Richard Langton BAKER

BAKER, Richard Langton

Personal Data

Party
Conservative (1867-1942)
Constituency
Eglinton (Ontario)
Birth Date
May 15, 1870
Deceased Date
January 3, 1951
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Langton_Baker
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=52af64cd-5d2d-482a-afff-f94833c2439c&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
manufacturer

Parliamentary Career

October 29, 1925 - July 2, 1926
CON
  Toronto Northeast (Ontario)
July 28, 1930 - August 14, 1935
CON
  Toronto Northeast (Ontario)
October 14, 1935 - January 25, 1940
CON
  Eglinton (Ontario)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 63 of 67)


May 6, 1926

Mr. BAKER:

Quite right, there were no

asses imported and also none bred here. Referring to page 1925 of the same book I find that in Saskatchewan they had practically all the mules in Canada-9073 mules-but there are practically none in the other provinces. I am only dealing with agricultural statistics, and we are talking about quadrupeds now.

In closing, Mr. Speaker, I would like to make special mention of the hon. members representing constituencies in the province of Quebec. I speak truly and to the best of my knowledge that twenty or thirty of the hon. members representing constituencies in the province of Quebec are not really representing the spirit of the people of Quebec, having re- ' ference to the politics of the two different parties in this House. I appeal to hon. gentlemen and I say that they do know that the spirit of the province of Quebec is protectionist all the way through. Having reference to the magnificent protectionist policy consistently pursued from beginning to end by their able provincial government, I appeal to hon. members from that province and I say to them, "You have the power to save the situation that now exists in Canada." I appeal to the members from Quebec to consider this matter seriously; on the question of their duty to their country and the loyalty they have always shown to their country, with the permission of the Speaker they might ask the privilege of crossing the floor of the House, on the ground that they want to divorce themselves from the party who do not believe in protection. I would like to see a real page made in history; I would like to see twenty members from Quebec cross the floor on the question of a trade policy which makes for the welfare of the Dominion of Canada. By so doing you guard your industries because under present conditions you never know when your industries are going to be hurt.

Let me say from my seat in the House one word to the people of Canada. I suggest that they should take more interest in the affairs of their country and vote for the adoption of a fiscal policy which means live and let live for all parts of Canada. I should like to ask the people of Canada to consider the recent election and the results of the returns sent in by returning officers, which show that tens of thousands of people in Canada did not vote at all. It is too bad; they should vote. It is almost a question whether we should not have compulsory voting as they have it in Australia. I appeal to the people to send only to this parliament, as indeed they

The Budget-Mr. Letellier

generally do, men who with staunch hearts will follow a policy of Canada first and foremost, Canada as a link in that world chain of nations on which the sun never sets, so as to secure peace, happiness and prosperity to all the people of this world.

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL
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May 6, 1926

Mr. BAKER:

Let me substitute for "three

or four months," if I said it the words, "a lesser portion of the year."

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL
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April 16, 1926

Mr. BAKER:

I have known people to

come to Canada after they have passed their fiftieth year.

Topic:   OLD AGE PENSIONS
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April 16, 1926

Mr. BAKER:

Are we not to pay pensions after five years?

Topic:   OLD AGE PENSIONS
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April 16, 1926

Mr. BAKER:

Clause (c) provides:

(c) has resided in Canada for the twenty years immediately preceding the date aforesaid;

That is, he must have arrived in Canada twenty years before reaching the age of seventy. Is there not danger in that clause to the welfare of Canada? I presume the whole purpose of this legislation is to reward those who have worked for the welfare of Canada. I think we all agree that this is desirable. Unfortunately the working people of Europe by the time they have reached the age of fifty are pretty well broken down. I have seen hundreds of them and know what I am talking about. If they come here at the age of forty-nine years and eleven months, and are not in a physical condition to give any labour to Canada between that age and seventy, they might live to the age of ninety, and although owing them no reward the Dominion would be paying them a pension for that period. That is the only bad point I see.

Topic:   OLD AGE PENSIONS
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