Richard JANELLE

JANELLE, Richard

Personal Data

Party
Progressive Conservative
Constituency
Lotbinière (Quebec)
Birth Date
November 13, 1947
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Janelle
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=63f3f982-68c0-4d58-91a8-75fa11691181&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
coordinator, secretary

Parliamentary Career

October 16, 1978 - March 26, 1979
SC
  Lotbinière (Quebec)
May 22, 1979 - December 14, 1979
SC
  Lotbinière (Quebec)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Regional Economic Expansion (October 1, 1979 - December 14, 1979)
September 23, 1979 - December 14, 1979
PC
  Lotbinière (Quebec)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Regional Economic Expansion (October 1, 1979 - December 14, 1979)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 1 of 8)


December 6, 1979

Mr. Richard Janelle (Parliamentary Secretary to Minister of Regional Economic Expansion):

Mr. Speaker, I am very pleased to take part in this important debate on an opposition motion. Tonight I should like to dwell on one aspect of the motion: the creation of temporary jobs. The creation of temporary jobs that the government continues to finance in the eastern part of the country, under the Canada Works program, is an effort with a tremendous impact. We could certainly talk about individual achievements that allowed communities to get many recreational facilities, services and all kinds of buildings Canadians will keep enjoying. Over this past year the Canada Works program provided jobs to about 33,935 unemployed, mostly in Quebec and in the maritime provinces. It makes it possible for an impressive number of workers, out of work for some reason, to stay on the labour market, to keep their knowledge or expertise, or to acquire new ones.

In view of the present rate of unemployment, which is especially high in Quebec and in the maritimes, job-creation

Employment Strategy

programs such as the Canada Works program serve a particular purpose, that of giving workers who are temporarily out of work or in between jobs the opportunity of using their expertise for the benefit of the community on projects subsidized by the federal government. It is important to note, however, that this job-creation program, whose role remains very important in Quebec and in the Atlantic provinces, cannot be considered an effective tool against structural unemployment. A program such as the Canada Works program can only lower cyclical or ' seasonal unemployment. This program is for workers who are temporarily out of work or for those who want to get some experience in a particular field over a few months, which can help them land a permanent job afterwards.

A program such as the Canada Works program also helps community groups undertake certain projects which, without government assistance, would never get started. In a number of communities throughout Quebec, for instance, Canada Works projects have helped improve the welfare of some members of the community or the community as a whole. For instance, in my riding of Lotbiniere, this year, the Canada Works program provided work to about 80 persons who will now be able to help their community. Of course, last year the subsidy was much higher in my riding but at that time the rate of unemployment was also much higher than it is now.

Permanent jobs were created which gave people a chance to find employment; this will eventually be much more profitable than the temporary jobs created by Canada Works programs. That is the type of program the government is putting forward. In addition, the diversity of those projects calls for a wide array of skills. Sometimes those temporary jobs may also lead to permanent employment.

As we all surely know, the Canada Works program subsidizes projects in areas where the unemployment rate is particularly high, where the need for help is the greatest. That is why there are no projects this year in some cities such as Calgary or Edmonton, while there are in Rimouski, Gaspe and Bathurst. Mr. Speaker, it is this ability to relieve unemployment in those areas which have special need for assistance that makes the Canada Works program worth while.

The projects we subsidize in Rimouski, in the province of Quebec, meet the specific needs of that city in terms of employment. We do not subsidize projects that use workers in areas where there are job opportunities. So, by granting Rimouski, for instance, $73,000 for a cultural centre, we are sure that the project will hire local workers who will be employed until such time as a permanent job becomes available. We keep encouraging workers to look for a permanent job while working on a Canada Works project.

Faced with a particularly high rate of unemployment among the young workers of Canada, and especially those of Quebec and the maritime provinces, the Canada Works program very often reaches a double objective, preventing their going through a long period of unemployment and sometimes provid-

December 6, 1979

Employment Strategy

ing them with their first important jobs. So for the young people who are looking for their first jobs, the waiting period before finding permanent jobs is tempered, and they keep their hopes and motivations.

Mr. Speaker, I prefer by far seeing our young graduates from the various community colleges work on the construction of a system of cross country ski trails while waiting for permanent jobs than wasting their time standing on street corners.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   BUSINESS OF SUPPLY
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December 6, 1979

Mr. Janelle:

Mr. Speaker, I think it is very difficult to continue. 1 think we all know a project funded by Canada Works whose immediate result was the development of a sports centre, or a library which continues to provide permanent employment to several people, let alone the people who continue to benefit from community services set up or developed under the Canada Works program.

Having said that, Mr. Speaker, it is clear that the Canada Works program, in spite of its merits and its successes, could not last forever in a role that only serves to correct the problem of unemployment on a partial or temporary basis. Indeed, Mr. Speaker, the government in power showed yesterday that it has already started to solve the problems of unemployment when the Minister of Regional Economic Expansion (Mr. MacKay) announced in Montreal the DREE grant program in a special area of Montreal. The program brings several major amendments to the former special area of Montreal and satellite cities, those cities that among other things will be able in all industrial sectors without exception to be eligible for the DREE program, and that will really create new jobs. Indeed, it is important to know that the area of application will be extended to include from now on the ridings of Vaudreuil, Soulanges and Huntington, as well as the non-designated part of the Outaouais area. My friends opposite were asking me earlier if that would create employment if DREE is to be called upon to fund over 500 projects in the four years planned for this new program. Those projects should generate investments of nearly $500 million and allow for the creation of over 32,000 direct and indirect jobs. That is constructive.

This government also looked for practical, new and appropriate solutions suited to the needs and circumstances. It is precisely the reason why a new policy of job creation was established by this government in the last few months and why its content will be revealed in the budget speech, in a few days.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   BUSINESS OF SUPPLY
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December 6, 1979

Mr. Janelle:

Mr. Speaker, 1 wonder whether the hon. member is speaking on the motion introduced by his party today or whether he is indulging in petty politics.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   BUSINESS OF SUPPLY
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December 6, 1979

Mr. Janelle:

My minister is listening. Some of the activities within a Canada Works project may even lead to the development of tourist attractions which may eventually be a source of still more jobs. I think we all know-

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   BUSINESS OF SUPPLY
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December 6, 1979

Mr. Janelle:

If my hon. friend does not know this, perhaps he should read newspapers now and then. I think during his time with the government in power the hon. member for Verdun (Mr. Savard) should perhaps have endeavoured to do something for the Montreal area and, for the special areas in the Outaouais region, instead of criticizing the present government which has to make up for the errors made by them for 16 years.

Such policies on the part of this government will better meet the needs of all areas of the country because it must be emphasized that they were developed after full consultation with provincial authorities. They will be part of a comprehensive strategy to promote and stimulate the job-creation efforts of both private enterprise and other government levels. Mr. Speaker, 1 believe that these facts will have provided a few answers to hon. members opposite concerning this part of the motion now under consideration.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   BUSINESS OF SUPPLY
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