Donald MACLENNAN

MACLENNAN, The Hon. Donald, Q.C., LL.B.

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
Inverness--Richmond (Nova Scotia)
Birth Date
March 2, 1877
Deceased Date
October 19, 1953
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Donald_MacLennan
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=4d3cba0c-1c67-4806-b1e4-bf231bb9da40&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
barrister

Parliamentary Career

October 14, 1935 - January 25, 1940
LIB
  Inverness--Richmond (Nova Scotia)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 5 of 5)


June 3, 1936

Mr. MacLENNAN:

Who is to decide as to their physical and mental fitness?

Topic:   JUDGES ACT AMENDMENT
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May 20, 1936

Mr. MacLENNAN:

Will the employees

of the national harbours board have the benefits of the compensation laws?

Topic:   NATIONAL HARBOURS BOARD
Subtopic:   PROVISION FOR ADMINISTRATION AND CONTROL OF PUBLIC HARBOURS
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May 18, 1936

Mr. MacLENNAN:

I know cases in Sydney, Nova Scotia, where the dealer sent in an order to the manufacturers for a certain number of cars, and at that time the sales tax was six per cent. After he signed the order he went out on the highways and byways of Nova Scotia to sell those cars, by description, of course, naming a certain price. He sold them, but before they actually arrived in Sydney there was an increase in the sales tax. It is an easy matter for -a dealer who has not sold a car to add the two per cent tax, but many cars have been sold at a fixed price and delivered after the sales tax was increased, and as it is now if the dealer does not pay that extra two per cent he cannot make a sale. I think some arrangement should be made for compensating the dealer. I know the difficulties of the minister, but at the same time it is' very hard on some of the dealers in Sydney. They have taken orders for cars and made their bargains in the spring. I was told that one dealer in Sydney would go to the wall in consequence. Possibly that is an exaggeration, but at all events it does work a hardship, and I hope the minister will see his way clear to making some arrangement to avoid it.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   SPECIAL WAR REVENUE ACT AMENDMENT
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May 8, 1936

Mr. MacLENNAN:

In regard to the nice words spoken by the leader of the opposition of the Minister of Public Works, I read in the paper yesterday that the leader of the opposition was the most distinguished looking man in the house. I must say that this is the first time I have seen him smile continuously for a minute or two, but seeing him smile it seems to me that he is not only the most distinguished but the most handsome man.

It is a serious matter for a member of parliament to say that to his personal knowledge an officer has been guilty of political partisanship. My constituency is over three hundred miles long. I know that some of the office holders there were active in politics;

I am sure of it, but I cannot say it of my own personal knowledge. While I do not wish to say anything here to discredit my predecessor, I may tell the committee that on one sheet of paper he placed the names of twenty-seven office holders who, he declared, were guilty of political partisanship, and they were beheaded forthwith. I do not want to follow that up at all, but the party on my immediate left really ought to practise what they now preach. I am not a bit averse to the Minister of Public Works starting now to scrutinize very carefully the representations of members of parliament who say that they know of their personal knowledge that dozens and dozens of office holders are active partisans. I assure him and this committee that when I say that an office holder has been active in politics when he should not be, I shall be very sure of my ground and I shall not submit any names to him except those that I am sure of from personal knowledge.

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OP PUBLIC WORKS
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May 4, 1936

Mr. MacLENNAN:

In many of the towns there is a great number of young single men, now out of employment who were employed by the railways some years ago. They were laid off and they have been waiting year after year for brighter times in the hope of being reemployed on the railways. I understand that in Nova Scotia at a certain point, the terminal at Point Tupper, there are many unemployed men who worked on the railways in years gone by, and under this scheme it is the intention to send men from God knows where, from the relief camps, to work at this point, while these men who have been" waiting for years with their mouths open will get no employment at all. I do not desire to criticize any scheme which the government is strenuously putting forward to alleviate the unemployment situation, but I really do not think it is fair that men who are now out of employment should be handicapped because they refused to become a public charge, to go into the camps or to take relief. It seems to me to -be rather unfair that because of this refusal, because of their independence and possibly because of a little pride-and I wish there were a little more pride left in many people-these men are now to be penalized. They did not choose to go into detention camps, though if they had gone there they would now be eligible for employment, whereas under this scheme it would appear that they are to be penalized for not having become a public charge.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   INTERIM SUPPLY
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