William Stewart LOGGIE

LOGGIE, William Stewart

Personal Data

Party
Unionist
Constituency
Northumberland (New Brunswick)
Birth Date
August 10, 1850
Deceased Date
March 14, 1944
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/W._S._Loggie
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=65b95af4-7627-444a-9989-c8b3033301d0&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
company head, manufacturer, merchant

Parliamentary Career

November 3, 1904 - September 17, 1908
LIB
  Northumberland (New Brunswick)
October 26, 1908 - July 29, 1911
LIB
  Northumberland (New Brunswick)
September 21, 1911 - October 6, 1917
LIB
  Northumberland (New Brunswick)
December 17, 1917 - October 4, 1921
UNION
  Northumberland (New Brunswick)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 141 of 141)


April 10, 1908

Mr. LOGGIE.

Let us see. I think there is no better test or index of the progress of

the manufacturing industry of this country than the manufactures of cotton. Now I have taken the liberty to take from the blue-books a table to prove what I say with regard especially to our textile industries. I do not take wool, I take cotton, because cotton enters into a greater number of textiles than wool. The imports of raw cotton for the last five years of the Conservative government were as follows:

1892 $3,389,232

1893 3,201,452

1894 2,610,538

1895 2,853,987

1896 2,845,371

Total $14,900,580

or in round numbers there was an importation of $15,000,000 worth of raw cotton in five years.

Topic:   SUPPLY-THE BUDGET.
Subtopic:   JAS. BRADY.
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April 10, 1908

Mr. LOGGIE.

No, that is the total value.

Topic:   SUPPLY-THE BUDGET.
Subtopic:   JAS. BRADY.
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April 10, 1908

Mr. LOGGIE.

If I were to refer to my hon. friend (Mr. Stanfield) I think he would say that the knitting industry is in a fairly prosperous condition even in the maritime provinces. I have no desire to pry into his private business, but I am sure he would tell me that.

Topic:   SUPPLY-THE BUDGET.
Subtopic:   JAS. BRADY.
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April 10, 1908

Mr. LOGGIE.

No, I think we shall leave that until some other time.

Topic:   SUPPLY-THE BUDGET.
Subtopic:   JAS. BRADY.
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April 10, 1908

Mr. LOGGIE.

I am glad the hon. gentleman has been such a useful member and that those in charge of the department were wide enough awake to take advantage of the information as soon as it was brought to their notice. That is all any business man can do. The hon. gentleman tells us

that a considerable quantity of pork is imported, and he has the audacity to claim that our farmers are suffering because a class of pork is imported which Canadians do not raise.

As a matter of fact, I know from personal experience, a large proportion of the pork that is imported into Canada from the United States is a class that is not produced in this country to any great extent. It is known in the trade as ' fat back ' or clear fat pork. As a matter of fact, the farmers and packers of Canada do not produce in any large quantity this class of pork and cannot supply the demand for it. Now, if this statement of mine regarding this class of pork is true, and if this pork is used largely in fishing camps and lumber camps, is it fair or reasonable that you should heavily tax the people who consume it with the expectation that some one is benefited by it who produces a lighter class of pork in Canada? We have an example of the same kind of policy in the United States. In portions of Maine there are blueberry barrens, and the people there are so given up to the idea of protection that, for the sake of these few blueberry barrens in the state of Maine, they put a duty of 70 per cent on the canned article. But does that stop the canned article, packed in Canada, from finding its way into the United States? It does not, it simply enhances the price to the consumer. If any hon. gentleman wants this verified, let him go to Messrs. H. N. Bate & Sons in this city, and ask the price of canned blueberries for the wholesale trade. He will find that they are sold at 75 cents a dozen. Then let him write to Messrs. Francis II. Leggatt & Company, of New York, and he will find that they sell the same goods at $1.15 or $1.20 a dozen. So, to protect these blueberry barrens in the state of Maine, the whole consuming public of the United States is paying this extra duty. Is it wise to increase the duty on barrelled pork as suggested by my hon. friend (Mr. Clements) especially the class of pork referred to by me as being used by our fishermen and lumbermen.

Topic:   SUPPLY-THE BUDGET.
Subtopic:   JAS. BRADY.
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