Pius MICHAUD

MICHAUD, Pius, Q.C.

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
Restigouche--Madawaska (New Brunswick)
Birth Date
August 28, 1870
Deceased Date
July 5, 1956
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pius_Michaud
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=64706d8b-7252-4010-9517-6f90f6dfaf49&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
barrister, lawyer

Parliamentary Career

March 5, 1907 - September 17, 1908
LIB
  Victoria (New Brunswick)
October 26, 1908 - July 29, 1911
LIB
  Victoria (New Brunswick)
September 21, 1911 - October 6, 1917
LIB
  Victoria (New Brunswick)
December 17, 1917 - October 4, 1921
L LIB
  Restigouche--Madawaska (New Brunswick)
December 6, 1921 - September 5, 1925
LIB
  Restigouche--Madawaska (New Brunswick)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 1 of 92)


June 20, 1925

Mr. MICHAUD:

It is only one member

on the other side of the House who requires all the information.

Topic:   DOMINION ELECTIONS ACT AMENDMENT
Full View Permalink

June 20, 1925

Mr. MICHAUD:

I should like to draw

this matter to the attention of the minister and the Chief Electoral Officer. Proclamations are printed in the official languages of the country, which are French and English. The French proclamations are posted up in Quebec on account of the people there speaking and reading French. In the Maritime provinces we have many constituencies where the

electors are practically all French-speaking therefore, I would ask that when these proclamations are sent to French districts in the Maritime provinces, the French proclamation should be posted up with the English one, so that our people will understand what the proclamation means. During the last campaign I was compelled on several occasions to explain to our French-speaking electors what these proclamations printed in English meant.

Topic:   DOMINION ELECTIONS ACT AMENDMENT
Full View Permalink

June 15, 1925

Mr. MICHAUD:

If the proposition of

the hon. member for West Lambton (Mr. Le-Sueur) passes in this House, no power will be allowed to be exported according to the laws of the Dominion of Canada. If I understand his proposition rightly, he is going to stop any further exportation of hydroelectric power from this Dominion into the United States or anywhere else. My contention is that we should not allow the Dominion to control our provincial rights in that regard. The little province of New Brunswick is entering upon a large expenditure in order to develop a water-power which is one of the biggest in the Maritime provinces, and it would be unfortunate for us, after having incurred so much expense, if we were to be deprived of our rights. Already we have spent a great deal of money, already we are about to issue bonds, and if this resolution carries New Brunswick will be prevented from going on with this development and from issuing its bonds, because none of our financial companies will dare to advance us any money when the Dominion government is to control our rights and privileges. I hope I have made myself clear. If this proposition goes through, it means that my province will no longer be able to develop this great water-power. It means that all our ambitions, our undertakings, will come to nothing, and I shall be one of those who will be very sorry to know to-night, after this vote, that our provincial rights have been taken away from us at the request of my hon, friends to your left.

Mr. HERBERT 'MARLER (St. Lawrenice-St. George): Mr. Speaker, what I have to say apropos olf this resolution imay be said in a very few worlds. I regret I was not present to hear all the remarks which the hon. member for West Lamlbton (Mr. LeSueur) made on this subject. I am sure in this case he, in his usual! fashion, placed this proposal before the House in an extremely clear and fair manner. I have, however, heal'd the greater part of the other discussion which has 'taken place relative to this matter. No one can deny for a

Export oj Power

moment that our water-powers are one of the great natural resources of Canada. It does not need any very vivid stretch of the imagination to realize that some day we shall likely require for use in Canada substantially all the water-powers which we have developed and undeveloped at the present time. But being one of the great natural resources of this Dominion, those water-ipowers which are undeveloped now should be utilized either in the development of Canada or for such purposes otherwise in the sole interest of Canada itself. In other words, although I believe the water-powers undeveloped at the present time will eventually be needed for use in Canada alone, and for that reason it seems it would be an extremely unwise thing to export any (of that power whatsoever, yet at the same time it does not seem to me entirely wise or in the greatest interest of Canada immediately to shuit the door and say that we shall never at any time export any of those water^powers, because the occasion (might arise-and we do not know when it might arise; we cannot even say whether it ever will arise-when it might become vitally necessary, in the interest of this country for bargaining purposes or for other reasons, to utilize certain of these water-powers in procuring some other greater advantage for Canada. It seems to me therefore unwise for us in this House to-day to shut the door definitely and absolutely for all time and say that we shall never export water power.

My hon. friend from West York this evening has emphasized the various necessities for the water-powers of the Dominion. He has read extracts from various reports and has placed the situation before the House in a very lucid and fair manner. But I do not think that there are many of us who needed to be told all that that hon. gentleman has told us. We realize all these facts to the full. We realize on this side of the House just as much and indeed more than hon. gentlemen realize opposite the great importance of doing every thing possible to develop this Country to its very fullest extent; and I do not think that hon. gentlemen opposite can point to us and say that we do not desire to preserve for use in the development of the Dominion our water powers or any other natural resources which are in the country. The preservation and use of our natural resources has at all times to this government been a matter of the greatest concern, and I have no reason to believe that this policy will 'be' departed from in any respect so far as our water-powers are concerned. It is true that there are a number of undeveloped water powers in this country

and in this vicinity. In the Ottawa valley there is undeveloped water-power to the extent of at least 350,000 horse-power; while on the Rouge river there is power to the extent of over 20,000 horse-power, on the Nation over 20,000 horse-power, on the Lievre over 80,000, and on the Gatineau over 150,000 horse-power, all undeveloped. The casual observer might ask, what is the use in allowing all this water-power to go to waste? I do not follow that theory at all. I have no hesitation in declaring that I am not in favour of the export of water-power except in the case of some actual necessity which is shown to be of distinct benefit and advantage to this country, nor am I in favour on the other hand of absolutely closing the door forever against such export, and taking the stand that we should never under any circumstances permit the export of water-power.

