Robert James WOOD

WOOD, Robert James

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
Selkirk (Manitoba)
Birth Date
March 27, 1886
Deceased Date
August 8, 1954
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_James_Wood
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=5a3a6c57-7d47-42b8-b583-95d340d3fc66&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
merchant

Parliamentary Career

June 27, 1949 - June 13, 1953
LIB
  Norquay (Manitoba)
August 10, 1953 - April 12, 1957
LIB
  Selkirk (Manitoba)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 7 of 11)


April 30, 1952

Mr. Wood:

We cannot sell any here, and that is what I want to come to now. We produced over a billion and a half dollars' worth of goods, and when western producers come to sell their goods they cannot sell them in Ontario. We have to sell our goods

The Budget-Mr. Wood throughout the world over the top of tariff barriers. We have been able to sell our cattle in the United States, thanks to the Mackenzie King government. In 1936, through the good offices of the late W. L. Mackenzie King, we were allowed to sell to the United States a total of 250,000 cattle a year, and from that time right up until today our cattle market has been increasing in price. The outbreak of foot-and-mouth disease has put an end to that, however. If we are to go back and depend on the British market, as we did prior to 1948, our prices are not going to be very good in this country, and I am afraid our production of cattle in this country will go down a great deal also.

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
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April 30, 1952

Mr. Wood:

The tough times on the prairies under R. B. Bennett are not going to be forgotten for quite a while. During those days the farmers could not get cash for their eggs, their butter, their grain, their cattle or their hogs. As a result they could hardly get enough cash to buy the necessities of life for their families.

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
Full View Permalink

April 30, 1952

Mr. Wood:

I hope so too. I am sure the Toronto Star and the Globe and Mail as well would learn a lesson. The general tariff on these goods, Mr. Speaker, is as follows: On stoves, it is 30 per cent; washing machines, 35 per cent; and on toasters, 30 per cent; irons, 271 per cent; mixmasters, 35 per cent, and so on down the line.

Then, we come to shirts. The British preference on shirts made from woven fabrics, wholly of cotton, is 25 per cent. The mostfavoured-nation rate is 25 per cent, and the general tariff rate is 35 per cent plus 4 cents per pound. You will notice that 25 per cent just works out to the difference between the United States price and the Canadian price on those shirts. That is what industry in Canada is doing. They are just calculating the retail value of these goods from the United States, not only for refrigerators, washing machines, automobiles but also shirts that are made in Canada, and then adding on the amount of the tariff; that is what the customers are paying.

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
Full View Permalink

April 30, 1952

Mr. Wood:

Before closing, I wish to comment upon the budget. I believe the budget is a good one. I wish to commend the Minister of Finance (Mr. Abbott) for budgeting on a pay-as-you-go basis. If we are going to cut down on our taxation it would mean that we would have to sell bonds and borrow in order to carry on. I think that would be a wrong policy for Canada at this time, with the country as prosperous as it is.

Again may I say that I commend the budget, and I am well pleased with it. I am not satisfied to see that tariffs have not been

The Budget-Mr. Wood reduced but, apart from that fact, I am pleased with the budget and offer my congratulations to the Minister of Finance.

At this point I should like to voice my gratitude to the Minister of Trade and Commerce (Mr. Howe) and the Minister of Agriculture (Mr. Gardiner) for having secured markets in past years. I must say that it is not the price one gets for his product that means everything. Price is a secondary consideration. The fact that he has a market for his goods is the important thing.

One has only to refer to what the condition was in the days of the late R. B. Bennett. He was going to get us markets, and give us big prices. But he did not get the markets. He did not make an effort during that time to get markets for our cattle, and when the United States government passed a measure of reciprocity in 1934 he neglected to do anything on our behalf. It was not until 1936, when the Mackenzie King government took office, that we were able to make any kind of satisfactory deal. So there is no use of members in the opposition talking about markets.

I am not kicking about prices. Although they might not be as high as might be desired, let us have the markets. I offer my word of gratitude, as I have said, to those two ministers, because they have done more for the people in western Canada than have all other men put together.

I could speak much longer, but I believe I shall not do so at this time. I thank you, Mr. Speaker, for your indulgence.

On motion of Mr. Courtemanche the debate was adjourned.

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
Full View Permalink

April 30, 1952

Mr. Wood:

We cannot.

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
Full View Permalink