Robert James WOOD

WOOD, Robert James

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
Selkirk (Manitoba)
Birth Date
March 27, 1886
Deceased Date
August 8, 1954
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_James_Wood
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=5a3a6c57-7d47-42b8-b583-95d340d3fc66&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
merchant

Parliamentary Career

June 27, 1949 - June 13, 1953
LIB
  Norquay (Manitoba)
August 10, 1953 - April 12, 1957
LIB
  Selkirk (Manitoba)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 9 of 11)


April 30, 1952

Mr. Wood:

Yes, of the Young Progressive Conservative Association. As he is one who is in such an important position, I would presume that he is here voicing Conservative policy. He says here-and you will find this at page 491 of Hansard of October 29, 1951:

Again I urge the government to prohibit immediately all meat exports to the United States, so that the price of beef, for instance,-which is a basic food-may return to a level that would be commensurate with the income of the average Canadian, while still enabling western cattle breeders to make a reasonable profit. As long as we export our meat to the United States where salaries are much higher than in Canada,-

You will notice what he says about salaries, namely that they are much higher in the United States than they are in Canada.

-our fellow citizens will have to go without meat . . .

And so on. That is a statement of which I hope our cattle producers throughout the country will take note. As he is the president of the young Conservatives of Canada, I presume that the Conservative party will agree with that statement.

I have here a statement by the hon. member for St. John's West (Mr. Browne) and I was rather surprised at this statement in view of the fact that he represents a new province. Of course, if the country is full of industries I can understand the statement. But if it is not full of industries-and I doubt that it is-then I cannot understand this statement coming from a man who is considered to

hold a fairly high position in that party.

I might say that this statement may be found at page 735 of Hansard of November 5, 1951. As he is there reported, the hon. member said:

I just want to draw to the attention of the house the fact that we import about $1,500 million worth of goods a year from the United States,-

That is all right.

-upon which a large amount of customs duty is paid. I suppose the customs duties collected by the Canadian government must run into an amount of about $250 million.

I would judge that they run into more than that. I would judge that they run to at least $300 million. He continues:

I do not know how much is collected from the United States, but there must be a substantial proportion of that amount. The parliamentary assistant to the Minister of Finance is present in the chamber listening to what is being said. Would he approve such a policy? What would the other countries of the commonwealth say? They would say: What? You are going to make a special

friend of the United States and let their goods in free? What about the rest of the world? The United States is the greatest country in the world at the present time. You are going to help her to oecome greater; you are going to throw your doors open to the United States, and are not going to give us any chance. What about the people in Canada who are working in factories that were built up by this protection? Are we going to throw the doors open to allow foreign goods to come into this country? Such a suggestion is fantastic . . .

Mr. Speaker, I will say that such a suggestion is not fantastic. I would also say, speaking about inflation and the high cost of living, that I believe if the tariffs were lowered by 25 per cent tomorrow we would have a reduction of at least 15 points in our cost of living index inside of ten days.

The automobile industry has become extremely strong in this country. The Ford motor company and the Chrysler corporation have built up a great city in Windsor. Certainly General Motors have built a great city in Oshawa. They all complain of the corporation taxes being too high. Nevertheless, I note that General Motors in Oshawa are extending their plant at a cost of $8 million this year.

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
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April 30, 1952

Mr. Wood:

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
Full View Permalink

April 30, 1952

Mr. Wood:

I can remember that in those days, because a farmer could not get gas to run his car, he would take out the engine, put a tongue and doubletree in front of his car, and pull it around with horses. We see those old cars sitting in barnyard corners today, and they are known as Bennett wagons. In western Canada the Bennett government will go down in history for having at least introduced the Bennett wagon. That resulted partly from the policy of Canada first, and that is what might happen again if we had another meeting of commonwealth nations which would introduce measures that would interfere with trade with the United States.

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
Full View Permalink

April 30, 1952

Mr. Wood:

That is right; too poor to buy. I want to say that in my constituency and our province of Manitoba we caught in the last year over 30 million pounds of fish. In my constituency alone we caught over 10 million pounds. When we go down to the cities of Windsor, Hamilton or Toronto, however, and ask those cities if they will buy our fish, they say, "No, we have lots of fish of our own."

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
Full View Permalink

April 30, 1952

Mr. Wood:

Ninety-eight per cent of the fish caught in my constituency is shipped to Minneapolis and Chicago. When we get cash back-and that is what we get; and we are considered a sheltered market-we are compelled by this tariff barrier to send the money down to central Canada for the goods we require for our livelihood.

I consider that that is discrimination against the consumers in western Canada. I consider-and I am sorry to have to say this, but I must do so-that it has cost Manitoba too much to belong to confederation. Tariffs are just a handout to industry.

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
Full View Permalink