Oliver Robert GOULD

GOULD, Oliver Robert

Personal Data

Party
Progressive
Constituency
Assiniboia (Saskatchewan)
Birth Date
April 4, 1874
Deceased Date
October 7, 1951
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oliver_Robert_Gould
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=64ea5c35-fa23-4e75-a3d7-1d07114270e0&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
carpenter, farmer

Parliamentary Career

October 27, 1919 - October 4, 1921
UF
  Assiniboia (Saskatchewan)
December 6, 1921 - September 5, 1925
PRO
  Assiniboia (Saskatchewan)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 1 of 163)


June 23, 1925

Mr. GOULD:

Will the hon. member for

Brome visualize this feature: The elevator company at the initial point have built their elevator with the object of handling and transferring a commodity which is offered them, and a tariff is laid down in the act to pay them completely for those services. They are absolutely and entirely paid for the services they perform by the tariff the farmer agrees to pay. What right have they in the commodity? What ownership have they in the property, if they have been paid all the charges for the services they have performed?

Topic:   CANADA GRAIN ACT AMENDMENT
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June 23, 1925

Mr. GOULD:

Mr. Chairman, the owner of the merchandise has the right to designate to what port it shall go.

Topic:   CANADA GRAIN ACT AMENDMENT
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June 23, 1925

Mr. GOULD:

I have an amendment to

submit, as follows:

That subsection 2 of section 150 be amended by striking out all the words in the second paragraph thereof after the word "weights" in line ten up to and including the word "provides" in the twelfth line, and substituting therefor the following words:

"Only when such grain is shipped to a point at which there is no official grading and no official weighing."

The clause as drafted presumes that all grain leaving a country elevator will go to a terminal point or some place where there are official scales and weighing facilities, but such is not the case. A large trade is carried on in the transfer of grain from one point to another, as in the case of feed, seed and various other things of that nature. The clause as drafted makes no provision for that, and I think the amendment would cover it.

Topic:   CANADA GRAIN ACT AMENDMENT
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June 23, 1925

Mr. GOULD:

No.

Topic:   CANADA GRAIN ACT AMENDMENT
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June 23, 1925

Mr. GOULD:

My remarks will be very

brief, because we want to get along with the business. I thought perhaps by presenting this matter from a slightly different angle from the way it has been presented it might make it a little more clear. I wanted to point out to the committee that the reason why we asked for this amendment, or the justification for asking to retain the right to send our grain to whatever terminal we wish, can be based upon this assumption; the elevator companies are licensed under the act and for a certain tariff they agree to handle grain. On special bin grain up to the present time they have charged If cents a bushel for handling, but the act provides they may charge 2J cents. Up to the present time the majority of the elevator companies have not accepted that opportunity afforded them in the act, and have not charged the high rate, simply because they wished to send it down to their own elevators at the head of the lakes, manipulate the grain and thereby exact an undue toll. Now the individual who owns the grain, say a thousand bushels, value one thousand dollars, has $1,000 investment in it. The elevator operator at the initial point has If cents per bushel or 2| cents-$17.50 or $25.

Topic:   CANADA GRAIN ACT AMENDMENT
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