Prosper BOULANGER

BOULANGER, Prosper

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
Mercier (Quebec)
Birth Date
November 17, 1918
Deceased Date
December 5, 2002
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prosper_Boulanger
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=54dbd3e5-6165-4cbb-a253-0a600f3b13a3&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
businessman

Parliamentary Career

June 18, 1962 - February 6, 1963
LIB
  Mercier (Quebec)
April 8, 1963 - September 8, 1965
LIB
  Mercier (Quebec)
November 8, 1965 - April 23, 1968
LIB
  Mercier (Quebec)
June 25, 1968 - September 1, 1972
LIB
  Mercier (Quebec)
  • Assistant Deputy Chair of Committees of the Whole (September 30, 1971 - May 9, 1974)
October 30, 1972 - May 9, 1974
LIB
  Mercier (Quebec)
  • Assistant Deputy Chair of Committees of the Whole (September 30, 1971 - May 9, 1974)
July 8, 1974 - March 26, 1979
LIB
  Mercier (Quebec)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 3 of 297)


March 16, 1979

Mr. Prosper Boulanger (Mercier):

Mr. Speaker, I regret I have only a few minutes left to speak to such an important bill, namely Bill C-221 introduced by my distinguished and hon. colleague for Laprairie who, in the process of drafting this bill, must certainly have carried out very extensive research and studies in order to come up with such a well substantiated and well explained bill. This is what leads me to draw your attention to the explanatory note.

Mr. Speaker, it is said that there is an increasing awareness in Canada of the potential for rapid transit or recreational use of abandoned railway lines or unused railway rights-of-way. As a matter of fact, in Montreal a few weeks ago, Mr. Speaker, we attended a meeting of the mayors of the municipalities of the Montreal area and the president of that organization, Mayor Jean Corbeil of the city of Anjou, was referring to the serious problems of public transportation and in particular railway transportation on the north and south shore into and out of Montreal, and also between Mirabel and Montreal. At that time, I recall the Minister of Justice (Mr. Lalonde) said that we had over $60 million set aside for the Montreal island municipalities to be used for upgrading the public transportation system. So the issue is not then the removal of rails but rather the improvement of the service, of the cars and transportation in general so that the fares will be lower. We had agreed, that is to say the government in the person of the Minister of Justice, to contribute up to an amount of-

Topic:   PRIVATE MEMBERS' PUBLIC BILLS
Subtopic:   ABANDONED RAILWAY LINES CONSERVATION ADVISORY AUTHORITY ACT
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March 15, 1979

Mr. Prosper Boulanger (Mercier):

Mr. Speaker, I want to speak to that. In view of the few minutes left, I might not be able to go into as much detail as I would have liked. As 1 will be referring to notes that were prepared for me in English I will be speaking mainly in English about the cost of the documents.

The cost of tabling the contract documents as requested by the hon. member for Winnipeg South Centre (Mr. McKenzie) would be excessive. In our view, the existing process of disseminating contracting information to the public has significant benefits in terms of prudence and probity in the use of taxpayers' funds and equity of opportunity for interested suppliers. For example, the supply administration's contracting system encourages government agencies to take advantage of the DSS policy to buy if something can be bought more effectively and cheaply in the private sector than it can be "made" within government. By wide dissemination of contracting information and opportunities, business is encouraged to increase its share of activity in providing goods or services which the government may have provided in the past. 1 will describe a number of examples of make or buy initiatives that are well known to Canadian suppliers.

Take printing for example. Printing encompasses the two distinct modes, the "make" manufacturing printing performed in the main plant, Hull-

Topic:   THE ROYAL ASSENT
Subtopic:   PRIVATE MEMBERS' MOTIONS FOR PAPERS
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March 15, 1979

Mr. Boulanger:

Mr. Speaker, 1 do not intend to comment on the point of order, but that would be one of my arguments: we have already spent four minutes on question of procedure and I do not see why further time should be taken away from me.

Topic:   THE ROYAL ASSENT
Subtopic:   PRIVATE MEMBERS' MOTIONS FOR PAPERS
Full View Permalink

March 15, 1979

Mr. Prosper Boulanger (Mercier):

Mr. Speaker, before we went up to the Senate chamber 1 referred to the fact that my colleague, the hon. member for St. Catharines (Mr. Parent), mentioned the introduction of bulletin board bidding for government printing requirements. This new technique provides a unique opportunity for local printers right across the country to bid on government requirements. In the past they were hindered by the need to get bids in from remote locations. That was with regard to printing.

With regard to publishing, the publishing centre was integrated with the department when Information Canada was disbanded in April, 1976. Its objective is to supply effectively priced publications of various departments and agencies to the Canadian public.

The "make or buy" policy was an element in the decision to close the six Canadian government bookstores. The government run bookstores were providing relatively few Canadians with a costly service that could not be self-supporting on the basis of sales revenues. With the closing of the bookstores more members of the Canadian bookselling community are being encouraged to become government sales agents, and annual savings in excess of $1 million are being achieved.

Mr. Speaker, the government rightly believes that all qualified businesses in Canada have the right to know the requirements of the state. The DSS has allowed everyone to have access to public contracts. Whatever their size or field of endeavour, all Canadian businesses are entitled to do business with the federal government.

Our policy is guided first of all by the principle of equal opportunities for all suppliers. This principle is foremost in our daily activities and ensures the impartiality of our negotiations. By using objective business practices and recognizing equal opportunities for potential suppliers in all regions of the country, the department applies this principle to its publicity methods as well as its information and advertising programs.

In the field of contract negotiation, the department sees to it that the contractors have equal opportunities to do business with the government, because we are convinced that it is a right and not a privilege for any businessman to be able to deal

March 15, 1979

with the Canadian government. It is quite easy to do business with the Department of Supply and Services. Our procurement methods ensure real integrity and accessibility guarantees for our department. These principles are reflected by the following initiatives, which are as follows-

Topic:   THE ROYAL ASSENT
Subtopic:   PRIVATE MEMBERS' MOTIONS FOR PAPERS
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March 15, 1979

Mr. Boulanger:

I turn, now, to printing. Printing encompasses two distinct modes, the manufacturing printing performed in the main plant, Hull, and in over 100 plants and copy centres across the country; and the purchasing function which, through a consolidated purchasing capability, distributes federal printing requirements to the industry in Canada on a competitive basis. This year, over $130 million worth of government printing requirements will be handled by the supply administration. Some years ago, over 60 per cent of the printing business was made in government facilities with 40 per cent going to the private sector. Through a concerted effort by the supply administration's printing products centre-

1 guess I have to stop, Mr. Speaker.

Topic:   THE ROYAL ASSENT
Subtopic:   PRIVATE MEMBERS' MOTIONS FOR PAPERS
Full View Permalink