Alexander Kenneth MACLEAN

MACLEAN, The Hon. Alexander Kenneth, P.C., LL.B.

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
Halifax (Nova Scotia)
Birth Date
October 18, 1869
Deceased Date
July 31, 1942
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alexander_Kenneth_Maclean
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=56fdc84e-aaff-46fe-bf93-d6f1014c6188&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
lawyer

Parliamentary Career

November 3, 1904 - September 17, 1908
LIB
  Lunenburg (Nova Scotia)
October 26, 1908 - July 29, 1911
LIB
  Lunenburg (Nova Scotia)
September 21, 1911 - October 6, 1917
LIB
  Halifax (Nova Scotia)
December 17, 1917 - October 4, 1921
UNION
  Halifax (Nova Scotia)
  • Minister Without Portfolio (October 23, 1917 - February 24, 1920)
December 6, 1921 - November 1, 1923
LIB
  Halifax (Nova Scotia)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 1 of 1122)


June 29, 1923

Mr. MACLEAN (Halifax):

I might say that the construction of a grain elevator at Halifax was projected in 1912, under the government then led by Sir Robert Borden, and which my hon. friend supported. In that year my right hon. friend will remember that it was decided that the railway terminals of Halifax were to be properly or improperly- improperly, I think-removed from one end of the city to the other, and the erection of this elevator was a portion of that project. The present elevator, which was constructed jointly, I think, by the city, the government of Nova Scotia, and the Dominion government many years ago, cannot now very well be used by reason of the fact that the railway terminal facilities have been moved to another end of the city. Further, the present grain elevator is obsolete and not suitable for the handling of grain.

I cannot say, and I am sure my hon. friend cannot very accurately tell us, what quantity of grain has gone through the Halifax elevator. It is true that port is not a big grain exporting port. The business men of Halifax hardly expect it to be a large grain exporting port, but still a certain quantity may very profitably find an outlet through Halifax. I have been personally advised by two or three of the largest shipping companies using that port during the past winter, that a modem elevator of a million bushels capacity would be of great service to the port and to shipping. At the present time a great deal of shipping might go to Halifax were it not for the reason that they are unable to secure grain as a partial cargo.

Topic:   EDITION
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June 29, 1923

Mr. MACLEAN (Halifax):

I am rather at a loss to understand just what the right hon. leader of the Opposition means by the lemarks he has made and the remarks which he has previously made, but which I did not hear. He was criticizing the remarks of another hon. member this evening and suggesting that the hon. member was tired or sleepy, possibly dreaming. This may be the reason of the remarks of my hon. friend iu respect of certain expenditures in the county of Halifax.

Topic:   EDITION
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June 29, 1923

Mr. MACLEAN (Halifax):

I have that

from persons who have actual knowledge.

Topic:   EDITION
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June 29, 1923

Mr. MACLEAN (Halifax):

No grain went through the port of Halifax during the war.

Topic:   EDITION
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June 29, 1923

Mr. MACLEAN (Halifax):

My hon. friend is entirely wrong in saying that very small grain shipments have gone through the port of Halifax. It is true that grain shipments from Halifax have not been large in any one year, but a substantial quantity of grain has gone through that port. There is a difference in the freight rates as between St. John and Halifax of one cent per 100 pounds. I hope, however, this differential will be abolished as it should be. I am instructed that it costs more to move grain from St. John to St. John West where the grain is placed on board steamers than it would cost to move that grain to Halifax.

Topic:   EDITION
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