Paul Edmund MCRAE

MCRAE, Paul Edmund, B.A.

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
Thunder Bay--Atikokan (Ontario)
Birth Date
October 20, 1924
Deceased Date
November 3, 1992
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_McRae
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=5d169cac-f116-46fd-9ff6-73cffa8348d5&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
school principal

Parliamentary Career

October 30, 1972 - May 9, 1974
LIB
  Fort William (Ontario)
July 8, 1974 - March 26, 1979
LIB
  Fort William (Ontario)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Postmaster General (October 10, 1975 - September 30, 1976)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of National Health and Welfare (October 1, 1976 - September 30, 1977)
May 22, 1979 - December 14, 1979
LIB
  Thunder Bay--Atikokan (Ontario)
February 18, 1980 - July 9, 1984
LIB
  Thunder Bay--Atikokan (Ontario)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 1 of 136)


June 20, 1984

Mr. McRae:

Mr. Speaker, I rise because I consider the proceedings are getting ridiculous. It seems to me that we have all made our point. I would suggest that the three House Leaders absent themselves from the next vote. I would be glad to absent myself as well so the two Opposition Parties would not consider there was a unevenness between the two sides. Perhaps the House Leaders can come to some agreement as to how this thing can be ended. I do not believe the public of Canada finds this a very pleasant proceeding and finds it ridiculous.

All I am suggesting is that three House Leaders absent themselves for a few moments. I would be glad to do what I said I would do, absent myself from the vote so there would be no unevenness. Let us see if we can come to some reasonable conclusion to what is becoming a farce.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   CANADIAN SECURITY INTELLIGENCE SERVICE ACT
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June 20, 1984

Mr. McRae:

Point of order.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   CANADIAN SECURITY INTELLIGENCE SERVICE ACT
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June 4, 1984

Mr. Paul E. McRae (Thunder Bay-Atikokan) moved

that Bill C-215, an Act to amend the Public Service Employment Act (staff of Members of the House of Commons), be read the second time and referred to the Standing Committee on Miscellaneous Estimates.

He said: Mr. Speaker, it would be proper for me to indicate that while my name is on the Bill, the work which has been done in putting the Bill together has been done by the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister for International Trade (Mr. Blaker) who is also the Hon. Member for Lachine. However, as a Parliamentary Secretary I am informed that he cannot be the author of a Bill. Therefore, I will say a few words and will move a motion at the end of my remarks.

I am concerned about the people who work for Members of Parliament. They have given faithful service, are well-acquainted with the operations of Government, have worked long hours, and have gained a great understanding of the various departments and what government is all about. But, for one reason or another, when the Member of Parliament for whom they work ceases to be a Member at the end of a particular term or at any particular time when the Member is defeated or when he decides not to run in the election, they are out of a job. I am told that in every Parliament approximately 100 Members cease to be Members of Parliament for one reason or another. What this Bill says is that after approximately three years of service, these people should have the same priorities as a public servant. I understand, Mr. Speaker, that these priorities, in terms of moving into the civil service, are held by people working in Minister's offices and so on. We feel that those persons who work hard for Members of Parliament should have that same privilege after three years of service. I, therefore, feel this Bill is very important. I understand there is some disposition on all sides to let this legislation go forward. There may be some amendments which will be required but, certainly, we hope that this Bill will be accepted by all Parties.

In view of the fact that I was not the author of the Bill, although I was certainly involved in and very much in favour of it, and in view of the fact that the author of the Bill is the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister for International Trade, the Hon. Member for Lachine, I would ask for unanimous agreement of the House to allow the Parliamentary Secretary to speak for the next few minutes in my place so that the balance of my time would be given over to him. I believe that would require unanimous consent, but if that is possible I believe it would give a better understanding of what is in the Bill and would not necessitate the Hon. Member's speaking at a later date. If it is possible, I would yield the floor, as is common in the United States, to the Hon. Member, with unanimous consent.

June 4, 1984

Public Service Employment Act

Topic:   PRIVATE MEMBERS' BUSINESS-PUBLIC BILLS
Subtopic:   AMENDMENT RESPECTING STAFF OF MEMBERS OF THE HOUSE OF COMMONS
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May 29, 1984

Mr. McRae:

I will do that.

Topic:   PRIVATE MEMBERS' BUSINESS-MOTIONS
Subtopic:   NUCLEAR DISARMAMENT
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May 29, 1984

Mr. Paul E. McRae (Thunder Bay-Atikokan):

Mr. Speaker, I find myself rising for the second time in three days to debate essentially the same motion. I respect the ruling of the Chair on this. I find the motion supportable and support the intent of the motion, but I worry about why we are debating a Bill three times which really will do nothing to prevent the holocaust which I think is going to occur if we do not bring the super powers together to stop the warring which is going on.

I do not think that our being pure is going to influence either of the super powers in the direction in which they must go. In response to a question asked of the very distinguished Rear Admiral Carroll at a gathering in Toronto in March, he said that the armaments, the computerization of arms, the speed and so on would make a nuclear war very probable in about six to eight years. We all know there is no possibility that human life could continue in any normal fashion after such a war. The social values which we all appreciate would cease to exist under these circumstances. It seems that a hardness has developed between the two super powers at this point which could very well continue, depending upon what happens in the American election. I have no qualms about talking about American internal politics because the Ambassador from that country has no qualms about talking about how we run our operation.

I believe that unless there is a change in the scene in the United States, this hardening will become much worse. I would be much happier if I heard Members of the NDP

talking about this very serious problem rather than seeing the answer as our being pure.

The problem possibly stems from the attitude of Hon. Members on the other side. Because they essentially have not held power or been close to power for the last 20 years, they find it hard to deal with reality. When we have to deal with our relationship with NATO, when we have to deal with the Government of the United States and the Government of the Soviet Union and when we have to try and move those Governments, the problem becomes very different.

Let me give you an idea of that. Let us suppose that tomorrow, a motion is put before the House to support the ten points common ground that were listed by the Prime Minister (Mr. Trudeau). Suppose that motion contains some additional points calling for no first use and no testing of the Cruise. Those are things that I support. However, if we along with the other countries presented such a motion to the two super powers, something which I think should be done, then the same thing would happen as happened to the motion of the four-continent group, a motion into which I have been very proud to have had some input. Within 20 minutes, the U.S. Government would reject the entire thing. How would that do anything in terms of closing the gap between the two super powers?

Topic:   PRIVATE MEMBERS' BUSINESS-MOTIONS
Subtopic:   NUCLEAR DISARMAMENT
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