Edward Armour PECK

PECK, Edward Armour, K.C.

Personal Data

Party
Conservative (1867-1942)
Constituency
Peterborough West (Ontario)
Birth Date
September 11, 1858
Deceased Date
July 18, 1947
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_Armour_Peck
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=4f67ea43-a53e-4c7f-865e-f93d2df80a0d&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
barrister

Parliamentary Career

October 29, 1925 - July 2, 1926
CON
  Peterborough West (Ontario)
September 14, 1926 - May 30, 1930
CON
  Peterborough West (Ontario)
July 28, 1930 - August 14, 1935
CON
  Peterborough West (Ontario)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 18 of 19)


March 9, 1927

1. Has the government received any requests to amend the Pension Act so as to enable the granting of pensions to soldiers who, when on active service, contracted venereal disease and as a result, partly or wholly, are under disability?

2. Will the government take steps to amend the act so as to permit issue of pensions in such cases?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   PENSION TO SOLDIERS
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March 3, 1927

Mr. PECK:

I fully agree with the

principle of this measure. The old people of this country who are unable to earn a living for themselves are entitled to full consideration from the people of this Dominion. The same principle applies, of course, to all people who are helpless and unable to make a living for themselves. We apply this principle in giving assistance to widows and children, and in the Workmen's Compensation Act, and particularly should we consider the old people who have served their country in one way and another and are now unable to support themselves. I am glad, therefore, to find that the House is so largely in accord with the principle of this bill.

I regret that the government should not have seen fit to contribute a larger sum than fifty per cent towards the operation of this measure. I am not prepared to quarrel with the view that perhaps it would be better to leave the administration of this scheme to the provinces, because that might lend itself to economy and greater care in the distribution of the money, and on that account perhaps some contribution sjiould be made by the provinces; but for this parliament to offer to contribute only fifty per cent seems to me unreasonable. It would certainly not be sufficient to ensure that the provinces would adopt the necessary legislation to give effect to this principle we all accept. I fully agree with the hon. member for North Winnipeg (Mr. Heaps) that the federal government should contribute at least seventy-five per cent towards the cost of these pensions. I for one am not satisfied to see the bill go through in its present form, but if the House sees fit to pass it in its present form, I shall accept it, because I accept the principle. I would like to see the House left free to determine

whether or not we should contribute at least seventy-five per cent, and I think before this bill finally passes a resolution should be introduced dividing the House on that question, with a view to making the measure acceptable to the provinces. If the provinces cannot be persuaded to accept the contributions provided for here, and I do not think they can, the act is going to remain a dead letter, and the poor people of this country, of whom there are many in my constituency looking for relief in this direction, are going to be bitterly disappointed. I therefore trust that the government will see its way clear to increasing the amount substantially in order that the measure may become operative in all the provinces.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   OLD AGE PENSIONS
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February 8, 1927

Mr. PECK:

In Peterborough and the

neighbouring district there is a strong feeling that the canal should be completed. The canal itself connects the Georgian bay with lake Ontario. Although the canal is in all two hundred and forty miles in length the amount required for actual canal purposes is about thirty miles. It has been constructed from lake Ontario to lake Simcoe, to the Severn river, and all that is necessary now to give complete communication is to construct a small section on the Severn river. I think there are two rapids. When that portion is completed, there will be a complete passageway for boats of six or seven feet draught from the Georgian bay to lake Ontario. There

is a certain amount of power to be generated still on the canal, and it is not, it seems to me, fitting, after so much money has been spent upon the canal, that this remaining section should not be completed. As I say, the people in my district are very much impressed with the importance of the work, and arrangements are -being made for deputations to Ottawa to wait upon the government, and urge the completion of the work. I trust what has been said by the Minister of Railways and Canals will not prejudice their application.

Topic:   EIIITION
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February 23, 1926

Mr. PECK:

I do not remember making

any comparison between the United States and Canada. I recognize the fact that the United States by reason of their keeping out af the war so long are in a much better position financially than Canada. We must try to overcome that, but we cannot do so by continuing to buy United States or European goods manufactured by cheap labour. The increase in the value of manufactured goods coming into this country was shown in a recent article in the Financial Post. That article pointed out that although Canada was apparently improving in some respects, the quantity of manufactured goods, imported goods, which we could well make in this country, was increasing. If we could arrange to

manufacture in Canada the goods which we require for use by our people, this trouble about lack of employment and all the troubles incident thereto would be avoided.

Topic:   GOVERNOR GENERAL'S SPEECH
Subtopic:   ADDRESS IN REPLY
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February 23, 1926

Mr. PECK:

He must be elected, of course. I presume if he is not elected in the constituency which has been set aside for him by Mr. Darke, he will keep on until he finds some place in which he can take shelter. Wc all know his views, because he came to Ontario during the last election and gave expression to them. He has the satisfaction of knowing that wherever he spoke a Conservative candidate was elected. He expressed the view that there should be a reduction in the tariff and a similar idea was given expression to by the Hon. Vincent Massey-a great friend of the Prime Minister-who, it is suggested, is also going to endeavour to obtain a seat in this House. There is fhus the element of uncertainty and there will be continued uncertainty until /this policy of protection is fully adopted by the House and steps are taken to put the tariff on a sound footing.

Then this portion of the Speech concludes:

A tariff advisory board will accordingly be appointed forthwith. This board will be expected to make a careful study of the customs tariff, the revenue to be derived therefrom and the effect of the tariff and allied factors on industry and agriculture.

That, if the expression is not unparliamentary, is simply passing the buck. The matter is to be referred to a commission and everything will consequently be postponed for another year, or possibly longer. I do not think it is the wish of the people that action upon this tariff question should be postponed;

The Address-Mr. Peck

I believe the people want the adjustment of the tariff to be taken up and dealt with immediately. I do not see any reason why a special tariff commission should be appointed. There are in this House members who are capable of serving on committees and making their own investigations, and I have very strong objection to the appointment of a commission by any party if that can possibly be avoided. Hon. members who are here representing the people are an intelligent set of men, and I am quite sure a committee could be selected from members on all sides of this House who would give this matter fair and impartial consideration and within a reasonable time recommend such changes in the tariff as would give effect to the wishes of the people.

In the Speech from the Throne there are many other matters with which I might deal, but I do not wish to do so now because I do not want to get away from the question of protection; for it is important that that matter should be considered in the interest of the people. I have therefore risen to-night to express in a general way my views in this regard and1 my hope that a matter of such importance to many people in this country will not 'be side-tracked even for measures of interest and value to the Progressive party.

Topic:   GOVERNOR GENERAL'S SPEECH
Subtopic:   ADDRESS IN REPLY
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