Thomas CHISHOLM

CHISHOLM, Thomas, M.D., C.M.

Personal Data

Party
Conservative (1867-1942)
Constituency
Huron East (Ontario)
Birth Date
April 12, 1842
Deceased Date
October 1, 1931
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Chisholm
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=501d2f98-6e1c-4710-8d9c-177e33d38756&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
author, lecturer, physician, teacher

Parliamentary Career

November 3, 1904 - September 17, 1908
CON
  Huron East (Ontario)
October 26, 1908 - July 29, 1911
CON
  Huron East (Ontario)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 2 of 15)


April 5, 1910

Mr. T. CHISHOLM.

What is right and honourable, and just should be law. Now, the government appoint Inspectors to inspect meat. They do that for the benefit of the general public. The government, representing the general public, pay these inspectors, and it is through them that the general public receive the benefit. Those who receive the benefit should pay the cost. The government, in appointing inspectors, have gone a certain distance. Any one who employs another person to do work for him, whether the government or an individual, is responsible for what that servant may do under their instructions. When an animal is condemned, there may be considerable difficulty in knowing to whom it belonged in the first place. It is utterly im-IKissible that one hog among 400 or 500 can be traced to the farmer from whom it was purchased. Even if that could be done, a farmer who had any suspicion that the animal was diseased, would not offer it for sale to a drover who would be likely to take it to a point where it would be inspected. The result is that diseased animals are retained on the farm. In that way the present practice really results in propagating disease, because the animal thus retained by the farmer is sold to the local butcher, and by the local butcher to the people of the neighbourhood. Thus meat for export is being inspected while the meat being sold to our Canadian citizens is not being inspected.

Topic:   COMMON.'
Full View Permalink

March 22, 1910

Mr. T. CHISHOLM.

I wish to suggest that there is a certain kind of literature which the department might use with great advantage much more than it does. 1 hold in my hand a book which I believe has been got up under the direction of the Minister of Agriculture. A coov of this book should be put into the hands of every booking agent -on the other side of the ocean. Complaint has been made that certain parts of Canada have not been properly looked after in seeking for immigrants. Here is a book which gives full information in regard to the resources and productions of every province. With regard to British Columbia, it gives all particulars about minerals, the fisheries and the lumber of the province. The book is published in German, French and English. I have Tead it in the three languages, and I must say that if it had a greatei circulation, it would do a great deal oi good. Such a book is not thrown into the waste basket, but it is put into a library where it can be taken down anv time. If 200,000 copies of this book were sent abroad, I believe they would do a great deal more good than some of our agents. I have recommended it a great many times, and a great many copies have been sent

through my influence to countries where it can be read. I think this -book is much better than the atlas to which the minister has referred. Another thing 1 must say for it is that it is thoroughly accurate. It gives full particulars about our homestead regulations and about every part of Canada. I hope it will be put into much more extensive -circulation than it has been in the past.

Topic:   IMMIGRATION ACT AMENDMENT.
Full View Permalink

March 22, 1910

Mr. THOS. CHISHOLM.

I think the minister might try the experiment of putting a medical officer on one or two of those boats next summer, and let him report, not only in regard to the physicai condition of these immigrants, but also obtain some idea of their object in coming over, Whether they intend to become farmers, or farm labourers, or what they intend to do. I think the same medical officer who inspects them in regard to health could also ascertain a great manv things about them in other respects, and make a report to the government that would be useful. I am satisfied it is impossible to make a proper examination of patients coming off the boats as they do at the present time, any medical man understands that. Take a case Where the physician examines a man in the morning for tuberculosis, he examines him with a thermometer and perhaps finds the temperature normal, while in the evening that same patient might have a temperature of 102. I understand that the way the immigrants are examined is simply by looking at them. That certainly is not satisfactory, because it is quality and not quan-Mr. OLIVER.

tity that we are looking for. I think the minister has improved the conditions a great deal, and I am sure he would like to improve them still further, but not being a medical man, he does not understand the difficulties. I am sure we are allowing in a great many diseased persons from abroad that could be kept out if we had an officer on board the vessel coming over. I agree that he should be responsible to this government. More than that,- his report should be published in a blue-book so that members of parliament could read it. But it is utterly impossible properly to examine immigrants in the short time allowed the inspector.

I have spent myself a whole day, from daylight to dark, examining eight or ten or fifteen patients, and been very busy. But here we find an officer putting through perhaps 500 persons in the same time. The thing is utterly absurd. I think the minister should try the experiment of putting a medical officer on one or two of those boats, it would not cost a great deal. I am sure if he did so the result would be so satisfactory that, notwithstanding the extra cost, he_ would continue the practice, and would also insist in getting other information about these immigrants. The physician could ascertain in regard to their moral standing by keeping his eyes and ears open, and he could learn a great deal about them which would enable him to judge whether they should be allowed in or not. I think he could be very busv the whole four or five days during the passage in examining the incoming immigrants.

Topic:   IMMIGRATION ACT AMENDMENT.
Full View Permalink

March 21, 1910

Mr. T. CHISHOLM.

If this section be amended by making it refer to assistance by a charitable organization, should it not be made clear that it applies to charitable organizations in Canada?

Topic:   IMMIGRATION ACT AMENDMENT.
Full View Permalink

March 18, 1910

Mr. T. CHISHOLM.

Injustice is often done to inland constituencies in our part of Ontario. A great deal of money is spent by the Dominion for harbour improvements to the benefit of certain ridings, while inland ridings get nothing at all. I have been many years in this House, and have asked for several things, and have failed to get any grant that I ever asked for. East Huron is as good a riding as there is in Canada, and an experimental farm there would yield as good results as in any other place I know of. A great many hundreds of millions of dollars have been voted away since I oame into this House. I have asked once or twice for little things that I wished to have done for East Huron, but no request that I have ever made has been granted. Now I would ask for an experimental fruit farm in East Huron. Because of the peculiar position we occupy-elevation, the proximity of the lake, and the nature of the soil- we have, I believe, the finest apple-growing section in Canada. 1 have heard others claim something of that kind for their localities, but, for a particular kind of apple, the Northern Spy, I think we have the best condition to be found in the country. The Northern Spy ripens in East Huron exactly at the season when nature provides it with all the benefits which in other localities have to be procured by means of artificial cold storage. The farmers there, however, do not know what to do. They do not understand spraying their orchards or how to get rid of the codling moth, and other pests. I am sure that if a small experimental fruit farm were established there-if it were only a farm of ten or fifteen acres-and handled properly, it would mean a great deal to the people of that part of the country. I know that the Minister of Agriculture (Mr. Fisher) would like to do what is fair and right, and I would ask him to remember that an inland riding like mine, that has been paying and paying for years, ought Mr. BURRELL.

as a matter of the barest justice, to get something. I would ask the minister to kindly remember that there is an old man up in' East Huron, and that he would like to get something for East Huron before he dies.

Topic:   SUPPLY.
Full View Permalink