. While they are about it, why not also suggest that principal payments be forgotten?

National Housing Act

Topic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Subtopic:   NATIONAL HOUSING ACT
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December 16, 1953

1. What is the number, if any, of seamen previously employed in the Canadian merchant marine now serving under the flags of the United Kingdom, Panama and Liberia, respectively?

2. What is the number of seamen previously employed by the Canadian merchant marine now engaged in other occupations?

Topic:   CANADIAN MERCHANT SEAMEN
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