Jean MARCHAND

MARCHAND, The Hon. Jean, P.C., C.C.

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
Langelier (Quebec)
Birth Date
December 20, 1918
Deceased Date
August 28, 1988
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jean_Marchand
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=4ff4a33a-f82d-47c1-90cc-10cd8c78bb05&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
unionist

Parliamentary Career

November 8, 1965 - April 23, 1968
LIB
  Quebec West (Quebec)
  • Minister of Citizenship and Immigration (December 18, 1965 - September 30, 1966)
  • Minister of Manpower and Immigration (October 1, 1966 - April 19, 1968)
  • Minister of Manpower and Immigration (April 20, 1968 - July 5, 1968)
  • Secretary of State of Canada (April 20, 1968 - July 5, 1968)
June 25, 1968 - September 1, 1972
LIB
  Langelier (Quebec)
  • Minister of Manpower and Immigration (April 20, 1968 - July 5, 1968)
  • Secretary of State of Canada (April 20, 1968 - July 5, 1968)
  • Minister of Forestry and Rural Development (July 6, 1968 - March 31, 1969)
  • Minister of Regional Economic Expansion (April 1, 1969 - November 26, 1972)
October 30, 1972 - May 9, 1974
LIB
  Langelier (Quebec)
  • Minister of Regional Economic Expansion (April 1, 1969 - November 26, 1972)
  • Minister of Transport (November 27, 1972 - September 25, 1975)
July 8, 1974 - March 26, 1979
LIB
  Langelier (Quebec)
  • Minister of Transport (November 27, 1972 - September 25, 1975)
  • Minister Without Portfolio (September 26, 1975 - January 21, 1976)
  • Minister of the Environment (January 22, 1976 - June 30, 1976)
December 9, 1976 - March 26, 1979
LIB
  Langelier (Quebec)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 1 of 984)


September 26, 1983

Mr. Marchand:

After watching you on television this morning, after reading an interview which you gave to a Toronto

newspaper, and after listening to your words this afternoon, I understand why your are Prime Minister of Great Britain.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   APPENDIX
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September 26, 1983

Mr. Marchand:

If I were a woman sitting in this Parliament, I would be very optimistic about my future because you know how closely we follow the British tradition.

Thank you for coming to our country and our Parliament. Thank you for your enlightening address and the wisdom and warmth contained therein. I am confident that your words will not quickly fade from the minds of all here assembled. I hope that others during your continuing visit will have even a brief opportunity to share our appreciation of your experience and the depth of your personality.

We have not forgotten that Great Britain is the world power that made it possible for us to achieve autonomy and subsequently full independence without bloodshed and without suffering the aftermath of forced or violent secession.

Some people believe that the latest step taken has isolated us once and for all from your great country. They are wrong. The heritage we have received from your country, and I am thinking of the parliamentary and legal system, and our social and even our cultural heritage, is among the values we cherish most and which are an integral part of our national fabric.

Few nations can wear the mantle of mother country as comfortably as yours. It has nurtured this nation through more than two centuries of infancy, often painful adolescence and maturity. If Canada has reached adulthood, it is because it has been given its lead by an understanding, not suffocating, parent. Even our minorities will be hard pressed to point to another nation, another system of government, which grants so much freedom to progress, freedom to dissent, and freedom to be unique.

There is no doubt in my mind that there will always be a special relationship between our two countries notwithstanding their distance and their necessary differences.

[ Translation]

On behalf of the Senate of Canada, I wish to thank you, Right Hon. Lady, for accepting the invitation extended by our Prime Minister (Mr. Trudeau), and I hope that you will remember your visit here as one of the high points of your distinguished political career.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   APPENDIX
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September 26, 1983

Hon. Jean Marchand (Speaker of the Senate):

Prime Minister Thatcher, Prime Minister Trudeau, Madam Speaker, when you were first elected Prime Minister of Great Britain, I was very impressed. A mighty, powerful country like Great Britain electing a woman as Prime Minister is something which is quite new. However, I was much more impressed when you were re-elected.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   APPENDIX
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March 11, 1981

Hon. Jean Marchand (The Speaker of the Senate):

Mr. President, Mr. Prime Minister, Madam Speaker of the House of Commons;

To receive you in our capital and our Parliament represents for us, President and Mrs. Reagan, not only a great joy and

March 11, 1981

singular honour, but also the visible assurance that our traditional ties of friendship hold strong despite international upheavals whose shock waves have not spared our own continent, forced as we are to march more and more in step with even the most far-flung regions of an increasingly interdependent world.

On behalf of the Senate of Canada, I would like to transmit our heartfelt gratitude that you have chosen, at this very earliest stage of your mandate, to reinforce the foundation of a unique relationship based not just on a common interest shared by our two peoples, but also on a common spirit and aspiration. While recognizing our differences and respective sovereignty and in full appreciation of our respective stature and resources, we know that we are natural allies and that only blindness, or at least a lack of vision, can threaten this bond.

