Donald Campbell JAMIESON

JAMIESON, The Hon. Donald Campbell, P.C., LL.D.

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
Burin--St. George's (Newfoundland and Labrador)
Birth Date
April 30, 1921
Deceased Date
November 19, 1986
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Don_Jamieson_(politician)
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=66de74f9-20dd-4ce5-9677-c4d17b6baa34&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
broadcaster, diplomat, radio & tv studio equipment operator

Parliamentary Career

September 19, 1966 - April 23, 1968
LIB
  Burin--Burgeo (Newfoundland and Labrador)
June 25, 1968 - September 1, 1972
LIB
  Burin--Burgeo (Newfoundland and Labrador)
  • Minister of Defence Production (July 6, 1968 - March 31, 1969)
  • Minister of Supply and Services (April 1, 1969 - May 4, 1969)
  • Minister of Transport (May 5, 1969 - November 26, 1972)
October 30, 1972 - May 9, 1974
LIB
  Burin--Burgeo (Newfoundland and Labrador)
  • Minister of Transport (May 5, 1969 - November 26, 1972)
  • Minister of Regional Economic Expansion (November 27, 1972 - September 25, 1975)
July 8, 1974 - March 26, 1979
LIB
  Burin--Burgeo (Newfoundland and Labrador)
  • Minister of Regional Economic Expansion (November 27, 1972 - September 25, 1975)
  • Minister of Industry, Trade and Commerce (September 26, 1975 - September 13, 1976)
  • Secretary of State for External Affairs (September 14, 1976 - June 3, 1979)
May 22, 1979 - December 14, 1979
LIB
  Burin--St. George's (Newfoundland and Labrador)
  • Secretary of State for External Affairs (September 14, 1976 - June 3, 1979)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 1 of 712)


March 26, 1979

Hon. Donald C. Jamieson (Secretary of State for External Affairs):

Mr. Speaker, I very much regret that I did not arrive in Ottawa until a few minutes before question period and do not have an up to date answer. My instinct would be to tell the hon. member that this has probably been done.

I am sure the hon. member is right in his statement about the requirement. However, this is not a nuclear object and there may be some distinction between the two. In any event, I will make inquiries and get the answer as soon as possible.

4482

Oral Questions NATIONAL DEFENCE

March 26, 1979

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
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March 21, 1979

Hon. Donald C. Jamieson (Secretary of State for External Affairs):

1. Mr. E. P. Black was appointed Deputy Under Secretary of State for External Affairs as announced on August 3, 1978.

Points of Order

2. The appointment of Mr. Black reflects the greater need for involving senior management in co-ordinating responsibilities of the department in the intelligence and national security fields having an international dimension; it is an indication of the importance the government attaches to the protection of Canadian interests in this respect. The government's support for international efforts to combat terrorism is a good example. Mr. Black's appointment does not involve any departure from existing policies.

3. Mr. Black has held a variety of posts in the foreign service where security matters were of relevance. His posts abroad included Moscow, London and Paris; he has been Director General of the Bureau of European Affairs at External Affairs in Ottawa, and, previous to his present appointment, spent two years as assistant deputy minister at the Department of National Defence.

4. Mr. Black's appointment was made by the Secretary of State for External Affairs on the advice of the Under-Secretary of State for External Affairs.

5. No.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   QUESTIONS ON THE ORDER PAPER
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March 16, 1979

Mr. Jamieson:

Mr. Speaker, I am sure the honourable member will appreciate, because he has been very co-operative on this issue, that I have chosen my words this morning quite carefully. We are not formally negotiating and saying that either we stay in Heathrow or such and such a thing will happen. I am most anxious, in the interests of good relations between Canada and the United Kingdom, to deal with the Heathrow issue on its own merits. Consequently, we have not in a sense imposed any threats or any hints of sanctions of that nature in a formal way.

I reiterate the point that if there is no response to this quite reasonable and, I think, fair representation made by our High Commissioner and now by the president of Air Canada, clearly we will have to look at alternatives. That should make it clear to the hon. member that an examination has been made of what are those alternatives. He can be assured that Canadian interests in this matter are being very, very carefully looked at.

I emphasize once again that I still have confidence the British government will recognize that Air Canada was one of the first airlines to use Heathrow, that there is a strong, centuries-long relationship between us and that consequently, as a senior member of the Commonwealth, we deserve better treatment than to be tossed out of Heathrow.

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
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March 16, 1979

Hon. Donald C. Jamieson (Secretary of State for External Affairs):

Mr. Speaker, I have said on previous occasions in the House and I have conveyed to the British authorities our wish to keep the issue of Heathrow versus Gatwick separate from any negotiations that might be going on or any other relationship we might have in air matters.

Oral Questions

However, I am quite prepared to agree with the conclusions drawn, I gather, by Mr. Taylor and by others who have spoken on this matter, including some members opposite, that if we find there is no willingness on the part of the British government to renegotiate this matter, then obviously it is going to have an effect on the over-all relationship in air matters between ourselves and the United Kingdom.

I want to make it perfectly clear that we are not at this moment threatening one against the other. In other workds, what Mr. Taylor was saying in his speech-and I have no ground for argument with what he said-was that there is a wide range of alternatives open to the government and to Air Canada in the event the British government refuses to co-operate. However, he did not link the two. Consequently, I do not propose to do so formally at this point. I think it is perfectly clear that if there is a failure on the part of the British government to accommodate Canadian interests in this matter, obviously it will have a spillover effect on other matters involving both countries.

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
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March 16, 1979

Mr. Jamieson:

Mr. Speaker, I would not want to acknowledge that efforts have failed. I told the House some time ago, in response to a question by the right hon. member for Prince Albert, that representations had been made at the highest level and that I had obtained an interim response from the foreign secretary, Mr. Owen, which did not slam the door, in effect. It indicated that further negotiations and discussions were going to take place. I hope I will have an opportunity to talk to Mr. Owen in New York when we proceed there for the Namibia talks over the weekend and that I can, indeed, keep this matter under negotiation. In that context, it certainly has not been a total rejection or even a partial rejection of the Canadian representations to this point in time.

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
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