Arthur Samuel GOODEVE

GOODEVE, Arthur Samuel

Personal Data

Party
Conservative (1867-1942)
Constituency
Kootenay (British Columbia)
Birth Date
December 15, 1860
Deceased Date
November 23, 1920
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arthur_Samuel_Goodeve
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=64a8b3b9-6cc4-4b67-b0b6-1e57b883617c&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
pharmacist

Parliamentary Career

October 26, 1908 - July 29, 1911
CON
  Kootenay (British Columbia)
September 21, 1911 - October 6, 1917
CON
  Kootenay (British Columbia)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 1 of 50)


March 18, 1912

The CHAIRMAN (Mr. Goodeve).

I will read the clauses if the hon. member (Mr. Oliver) desires.

Topic:   SUPPLY.
Subtopic:   CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY COMPANY.
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March 18, 1912

The CHAIRMAN. (Mr. Goodeve).

No.

Topic:   SUPPLY.
Subtopic:   PRIVATE BILLS.
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February 23, 1912

Mr. GOODEVE.

I endorse the suggestion of the hon. member for Dundas (Mr. Bro-der) that this expenditure should be on trunk line roads, and I do so all the more readily, because of our experience in British Columbia. A few years ago, Mr. Taylor, Minister of Public Works for British Columbia, conceived the idea of setting aside a certain sum of money each session for the building of a trunk road from Bur-rard Inlet to the provincial boundary of Alberta. That proposal when first made was received not only by a large number of the members of the House, but by a large number of the people of the province, with very grave doubt, fearing, as they did, that a special trunk road of that nature was scarcely warranted by the then development stage of our province. However, only two or three sessions passed before Mr. Taylor was able to demonstrate the great benefit such a trunk line bestowed on the province. Mr. Taylor is now affectionately called by the people ' Good Roads Taylor,' and there is no more popular grant made in the legislature than the annual appropriation for the continuation of that provincial trunk road. To give an idea how such a trunk road advertises the province, I may mention that last winter I delivered a lecture in Toronto and having referred to this British Columbia provincial road, a number of gentlemen waited on me after the meeting; they were men of leisure and means, and they decided to so arrange their summer tour that they might motor over that scenic route in British Columbia. I feel strongly that if this grant of Dominion money is merely distributed throughout the provinces here and there, for municipal roads, you will not get the same concrete benefit you would if the expenditure were made on a distinctive trunk line road; a road that eventually would stretch from Halifax on the Atlantic to Burrard Inlet, on the Pacific. Were such a road constructed, the municipal roads would become feeders to it, with the result that they would be greatly improved and the whole Dominion would reap untold benefits. I was present at the Yukon Exposition in Seattle, and I attended .there an illustrated lecture on good roads. One of the pictures thrown on the screen showed a team of horses with a wagon containing

two or three bales of cotton, the wagon stuck in the mud, the fences broken, and everything dilapidated and dismal looking. Then, another picture showed the same place five years after the construction of a trunk road, and on this road was a wagon loaded with a ton and a half of baled cotton, drawn by a splendid team of horses, and with fine residences on each side of the rgad. The lecturer assured us that all this change had been brought about inside of five years by the good roads improvement commission of that district, and the illustration impressed itself very vividly on my mind. It is my opinion that the municipalities should continue to look after their own roads and that the Dominion grant should be devoted to a trunk line system of roads, such as I have referred to. The trunk road would be in the nature of a model road; it would be laid out with the idea of reaching from one snecific point to another, exactly like a transcontinental line of railway, and the municipal roads would become feeders to it. I believe that is the correct principle upon which the Dominion grant should be expended. A splendid trunk road extending through the entire Dominion would be an incentive to the municipalities to put their roads in first class order; it would induce travel by tourists who would be free spenders; it would encourage the erection of first class tourist hotels at various places, and on the whole it would in every way benefit every part of the Dominion. I most heartily endorse that portion of the remarks of the hon. member for Dundas (Mr. Broder) in which he advocated this trunk line road.

Topic:   IMPROVEMENT OF HIGHWAYS.
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February 13, 1912

Mr. GOODEVE.

Is the hon, gentleman contending that the farmer would have got the additional price represented by the amount paid in duty for his barley?

Topic:   APPOINTMENT OF A TARIFF COMMISSION.
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February 13, 1912

Mr. GOODEVE.

Then, the producer, not the iconsumer, pays the duty?

Topic:   APPOINTMENT OF A TARIFF COMMISSION.
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