George Alexander CRUICKSHANK

CRUICKSHANK, George Alexander, M.C.

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
Fraser Valley (British Columbia)
Birth Date
February 13, 1897
Deceased Date
November 17, 1970
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Cruickshank_(Canadian_politician)
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=5d3732c0-c34a-4b4c-92df-53c93007c5cd&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
farmer

Parliamentary Career

March 26, 1940 - April 16, 1945
LIB
  Fraser Valley (British Columbia)
June 11, 1945 - April 30, 1949
LIB
  Fraser Valley (British Columbia)
June 27, 1949 - June 13, 1953
LIB
  Fraser Valley (British Columbia)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 898 of 899)


June 17, 1940

Mr. CRUICKSHANK:

Mr. Chairman, we will not lose the war, but, win, lose or draw, Canada must be and always will be an exporting nation. Despite that fact, only twenty-seven members of the party to which I have the privilege of belonging were present when the estimates for the Department of Agriculture were before the committee. I was ashamed of my party and of the opposition, and I want to speak freely.

I know industrial Ontario. I did not intend to rise in my place and make a speech, but I have received letters of criticism from my constituency. I am going to take hon. members into my confidence because I have never been accused, like the leader of the opposition, of having nothing to say. In my own riding I have been accused of having too much to say. I joined the army on August 9, 1914, and went to the last war. When I returned I thought that as a returned soldier I could contribute something to the future of Canada, and as a farmer from a farming constituency I still believe that I have a contribution to make. I came back to Ottawa believing honestly that my contribution would be less if I talked too much than if I kept quiet. But then I began to discover that some hon. members wanted to talk; they wanted to read speeches into Hansard so that their constituents might see them.

I want to be elected four years from now, but I am prepared to go back to my constituency and say to my people, "If I cannot contribute something to the welfare of Canada, and in particular to the welfare of the people in the constituency of Fraser Valley, I would prefer to be left at home." I believe that in this house there have been too many cases of the pot calling the kettle black.

My experience as the reeve of a municipality has shown me much that may not have been disclosed to other people. I know that in municipalities throughout that province there are hungry women and children, yet we are given the old poppycock that we cannot find money. Of course we can have $700,000,000 to carry on a war; I believe we could find 81,700,000,000, and must do so, if necessary, to win the war. But hon. members are not going to get away with it very long if they accept the old story about sound money, and the story that we cannot have money to put men and women to work, although there seems to be plenty of it to fight a war.

In British Columbia ten months ago they put boys into Okalla, a prison in our province, because they could not find work. I do not want to criticize my party, the government or anybody else, but I do want to contribute

S14 COMMONS

Unemployment Relief-Mr. Mayhew

to winning this war. I ask the powers that be, what will be the good of sound money if we lose the war? Let us get on with the war and win it, and let us have less of this poppycock on each side of the house from hon. members trying to get on Hansard. Let us make a real record that we can look back on with pride four or five years from now.

Topic:   UNEMPLOYMENT RELIEF
Subtopic:   ALLEVIATION OF UNEMPLOYMENT AND AGRICULTURAL DISTRESS-UNDERTAKINGS IN GENERAL INTEREST AND FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE TO PROVINCES
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June 17, 1940

Mr. CRUICKSHANK:

I have been a

reeve in a municipality of British Columbia for the last ten years, and I believe I know what I am talking about. I say that we cannot hope to continue in western Canada, and particularly in British Columbia, unless we have an adjustment of taxation. The only source of adjustment we can have is with the dominion government, and I trust that the government will take that point into consideration.

I am a new member, and I may be speaking out of order, but all hon. members have sipoken out of order long before now; they have been reading speeches somebody else wrote for them. Nobody wrote mine.

The farmers of the constituency of Fraser Valley, and those in other parts of British Columbia are in a similar position, are selling either at or below the cost of production. They have been doing that for the last eight years, and it is a condition which cannot be continued. A few days ago the estimates for the Department of Agriculture were before a committee of the house. I am sorry to say that only twenty-seven members of the party supporting the administration-I counted them-were present when the estimates for that Department were up for discussion.

Topic:   UNEMPLOYMENT RELIEF
Subtopic:   ALLEVIATION OF UNEMPLOYMENT AND AGRICULTURAL DISTRESS-UNDERTAKINGS IN GENERAL INTEREST AND FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE TO PROVINCES
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June 11, 1940

Mr. CRUICKSHANK:

Mr. Chairman-

Topic:   MUNITIONS AND SUPPLY
Subtopic:   194U
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June 3, 1940

Mr. CRUICKSHANK:

Will the minister see that British Columbia is reincluded in

the act?

Topic:   FARMERS' CREDITORS
Subtopic:   AMENDMENT OF ARRANGEMENT ACT AS TO PROPOSALS FOR COMPOSITION, ETC., IN MANITOBA
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June 3, 1940

Mr. CRUICKSHANK:

The nineteen

cases are those which are being heard, but probably there are in my own district 290 cases to which this treatment should have applied, and which have every right to it.

Topic:   FARMERS' CREDITORS
Subtopic:   AMENDMENT OF ARRANGEMENT ACT AS TO PROPOSALS FOR COMPOSITION, ETC., IN MANITOBA
Full View Permalink