John Gillanders TURRIFF

TURRIFF, The Hon. John Gillanders

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
Assiniboia (Saskatchewan)
Birth Date
December 14, 1855
Deceased Date
November 10, 1930
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Gillanders_Turriff
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=52a4499f-fa60-4960-92e4-bb99baf0c85e&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
farmer, merchant

Parliamentary Career

November 3, 1904 - September 17, 1908
LIB
  Assiniboia East (Northwest Territories)
October 26, 1908 - July 29, 1911
LIB
  Assiniboia (Saskatchewan)
September 21, 1911 - October 6, 1917
LIB
  Assiniboia (Saskatchewan)
December 17, 1917 - September 22, 1918
UNION
  Assiniboia (Saskatchewan)
September 23, 1918 - October 4, 1921
LIB
  Assiniboia (Saskatchewan)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 3 of 396)


May 18, 1918

Mr. TURRIFF:

There is one other .reason why we should not pass this clause as suggested. I agree very largely with the remarks made by my hon. friend from North Oxford (Mr. Nesbitt) that the provision under discussion might probably be further amended to make it more clear. We notice in the Press that sometime in ' the future there will probably be as many as three million American soldiers overseas. Under the proposed amendment the dependent relatives of such men who come to Canada, may be paid out of the Patriotic Fund. As is well known, people are crossing from the United States into Canada by the tens of thousands every year, even at the present time. Why should we direct payments to be made from the Canadian Patriotic Fund to the relatives of American . soldiers who are overseas fighting the battles of that country as well as our own? They are our allies, it is true, and we are glad to have them and see them in the battle line, but the United States is just as well able to take care of the wives and children of its soldiers, as we are to take care of the wives and children of our own soldiers, and even better.

Topic:   CANADIAN PATRIOTIC FUND ACT AMENDMENT.
Full View Permalink

May 13, 1918

Mr. TURRIFF:

Those who have been in Ottawa for years and know something about the Civil Service realize that members of the Civil Service themselves have far more influence in the matter of appointments than all the members of the Senate and the House of Commons put together. The amendment is not designed to prevent any class of persons from entering the Service.

I would not for a moment suggest that a man should be debarred because he has two or three sons or daughters in the Service, but there is no reason why the information referred to in the amendment should not be given to the House and the country. That is why I support the amendment.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   AND TO BRING THE OUTSIDE SERVICE UNDER ITS PROVISIONS.
Full View Permalink

May 13, 1918

Mr. TURRIFF:

Thousands of men have gone from Canada, have used the uniform to enable them to keep from getting within sound of the guns, have remained in England and through political influence have secured high positions there. If this amendment is passed as it is worded, these men, when they return, will be able to use the same political influence that kept their skins safe when they were in England in order to get high positions here in the Service without passing an examination. I object most strongly to that. If my hon. friend will make his amendment apply only to men 'who' have gone across the channel and fought in the trenches, I will support it, hut I protest against these political soldiers, who took good care not to get in line with the bullets, being given any special advantage over anybody else when they come home.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   AND TO BRING THE OUTSIDE SERVICE UNDER ITS PROVISIONS.
Full View Permalink

May 13, 1918

Mr. TURRIFF:

I think subsection 1 should be amended to provide that all civil servants appointed in the future should not have the privilege of voting. The Civil Service should not have the vote, but I should not like to take the vote away from any of those who *were appointed in the past when that was the law of the country. But if we now amend the Act to provide that any civil servant appointed in the future should not have the vote, then no one would have anything to complain of . because, if a person wishes to retain the vote, he need not take a position under the Government. It would be much better for the Service and for the country if the Civil Service did not have the franchise. We now propose to bring the Outside Service under this Act, and the Government is taking over a big mileage of railways and we shall have thousands and tens of thousands of officials under the Government, so that the question of this vote may be a serious one. It has been found better in the Old Country that civil servants should not vote. Very few of them now vote, and there is no doubt, if civil servants did not have the vote, we would have a better service, and there would be less politics in the Service and fewer dismissals of officials when there is a change of Government. I should like to see that subsection changed.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   AND TO BRING THE OUTSIDE SERVICE UNDER ITS PROVISIONS.
Full View Permalink

May 13, 1918

Mr. TURRIFF:

I think the minister's idea of waiting for the report of the Speaker of the House is a very good one. I have not the slightest intention of interfering with the official stenographers during recess; they work here, I understand, by the day during the session. Under this clause as it stands, the permanent officers of the Senate and of the Commons and of the Library of Parliament, drawing from $2,000 to $5,000 a year in salaries, can, this year, for a ten months' interval, go out and compete with others who have not a big Government salary at their back. I do not know that they do that; I have never heard of their doing that; and I do not think it is likely. At the same time, it is quite possible for them to do so under this clause, and I think iit should be amended in that respect. It is .all right now, -when labour is scarce, and when several departments are looking for workers all the time, for these officials to do extra work. But, ordinarily, it is not fair to the outside public to have an official drawing a big salary from the Government go out and compete with ordinary labour during one-half of the year.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   AND TO BRING THE OUTSIDE SERVICE UNDER ITS PROVISIONS.
Full View Permalink