William Warren ALLMAND

ALLMAND, The Hon. William Warren, P.C., O.C., Q.C., B.C.L., LL.D

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
Notre-Dame-de-Grâce (Quebec)
Birth Date
September 19, 1932
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Warren_Allmand
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=62c8fd64-eb59-4bf9-b138-bd43854deedf&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
barrister and solicitor, lawyer

Parliamentary Career

November 8, 1965 - April 23, 1968
LIB
  Notre-Dame-de-Grâce (Quebec)
June 25, 1968 - September 1, 1972
LIB
  Notre-Dame-de-Grâce (Quebec)
October 30, 1972 - May 9, 1974
LIB
  Notre-Dame-de-Grâce (Quebec)
  • Solicitor General of Canada (November 27, 1972 - September 13, 1976)
July 8, 1974 - March 26, 1979
LIB
  Notre-Dame-de-Grâce (Quebec)
  • Solicitor General of Canada (November 27, 1972 - September 13, 1976)
  • Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development (September 14, 1976 - September 15, 1977)
  • Minister of Consumer and Corporate Affairs (September 16, 1977 - June 3, 1979)
May 22, 1979 - December 14, 1979
LIB
  Notre-Dame-de-Grâce (Quebec)
  • Minister of Consumer and Corporate Affairs (September 16, 1977 - June 3, 1979)
February 18, 1980 - July 9, 1984
LIB
  Notre-Dame-de-Grâce (Quebec)
September 4, 1984 - October 1, 1988
LIB
  Notre-Dame-de-Grâce--Lachine East (Quebec)
November 21, 1988 - September 8, 1993
LIB
  Notre-Dame-de-Grâce (Quebec)
October 25, 1993 - February 24, 1997
LIB
  Notre-Dame-de-Grâce (Quebec)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 4 of 831)


October 21, 1996

Mr. Allmand

Mr. Speaker, I missed the first vote but I want to be counted as voting with the government on this vote.

Topic:   Government Orders
Subtopic:   Bankruptcy And Insolvency Act
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October 10, 1996

Hon. Warren Allmand (Notre-Dame-de-Grâce, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, on September 26 I rose in Parliament to note the historic signing that week of the comprehensive nuclear test ban treaty at the United Nations by 80 countries, including Canada. I should point out that as of today, 111 countries have signed the comprehensive test ban treaty. This treaty will reduce the development of new nuclear weapons because if nuclear weapons cannot be tested, new nuclear weapons cannot be developed.

On September 26, I also noted that several key countries, sometimes known as nuclear threshold states, had refused to sign the treaty. These are countries that have a nuclear weapons program and are trying to develop a nuclear weapons capability. Prominent among these countries which did not sign are India and Pakistan. I should point out that Pakistan was willing to sign if India signed, but India refused to sign.

I would like to point out as well that to bring this treaty into force, it is required that 44 nations which have a nuclear capability must ratify the treaty and deposit the ratifications at the UN.

The signing of this historic treaty, especially by the five nuclear powers, is indeed a great accomplishment for the security of our planet and a great accomplishment for the security of mankind. I might say as well it is a great accomplishment for those of us who have been working for many years to ban all nuclear weapons.

This treaty properly complements the nuclear non-proliferation treaty which was extended indefinitely several months ago.

However the signing of this treaty is not enough. The job is incomplete. Not only is it essential to get the 44 ratifications to bring the treaty into force, but it is also essential to bring on side those nations such as India that have not yet signed. There will be no advance in global security if the old nuclear powers stop testing and reduce their weapons, while other nations continue to test and become new nuclear powers.

India's argument that the present nuclear powers should first commit to a timetable to reduce and eliminate all their nuclear weapons is a good argument, but it does not justify its non-signature nor any future testing or any attempt to develop new nuclear capabilities.

Such countries as Germany, Japan and Brazil, which are also large powerful countries and do not have nuclear weapons, are not blocking the treaty and insisting that these other countries do what India is insisting.

Once again I ask the government, what can Canada do to bring India and other non-signatories on side and to assure the implementation of this important treaty?

Topic:   Adjournment Proceedings
Subtopic:   Hazardous Materials
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October 3, 1996

Hon. Warren Allmand (Notre-Dame-de-Grâce, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, the President of the Treasury Board has just tabled his annual report on the status of the official languages in federal institutions.

I am happy to see that progress has been made at all levels. The number of bilingual employees in the federal public service more than meets the requirements and shows that one out of five public servants has a superior knowledge of his or her second language.

The capacity to serve the public in both official languages has significantly improved. Further to the recommendations made by the Commissioner of Official Languages on language of work in

the national capital, federal institutions took measures which should result in a major improvement.

Program review has not had a negative impact on the level of bilingual services provided to the public, nor on participation rates of anglophones and francophones.

I am happy to note that we are making progress in advancing official languages in federal institutions.

Topic:   Statements By Members
Subtopic:   Official Languages
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September 26, 1996

Hon. Warren Allmand (Notre-Dame-de-Grâce, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Acting Minister of Foreign Affairs.

This week in a historic event, Canada and 79 other nations signed the comprehensive nuclear test ban treaty at the United Nations.

Unfortunately, some of the nuclear threshold states, including India, have stated that they would not sign. Could the minister say what steps Canada is taking to bring India and these other countries on side and to ensure that this important treaty comes into force as soon as possible?

Topic:   Oral Question Period
Subtopic:   Nuclear Test Ban Treaty
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September 19, 1996

Hon. Warren Allmand (Notre-Dame-de-Grâce, Lib.)

Madam Speaker, I have three petitions from several hundred Canadians from different provinces which state that abolishing the opportunity for prisoners serving life sentences of 15 years or more who apply for a judicial review of their parole eligibility will likely only serve to increase both the human and economic costs of the criminal justice system and increase public fear and misconceptions about crime among the Canadian public.

The petitioners therefore call on Parliament to oppose the repeal of section 745 of the Criminal Code or the restriction of prisoners access to just and fair procedures as well as to launch a concerted public education campaign to promote the need for more responsible and humane criminal justice approaches to enhance the safety of all Canadians.

Topic:   Routine Proceedings
Subtopic:   Petitions
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