By seeking common ground in our national viewpoints, we will not only be doing ourselves a mutual service, but also contributing to the betterment of life among our brothers in other nations. If our roles are sometimes different, they are nonetheless complementary and our goals must be the same. To paraphrase an old maxim: "We who imagine we can do without the world deceive ourselves greatly; but those who fancy that the world cannot do without them deceive themselves even more." Long live the United States of America, long live Canada, long live peace between men and between nations.

Thank you, Mr. President.

Some hon. Members; Hear, hear!

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   APPENDIX "A"
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May 26, 1980

Hon. Jean Marchand (President of the Senate):

Mr. President Portillo, Mr. Prime Minister of Canada, Madam Speaker, honourable colleagues of the Senate and of the House of Commons, ladies and gentlemen, in 1973, we had the great honour to welcome in this House your predecessor, Mr. President, who came to convey to us the solemn testimony of the friendship uniting Mexico and Canada. Your presence among us today vouches for the constancy of this faithful friendship. Before acceding to your high functions at the head of the State, you had foreshadowed in your writings and teachings what has been your government's program for three years now. You summarized it in two short and strong phrases which call for the reinforcement of the structures of freedom and justice and the enrichment of the values which are fundamental to national coexistence. We are also of the opinion that in the life of every nation, there must exist a dynamic relationship between the institutions with which a country endows itself and the values and aspirations they represent.

Mr. President, your visit takes place at a milestone of our history where that balance must be achieved anew. Please rest assured that Canadians will be up to that perpetual challenge as they have always been.

Mr. President, you called our attention to the urgency of searching also for the right equation in the international economic arena. We will ponder your views and the remarks by the Prime Minister about the growing and necessary interdependence between the economies of the world. Canadians have always been concerned about basic human needs. They are becoming more aware that the problem is complex, that there is no easy solution and that a wide range of interlocking issues will have to be tackled with patience and determination by all parties concerned.

Excelentisimo Senor Primer Ministro,

Honorables Miembros del Parlamento:

Iniciamos el penultimo decenio del siglo XX bajo graves amenazas de guerra internacionales. A1 desorden economico de los ultimos anos se agrega una generalizada y aguda crisis de confianza en todos los ordenes. Esta dificil coyuntura ha vulnerado, incluso, principios esenciales de la convivencia entre hombres y naciones.

No deseamos disimular las heridas y cicatrices del mundo en que vivimos sino transformarlo. Disponemos de poco tiempo para hacerlo, pero no podemos renunciar al compromiso de abrir los caminos por donde transitaran las nuevas fuerzas de la vida.

Hago votos por el futuro y por la fraternidad de Canada y de Mexico.

S.E. Jean Marchand (Presidente del Senado): Senor Presi-dente Lopez Portillo, senor Primer Ministro de Canada, Senora Presidenta de la Camara de los Comunes, honorables colegas del Senado y de la Camara de los Comunes, Senoras y Senores: En 1973 tuvimos el gran honor de acoger en este recinto al predecesor del Senor Presidente que nos aportaba el testimonio solemne de la amistad mexico-canadiense. Vuestra presencia entre nosotros hoy es una prueba de la constancia de esta fiel amistad. Antes de alcanzar las funciones mas altas del Estado ha anunciado usted en sus escritos y en su ensenanza lo que ha sido desde hace tres anos su programa de gobierno. Este programa lo ha resumido usted politicamente en dos formulas resueltas y concisas: robustecer las estructuras de la libertad y de la justicia y enriquecer los valores esenciales de la coexistencia nacional. Nosotros tambien pensamos que en la vida de cada pueblo debe existir una relation dinamica entre las instituciones con que un pais se ha dotado y los valores y aspiraciones que encarnan.

Su visita, senor Presidente, tiene lugar en un momento decisivo de nuestra historia donde se debe alcanzar nueva-mente dicho equilibrio. Tenga usted la seguridad que los canadienses sabran mostrarse, como siempre, a la altura de ese reto constante.

Senor Presidente: usted nos senalo asimismo que urgia tratar de establecer cierto equilibrio en el panorama economico internacional. Vamos a reflexionar sobre sus observacio-nes y las que hiciera el Primer Ministro (Sr. Trudeau) relati-vas a la creciente y necesaria interdependencia entre las diversas economias del mundo. Los canadienses siempre se han preocupado de las necesidades fundamentales de la humani-dad. Cada dia se dan mas cuenta de la complejidad del problema, que la solution no es facil y que todas las partes interesadas deben analizar paciente y resueltamente toda una gama de cuestiones estrechamente entrelazadas.

May 26, 1980

We thank you, Sir, for your visit and we hope that your talks with Canadian ministers will lead to a further strengthening of ties between our two countries to their mutual benefit.

Your Excellency, please accept our most heart-felt gratitude and offer our best wishes to your magnificient country.

Topic:   HOUSE OF COMMONS CHAMBER, OTTAWA
Subtopic:   DISCURSO PRONUNCIADO POR EL C. JOSE LOPEZ PORTILLO, ESTADOS UNIDOS MEXICANOS, ANTE EL PARLAMENTO DE CANADA
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