Simon Leendert DE JONG

DE JONG, Simon Leendert, B.A.

Personal Data

Party
New Democratic Party
Constituency
Regina--Qu'Appelle (Saskatchewan)
Birth Date
April 9, 1942
Deceased Date
August 18, 2011
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Simon_De_Jong
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=5fd68b94-0c72-4ac3-a336-e9302792c3c8&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
painter, restaurant owner

Parliamentary Career

May 22, 1979 - December 14, 1979
NDP
  Regina East (Saskatchewan)
February 18, 1980 - July 9, 1984
NDP
  Regina East (Saskatchewan)
September 4, 1984 - October 1, 1988
NDP
  Regina East (Saskatchewan)
November 21, 1988 - September 8, 1993
NDP
  Regina--Qu'Appelle (Saskatchewan)
October 25, 1993 - April 27, 1997
NDP
  Regina--Qu'Appelle (Saskatchewan)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 292 of 293)


October 22, 1979

Mr. Simon de Jong (Regina East):

Mr. Speaker, my question is directed to the minister responsible for the Canadian Home Insulation Program. Since it appears home fuel oil prices will again increase this winter, and that parts of Canada might even experience oil shortages, the importance of home insulation both for the consumer and the country becomes ever more critical. Yet during the past several weeks numerous articles have appeared in the press concerning the failure of various home insulation materials-

October 22, 1979

Oral Questions

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   HAZARDOUS PRODUCTS
Full View Permalink

October 22, 1979

Mr. de Jong:

Yes, Mr. Speaker. Have other materials, such as styrofoam and treated wood-shavings been subject to testing methods, and are there any testing procedures to ensure that urea-based foams do not give off highly toxic formaldehyde gas after insulation? Further, what remedial action is the CHIP program prepared to take in cases where hazardous products have been installed in Canadian Homes?

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   HAZARDOUS PRODUCTS
Full View Permalink

October 18, 1979

Mr. de Jong:

May I digress for a moment, Mr. Speaker, to talk about the plight of the many people of Indian ancestry who live in my riding. The Indian and Metis people have some very legitimate grievances which should have been settled years ago. Too many of them live in economic and social squalor, substandard housing and conditions of ill health, unemployment, welfare dependency and cultural alienation. Indian and Metis people do not want to be dependent upon welfare and government hand-outs. For too many years their lives have been ruled by white bureaucrats. The Indian and Metis people want us to adhere to the commitments which were made when this land was developed. They want the tools and resources with which they can achieve their own economic and social self-sufficiency. For too long we have seen Liberal and Conservative government agents steal their land, evade responsibility and create bureaucratic straitjackets. We need clear, honest leadership if we are to avoid increased human tragedy in my community.

Mr. Speaker, the people I represent have a unique social history, for it was in Saskatchewan that farmers first stood up to the grain companies early in this century. Farmers were being robbed by grain buyers at the grain exchange so they organized wheat pools and, through co-operation, they began to take some control over their lives. It was in Regina in 1933 that the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation-the CCF- was formed, a new political party dedicated to the rights of all Canadians, not just those of the privileged few. It was in Saskatchewan, also, that the CCF first formed a government in 1944 when the people of that province embarked on a great social experiment. In the tradition in which they had fought the grain companies they began to tackle other common problems.

In a very short period of time, some 30 years, the people of Saskatchewan have changed the course of Canadian history. For example, when the banks wanted to take the farmers' land. Tommy Douglas passed laws to stop them. In 1948, a hospitalization scheme was introduced because the government believed that every human being should have access to hospital care regardless of how rich or poor they happened to be. Over the years the people have built up a family of Crown corporations, including everything from an energy company to a computer corporation. They are owned by the people and operated in the interests of the people. Medicare was introduced in Saskatchewan in 1962. Now, all Canadians have access to medical services. Unfortunately, the Liberals started to destroy the system and I am afraid the Conservatives will finish the job.

The Address-Mr. de Jong

I would like to point out that in every province except Saskatchewan citizens must pay hundreds of dollars annually for medicare premiums and deterrent fees. In Saskatchewan there is no extra charge for medicare. The people of Saskatchewan do not have to pay extra for health care. It is a right in Saskatchewan, as it should be all across Canada.

How do we do it? A good question. We co-operate. We do not approach problems in the way Liberals and Conservatives do, we co-operate. We have different ideas about organizing the economy. We have different priorities. We care about our fellow citizens. We are our brothers' keeper. In Saskatchewan we believe that the resources belong to the people. We do not let the multi-nationals carry them all away. It might interest people to know that in Saskatchewan there is a dental care program covering children between the ages of four and 12. Soon all young people in the province of Saskatchewan will be covered by a dental plan at no direct cost to the family. It will not cost the people of Saskatchewan thousands of dollars to take care of their children's teeth.

