Robert James MANION

MANION, The Hon. Robert James, P.C., M.D., C.M.

Personal Data

Party
Conservative (1867-1942)
Constituency
London (Ontario)
Birth Date
November 19, 1881
Deceased Date
July 2, 1943
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_James_Manion
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=4f144b8d-0f62-4502-b6eb-6bf2aa0faaad&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
physician

Parliamentary Career

December 17, 1917 - October 4, 1921
UNION
  Fort William and Rainy River (Ontario)
  • Minister of Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment (September 22, 1921 - December 28, 1921)
December 6, 1921 - September 5, 1925
CON
  Fort William and Rainy River (Ontario)
  • Minister of Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment (September 22, 1921 - December 28, 1921)
October 29, 1925 - July 2, 1926
CON
  Fort William (Ontario)
  • Postmaster General (June 29, 1926 - July 12, 1926)
  • Minister presiding over the Department of Health (June 29, 1926 - July 12, 1926)
  • Minister of Immigration and Colonization (June 29, 1926 - July 12, 1926)
  • Minister of Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment (June 29, 1926 - July 12, 1926)
  • Minister of Labour (June 29, 1926 - July 12, 1926)
September 14, 1926 - May 30, 1930
CON
  Fort William (Ontario)
  • Postmaster General (July 13, 1926 - September 24, 1926)
July 28, 1930 - August 14, 1935
CON
  Fort William (Ontario)
  • Minister of Railways and Canals (August 7, 1930 - October 22, 1935)
August 25, 1930 - August 14, 1935
CON
  Fort William (Ontario)
  • Minister of Railways and Canals (August 7, 1930 - October 22, 1935)
November 14, 1938 - January 25, 1940
CON
  London (Ontario)
  • Leader of the Official Opposition (July 7, 1938 - May 13, 1940)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 1 of 2006)


February 20, 1953

Mr. Manion:

My right hon. friend has read a complete list?

Topic:   EMERGENCY POWERS ACT
Subtopic:   PROVISION FOR CONTINUATION OF ACT FROM MAY
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February 20, 1953

Mr. Manion:

The ones my right hon. friend has read?

Topic:   EMERGENCY POWERS ACT
Subtopic:   PROVISION FOR CONTINUATION OF ACT FROM MAY
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February 20, 1953

Mr. Manion:

Am I right in understanding that this is a complete list of the emergency orders in council?

Topic:   EMERGENCY POWERS ACT
Subtopic:   PROVISION FOR CONTINUATION OF ACT FROM MAY
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November 21, 1949

Mr. Manion:

I rise to a point of order. I do

not think the Prime Minister has any right to use the word "untrue" in regard to a statement made by any member of this house.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   EXTENSION OF TIME FOR CONSIDERATION OF PRIVATE BILLS
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January 25, 1940

Mr. MANION:

I certainly wish to speak.

In the first place, Mr. Speaker, I should like it distinctly pointed out that there is no particular courtesy in permitting me to speak, any more than there was courtesy in permitting the Prime Minister to speak on a motion which is not debatable. I should like that distinctly understood. I should like to point out also that the custom in the parliament of Canada has always been for the government to give a copy of the speech from the throne to the leader of the opposition an hour or so in advance, and up to the present session that has alwaj's been done by this government. No such courtesy was extended to-day, not even up to the time when you, Mr. Speaker, had the copy of the speech in your hands. So far as I know, no copy has been in the hands of anyone in this house except the Prime Minister and the Speaker. I merely point this out, sir, because it is a discourtesy which not only offends all the parliamentary traditions of this and the British house, but also shows an unfair decision on the part of the Prime Minister to try to catch everyone in this house without preparation, by the unprecedented step he has taken to-day. Until I went into the senate chamber I had absolutely no

hint that there was any thought of anything like this. The Prime Minister called the parliament of Canada together to-day in the usual way. He brought members here from the four corners of Canada apparently, so far as one can judge-we do not yet know the intention-to dissolve the house to-night. That is what I understand; that is the only conclusion I can draw, although in one part of his speech the right hon. gentleman said we understood what was in his mind. Well, I doubt if when he spoke last session he thoroughly understood what was in his mind, because usually when the right hon. gentleman speaks as he did at that time he leaves himself an opportunity to back out one of the rear doors or slip out a window. That was what he did then.

The only reason why I mention this particularly, sir, is that it is so unprecedented to treat an opposition in this manner. Not only does the right hon. gentleman suggest, in the speech from the throne at a supposedly regular session of parliament, that he is going to have an immediate election, but he prepares a political speech to be delivered here this afternoon and gives no one else any opportunity of preparing any remarks in advance. As the Prime Minister was speaking I had to sit here and try to outline a few points I desired to make as a result of this unprecedented act. For that reason, Mr. Speaker, I ask you and hon. members of the house to bear with me if my remarks are rather disjointed.

It would have been so easy, once the right hon. gentleman and his government decided on a step like this, to follow the usual courteous practice of a prime minister and a government. However, I must say this is not the first time that the right hon. gentleman has shown this type of discourtesy towards me since I became leader of the opposition. I regret that very much, because many times in the past I have said that whatever faults the right hon. gentleman might have-and I suppose I have pointed out his faults as often as anyone-that was one fault he did not have; he was usually courteous in social life and elsewhere. But he has not shown any of that courtesy in this instance. What he ha-done from a political point of view is to carry on what I consider unscrupulous politics at this time, by calling for an immediate election without any hint to the people, in order to gag discussion in this house and throughout the country-at all events any prepared discussion-and to attempt to get a snap decision of the people of Canada on this great question.

Topic:   DISSOLUTION OF PARLIAMENT
Subtopic:   STATEMENT OF THE PRIME MINISTER AS TO PROPOSED GENERAL ELECTION
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