Leslie Gordon BENJAMIN

BENJAMIN, Leslie Gordon

Personal Data

Party
New Democratic Party
Constituency
Regina--Lumsden (Saskatchewan)
Birth Date
April 29, 1925
Deceased Date
June 16, 2003
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Les_Benjamin
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=5fe02b34-43c8-48d3-a5a8-013554a3ef13&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
manager, railway station agent, secretary, telegrapher

Parliamentary Career

June 25, 1968 - September 1, 1972
NDP
  Regina--Lake Centre (Saskatchewan)
October 30, 1972 - May 9, 1974
NDP
  Regina--Lake Centre (Saskatchewan)
July 8, 1974 - March 26, 1979
NDP
  Regina--Lake Centre (Saskatchewan)
May 22, 1979 - December 14, 1979
NDP
  Regina West (Saskatchewan)
February 18, 1980 - July 9, 1984
NDP
  Regina West (Saskatchewan)
  • N.D.P. Caucus Chair (April 20, 1983 - May 17, 1983)
September 4, 1984 - October 1, 1988
NDP
  Regina West (Saskatchewan)
November 21, 1988 - September 8, 1993
NDP
  Regina--Lumsden (Saskatchewan)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 1 of 1126)


June 16, 1993

Mr. Benjamin:

Don't pay any attention to them, Nelson.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   PETITIONS
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June 16, 1993

Mr. Les Benjamin (Regina-Lumsden):

Mr. Speaker, it is my duty and honour to present a petition signed by many residents of the city of Regina in my constituency. They say that we are increasingly becoming a culture of violence and violence has become an ordinary part of our children's lives.

Part of this culture is a serial killer board game which comes with a bag of 25 babies, the point of which is to murder as many defenceless children as possible. The laws of Canada do not deal with materials portraying torture, rape and murder as fun, including serial killer board games.

Your petitioners request that Parliament consider amending the Criminal Code of Canada so that violent degrading material such as the serial killer board game can be kept from being distributed in Canada.

Topic:   NATIONAL NEIGHBOURHOOD ACT
Subtopic:   PETITIONS
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June 16, 1993

Mr. Les Benjamin (Regina-Lumsden):

Mr. Speaker, it is a pleasure to join my colleagues from Algoma and Vegreville and others in reminiscing. I have been thinking not only about those still here from the class of '68 but also those that no longer are here.

What made me think about it is that in the spring of 1969 members of the Press Club challenged the House of Commons to a softball game. What they did not know was there were many good country ball players in the class of '68.

Gerry Cobbe, a Liberal member from Portage who is now deceased, played first base. Jack Homer was catcher but he was not in the '68 class. Rocha LaSalle was an excellent glove man and shortstop. I played second base. John Skoberg from Moose Jaw, another railroader and former colleague, played centre field and galloped around catching flies. My colleague from Yorkton-Melville was pitching. In fact he had a no-hitter going for six innings.

Tributes

The Speaker of the day, Hon. Lucien Lamoureux, was a great baseball fan. He set up a temporary backstop on the front lawn of the Parliament buildings. He always showed up at the games. He stood behind the backstop rooting for the MPs. I want to tell this story of how I got an extra question in Question Period.

I made a circus catch on a foul ball. I was playing second base and I caught it out behind first base. Of course I went ass over tea kettle in the course of doing that but when I got back to the bench Mr. Lamoureux came around and said: "Mon collegue, for that catch you get an extra question in Question Period".

That was in June. In late September or October I was selected by my caucus to ask the lead-off question. It concerned box cars, grain movement and so forth. I put my first question and the two supplementaries we are allowed. Then Real Caouette of the Ralliement Credi-tiste who was sitting over here rose to his feet to ask questions as the lead-off questioner for his party.

I leaped to my feet saying: "Mr. Speaker, point of order". In those days one could interrupt anything with a point of order, even Question Period. I think the rules were better then. I said: "You will recall, Sir, an event that occurred last June and I have a further supplementary question". He smiled and said: "The hon. member for Regina-Lake Centre on a further supplementary question". That is how I got four questions in.

Tbmmy Douglas and Stanley Knowles in particular went nuts trying to figure how the heck I pulled that off until I told them it was on account of a foul ball.

The hon. member for Vegreville, a dear friend and colleague, has mentioned a number of people who used to be here. He was interrupted when he mentioned our good buddy Mark Rose. Mark is now the agent general for British Columbia in London, England.

All of the members who were here at that time have gone on to better and greater things. I think a lot of that was because of the schooling they received in this place.

Sir, it has been an honour and a privilege to serve the people in our constituencies, to serve our country and to battle royal here in a partisan way, democratically. Yet, Sir, you will have noticed it takes a heck of a lot longer, twice as long, when we are being nice to each other than it does when we are fighting over something but that is

June 16, 1993

Tributes

okay. We do not do this very often, maybe once every four or five years.

In any event it was a wonderful afternoon. All of us appreciate it. Those of us who were picked out and marked on this occasion appreciate it all the more.

I also want to add my personal tributes to the hon. John Fraser, another dear friend and I hope he will be a fellow goose hunter.

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   CLASS OF '68
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June 15, 1993

Mr. Benjamin:

I suppose we could all line up together.

It has been a pleasure to be your friend and your colleague. We have had many happy times together. That is one thing about this place, certainly with most of us if not all of us. You exemplified that. Whatever we did or said, we never did or said it personally and we never took it personally. That has been a primary class act by our Parliaments and we learned it from the British and others. But you have carried that out all the time. I have never known you to personally object to someone.

You were an asset to us and to this place. We wish you and your family well in the future. Connie sends her best regards to you. I will see you again and we can do some more reminiscing. Good luck, Steve. We will miss you.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   NORTHUMBERLAND STRAIT CROSSING ACT
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June 15, 1993

Mr. Benjamin:

Mr. Speaker, on behalf of my colleagues, my leader, my wife and myself I wish to echo the remarks made by my two colleagues about you.

There was only one time in all the years I have known you or known of you that I was very mad at you and that was when you helped to beat the Saskatchewan Rough Riders.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   NORTHUMBERLAND STRAIT CROSSING ACT
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