How can we do it? Well, we realize that properly managed Crown corporations serve the people well. We tax resources so that Saskatchewan people reap the benefits from those resources. We use this money to finance our social programs. Last year, for example, the Saskatchewan government got more than ten times the amount from its resources than did the Ontario government. That is how we do it. It is not so difficult. It is a matter of co-operation.

It is exactly the opposite of what this present government is doing. Instead of developing Petro-Canada in the public sector for the benefit of all Canadians, this government would sell off profitable and essential companies to their corporate friends. In Saskatchewan we know the importance of public enterprise. Saskatchewan people own and operate many companies: a transportation company, an oil company, the world's largest potash company, our own energy company and many others. We are not afraid of public ownership. We use it in Saskatchewan for the benefit of everyone.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   SPEECH FROM THE THRONE
Full View Permalink

October 18, 1979

Mr. de Jong:

A political will is necessary. 1 am afraid the government lacks such will. It has embarked upon a program of dismantling CMHC. It is just like PetroCan; they are going to throw Canadian people to the wolves. Their policies will drive up the cost of housing at the same time as destroying CMHC, the only measure of support and protection average and lower income Canadians have to get into the housing market. It is both stupid and cruel.

In conclusion, Canada is facing a number of crises: world energy shortages affect our lifestyle, inflation and economic uncertainty undermine our labour, environmental pollution threatens our health. We have reached a point in human history where man has finally become capable of total selfdestruction. After millions of years of survival we stand on the brink of extinction. These are sobering thoughts, but if hon. members have been listening, they will know that 1 am not alone in this belief. Concerned thinkers and scientists throughout the world are raising their concerns. A new approach to development and economics is required. We cannot afford to continue with the outdated concepts of growth which we have been promoting for the past 200 years. We must have development which makes sense for people, not for profits! In some small way this was understood many years ago in Saskatchewan. The people realized that co-operation would make life better for everyone, so they co-operated. It is not perfect, but people understand that collective action can be taken to solve problems.

The Address-Mr. G. Richardson

The people of Saskatchewan woke up to the fact that the free market system was exploiting them, that the free market system was not so free, that the free market system works well for bosses and owners but does not do very much for the little guy, the average worker and farmer in the country. We in Saskatchewan fought back. We started to take control of our destiny. Saskatchewan Crown corporations are working in the interests of the province. Any profits that are produced are turned over to the provincial treasury to fund social programs and further economic development. Saskatchewan people own a large chunk of their province through Crown investments. Saskatchewan people own and operate these companies. Saskatchewan Government Insurance will never leave Saskatchewan as Sun Life left Quebec. The people of Saskatchewan own their own insurance company; they direct its activities.

Canadians can learn much from the Saskatchewan experience. They can learn to take control over their lives, to direct their own future and to co-operate. Also Canadians will learn that governments can plan ahead, that governments can make life easier and our rewards fuller. Today Canadians are seeking a greater voice in the development of this country. They have good reason to doubt the ability of the federal government to look after their best interests. While Liberals and Conservatives continue to promote their outdated economic theories, our party will demonstrate that we have alternatives, that we can plan an economy which will reduce unemployment, decrease inflation and provide proper health and social services for all Canadians. We will not allow industries to pollute our air, water or land. We will ensure that the environment is cleaned up and protected for future generations. We are not pessimists, we are optimists. It is not a dog-eat-dog world as far as we are concerned. We believe in co-operation and sharing. We are our brother's keeper. We have faith in the human race. We have faith in people's ability to work together to solve their common problems. We have faith in the future. We have faith in the vast human and social potential which can make this land and this planet a peaceful place in which to live, free from starvation and want, exploitation and greed.

Perhaps the best way to sum up would be to paraphrase the first leader of our movement, J. S. Woodsworth, who said, "What we desire for ourselves ... we demand for all".

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   SPEECH FROM THE THRONE
Full View Permalink

October 18, 1979

Mr. Simon de Jong (Regina East):

Mr. Speaker, it is with great pleasure that I rise to take part in this throne speech debate. For me, it is a special honour to stand here today, for I came as an immigrant to this country. My parents came to Canada after experiencing the horrors of the last world war. They came in search of a peaceful place in which to raise their children and they found a home in Regina, Saskatchewan. It is therefore a special honour for me to stand here today as a representative of the community my parents chose as home and in which I was raised.

The community has all the rich social fabric which makes up our country today. Long before the Europeans came, Indians lived on the prairies hunting vast herds of buffalo. Then the explorers came, establishing missions and posts like Lebret and Fort Qu'Appelle. Later came the many waves of European settlers. They came from the Ukraine, the British Isles, Germany, Russia and many other lands. This heritage is all part of our community.

October 18, 1979

The area I represent has a very interesting history. It was not far from Fort Qu'Appelle that General Middleton set off northward to put down the rebellion of the northwest peoples led by Gabrielle Dumont and Louis Riel. It was in Regina that the Conservative government of the day hung Louis Riel in 1885.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   SPEECH FROM THE THRONE
Full View Permalink