Topic:   SUPPLY-EXPORT OF POWER
Full View Permalink

June 15, 1925

Mr. PIUS MICHAUD (Restigouche and Madawaska):

I have listened attentively to

the discussion of this important subject for many hours, and I must say, Mr. Speaker, that I cannot understand the attitude of my hon. friends to your left. I do not know what shivers have taken hold of them in the past two years. They seem to be embarrassed on account of the extra powers we may develop in this country in connection with our hydroelectric. In all the provinces of the Dominion we have power to develop, and no doubt in many provinces there will be a surplus of power that should be sold somewhere outside of our own country. For instance, we are developing our natural resources in many provinces as well as we possibly can. I ask my hon. friends from the prairie provinces;

if they had no market for their produce outside of Canada, what would they do with the extra quantity of wheat that they produce? The same thing applies to the electric power development of this country. The Minister of Railways (Mr. Graham) has spoken very openly and1 clearly on the subject, and I have listened to him with great attention. He has alluded to the province of New Brunswick as did the hon. member for Yorlc-Sunbury (Mr. Hanson), and I wish to speak in reference to the latter province. In that province we have one of the largest water-powers of the Maritime provinces. Its development is required in order that our province should go ahead. Recently application for the development of the Grand falls was made to the province of New Brunswick, and a meeting was held in Montreal last Friday and Saturday in connection with this matter. I hold in my hand the Gazette, published in Montreal, in which appears a report of the decision at the meeting of the International Joint Commission. The report reads as follows:

The chairman, C. A. Magrath, entrusted to Sir WiJliam Hearst the task of issuing a statement.

Here is the statement:

The commission has granted an order of approval of tho plans submitted by the Hydro-Electric Power Commission of New Brunswick for the development of power at Grand Falls, N.B., subject to a number of terms and conditions with reference to the compensation of all parties-

I might say en passant, that this is in connection with the shore rights along the St. John river. The report proceeds:

-sustaining damages, or whose property has been in any way taken or injured in connection with the development.

The United States claimed at first that they had a sovereign ri^ht in connection with this development on account of their international situation. After a long debate and after the argument made by the attorney representing Canada at that last meeting the United States gave up the idea of their sovereign rights, and in order to show that they had no rights at all the Canadian attorney established and proved to the representative of the United States that as soon as the shore rights on the American side were purchased by the New Brunswick Hydro Electric Commission the United States would no longer have any right in connection with this development.

In order to show the House that the Americans have no longer any rights, I may say that they have asked, not as a compensation, not under their sovereign right, but just as a compromise, that the New Brunswick Electric Company should sell them 2,000 horse-power

Export oj Power

and they would pay for it just the same amount as would be paid by a Canadian consumer. The 2,000 horse-power does not represent the rights of the Americans as far as the international boundary is concerned. The international boundary on each side of the river covers a distance of seventy miles. The Americans are claiming only 2,000 horsepower, whereas we are going to develop between 50,000 and 75,000 horse-power. They do not claim even one-fifth of their rights according to the agreement which I have just read. This water-power is developed on Canadian soil entirely, and according to the engineers the dam that will be built will allow the water to flow back for a distance of only fourteen miles, that is fourteen miles out of a distance of seventy miles as far as the international boundary is concerned. Our American friends are willing and ready to give us what we are entitled to. In order to make this development a success, while a certain quantity of this power will be needed to fill our requirements at home, we feel that we are going to develop more than we need at home, and for that reason we want to have the power, not under the Dominion government, but under our provincial rights, to sell outside the extra power that we shall have on hand.

Therefore, I would suggest that it would be very apropos for the House to arrive at this conclusion, that the export of hydro-electric power from Canada should be permitted only on yearly license, and that hereafter no license for export of power beyond that already granted should be issued except with the concurrence of the province or provinces in which it is proposed to develop such power. That means that no power should be exported out of any province by the Dominion without the consent of the province where the power is developed. Let me appeal to my hon. friends from the west. They are just about to develop their provincial water-powers, and I remember not very long ago in the Railway committee seeing on two occasions moving pictures showing the great water-powers about to be developed in Manitoba, Alberta and British Columbia. I ask my hon. friends from the west: When

you start to develop your power and you have a surplus after providing for all your industries, farmers, merchants and the rest of your inhabitants, what are you going to do with your surplus? Are you going to be allowed to keep that at home without deriving any revenue from it? Are you going to let the government say: No, we will not allow you

to export any of that power? You want to 273 [DOT]

control that privilege. As long as a province has the right to export its own power, there is no danger of its going too far in that direction.

Topic:   SUPPLY-EXPORT OF POWER
Full View Permalink

June 15, 1925

Mr. MICHAUD:

They have the right

actually to develop their own power.

Topic:   SUPPLY-EXPORT OF POWER
Full View Permalink