Jean-Paul Stephen ST-LAURENT

ST-LAURENT, Jean-Paul Stephen, LL.L.

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
Témiscouata (Quebec)
Birth Date
April 23, 1912
Deceased Date
December 22, 1986
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jean-Paul_St._Laurent
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=4d1dfca2-1ef4-4181-9010-e9bada95bbda&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
lawyer

Parliamentary Career

September 26, 1955 - April 12, 1957
LIB
  Témiscouata (Quebec)
June 10, 1957 - February 1, 1958
LIB
  Témiscouata (Quebec)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 63 of 63)


January 31, 1949

Mr. Si. Laurent:

That is not the way in

which we on this side of the house have regarded the problem; and I do not think that hon. gentlemen sitting around my hon. friend have regarded what was done in those last days as being effective. The opinion that has been gradually mellowing in the minds of the electors is the thing that counts, and not the speeches that are made over the radio in the last few days that precede polling.

Today the leader of the Progressive Conservative party wants changes. He says that over the years substantial changes have taken place and that something should be done to give effect to those changes. The position

taken, however, by the premier of Quebec is that he does not want any change, that he will not have any change made, and that he is there to see that no change is made. The change that the hon. gentleman wants at this time is a change to enlarge provincial autonomy and independence and to prevent the usurpation of power by the central authority. The hon. gentleman perhaps gave an indication that his conscience was troubling him a little bit in taking that stand, because he was at pains to say, as reported at page 54 of Hansard:

So that it may not be suggested that I am merely making this statement here in the House of Commons and expressing a different opinion to that which I have held at any other time, may I quote from a statement I made in the Ontario house which is recorded in the Ontario Hansard of April 1, 1947.

That is the one to which I have referred. I do not know whether there is any reason why there should be any anxiety on the part of my hon. friend in that regard. Of course, he is here the leader of the opposition; and we on this side of the house seem to have too much power to suit him. But what was the situation when he was the leader of the opposition in the other house?

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January 31, 1949

Mr. SI. Laurent:

And when one sees by the newspapers that former members of the Bloc Populaire are speaking for my hon. friend's candidate in Nicolet-Yamaska, one wonders. One wonders whether-

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January 31, 1949

Mr. Si. Laurent:

I have here the latest figures available, those of December 31, 1948, which show that the unmatured funded debt on that date was $15,926 million, a drop of something over $950 million since December 31, 1945; and that the United States currency and gold reserves have increased from a low of $461 million to a figure of $998 million on December 31, 1948. I believe most of us in the Cai.adian nation are happy that there has been this improvement in the nation's financial position of something of the order of a billion and a half dollars in that three-year period.

There is no doubt that the whole Canadian economy is very buoyant at the present time and I think there are many who feel that it is prudent during this period of buoyancy to make provision as Joseph did for the time when there may not be the same buoyancy. Some of us do not forget the fable of de La Fontaine in these words:

La cigale, ayant chante tout l'4te,

Se trouva fort depourvue Quand la blse fut venue.

I have a translation of that here as follows: A grasshopper gay Sang the summer away,

And found herself poor With the winter's first roar.

I think the conduct of the ant might be preferable in some ways. There should not be too great a disregard of what prudence has shown to be wise throughout the centuries of experience. Most of the newspapers favourable to my hon. friend have interpreted a paragraph in the speech from the throne as forecasting some reduction in taxation. They are entitled to whatever enjoyment they can get out of that interpretation, but of course they are going to have to keep on guessing

until the budget is brought down, when they will see just what the situation will be. I can assure them that the budget is not going to be delayed. Just as soon as we can get through with the matters which at this session have to be dealt with by a given date, the budget will be ready for submission.

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January 31, 1949

Mr. Si. Laurent:

The Montreal Gazette.

In offering French Canadians, as other Canadians, a progressive conservatism, the party under Mr. George Drew is not offering something new.

I suppose the Gazette ought to know, but we on this side of the house feel that, as time goes on, it is necessary to offer something new and progressive to the people of Canada. We think the time has come when it is advisable to ask the people of Canada to look around and see for themselves what their privileges are; to conceive in their own hearts and minds a greater pride in the privileges which are accorded to them as citizens of this country.

Radio is the first matter mentioned about which there is to be this examination of the activities of the federal government. Canadian radio has proven to be a valuable agency for the furthering and developing-

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