Robert James WOOD

WOOD, Robert James

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
Selkirk (Manitoba)
Birth Date
March 27, 1886
Deceased Date
August 8, 1954
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_James_Wood
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=5a3a6c57-7d47-42b8-b583-95d340d3fc66&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
merchant

Parliamentary Career

June 27, 1949 - June 13, 1953
LIB
  Norquay (Manitoba)
August 10, 1953 - April 12, 1957
LIB
  Selkirk (Manitoba)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 11 of 11)


March 2, 1950

Mr. Wood:

As a result of that agreement, our cattle immediately advanced about four cents a pound while the quotas were being filled. In other words, instead of selling our cattle at from half a cent to two cents a pound, we were getting five and six cents a pound. That was in 1936; and ever since then, year by year, our cattle have been going up in price until today our best steers are bringing twenty-four cents a pound in the Winnipeg stockyards. Our cattle prices never went back since 1936, and we still have a Liberal government.

I want to commend this government and the ministers responsible for our trade agreements during the past fifteen years. I do not believe we are going to have a depression, at any rate while we have a' Liberal government. Certainly we may take lower prices for many of our products; but as long as we

have a government that will endeavour to find markets for our surplus products, the likelihood of a depression is remote.

Topic:   SPEECH FROM THE THRONE
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON ADDRESS IN REPLY
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March 2, 1950

Mr. Wood:

Our farmers were never better off than they are today.

I should like to commend this government for having established trade missions in many countries throughout the world for the purpose of seeking markets. I should like to commend this government on its attitude towards trade with our neighbours and best customers, the United States. We should go all-out and use every means in our power to increase our trade with the United States. In 1949 the United States took over fifty per cent of all our exports. We must give the United States every consideration in our trade relations, and under no circumstances must we discriminate against her.

I should like to commend this government on the floor price set on eggs. I do not believe in a floor price set too high on any goods, because that would tend to allow stocks to pile up in this country. It is not a floor price which will solve the egg situation; it is a market. The same is true with regard to all our surplus products.

Any government which, through its lack of effort or through restricted measures, fails to provide markets for the surplus primary products of this country would find that a floor would not hold for long. Let us endeavour, by every means possible, to create a multilateral trade system among the nations of the world, to operate with some kind of an international banking system. Let us reduce or wipe away tariffs and trade blocs. There are many countries of the world which would like to buy our surplus products.

I want to commend this government for its efforts toward the construction of a'trans-Canada highway. This is a project that will be welcomed by every Canadian. I also want to commend this government on a bill which was introduced and passed about six years ago, known as the Farm Improvement Loans Act. Prior to the passing of this bill, in order to secure money to finance the purchase of farm machinery, trucks, farm buildings, building repairs, drainage and fencing, farmers were obliged to pay excessive interest rates ranging from twelve per cent to fifteen per cent, made up of interest, appreciation and insurance. But now this money costs the farmers only five per cent through the Farm Improvement Loans Act. By this bill the western farmers have saved millions of dollars in interest charges; and although the act has been operating now for

nearly six years, I understand the government guarantee has cost the federal treasury nothing.

Early pioneers came to this country knowing it to be a land of freedom. They prided themselves on their individual dignity and freedom. But there are amongst us today men who would destroy that freedom if they had the opportunity to set up a state control of our economy. We must guard well our traditional freedom.

Just forty miles from Winnipeg, on the west shore of lake Winnipeg, we have slimmer resorts at Sans Souci, Matlock, Whyte-wold, Ponemah, Winnipeg Beach, Sandy Hook and Gimli, each with its lovely sand beach, well shaded shores with maples, elms and evergreens. I might say at Winnipeg Beach alone during the summer vacation about 40,000 people come from many parts of Canada and the central states to spend their holidays.

(Translation):

Topic:   SPEECH FROM THE THRONE
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON ADDRESS IN REPLY
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