Mark R. MACGUIGAN

MACGUIGAN, The Hon. Mark R., P.C., B.A., M.A., Ph.D., LL.M., J.S.D., LL.D.

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
Windsor--Walkerville (Ontario)
Birth Date
February 17, 1931
Deceased Date
January 12, 1998
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mark_MacGuigan
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=4b34370d-5e62-4479-a0b0-7bd3a601fef1&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
professor of law

Parliamentary Career

June 25, 1968 - September 1, 1972
LIB
  Windsor--Walkerville (Ontario)
October 30, 1972 - May 9, 1974
LIB
  Windsor--Walkerville (Ontario)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Manpower and Immigration (December 22, 1972 - December 21, 1973)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Manpower and Immigration (January 1, 1974 - May 9, 1974)
July 8, 1974 - March 26, 1979
LIB
  Windsor--Walkerville (Ontario)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Labour (September 15, 1974 - September 14, 1975)
May 22, 1979 - December 14, 1979
LIB
  Windsor--Walkerville (Ontario)
February 18, 1980 - July 9, 1984
LIB
  Windsor--Walkerville (Ontario)
  • Secretary of State for External Affairs (March 3, 1980 - September 9, 1982)
  • Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada (September 10, 1982 - June 29, 1984)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 401 of 402)


November 25, 1968

Mr. MacGuigan:

I will be pleased to take any question at the end of my remarks.

Then there is the question with respect to overtime. Overtime in the Windsor operations of the Ford Motor Company is compulsory. Even at a time when there are not enough jobs for those people employed with Ford- 338 have been laid off, and some 600 more will be laid off-the company is able to give extensive overtime to the rest of its workers. This is the reason why I suggest relocation is not the answer. The work is there in Windsor, at the actual plant affected by the layoff. There is work for a great many more men than are presently employed but it is taken up by way of overtime.

This is not of course a question for the government alone; it is a question for all the parties involved. As a matter of fact, Mr. Chairman, that is the final point I would like to make. Matters such as this are not matters for the company alone or for the working force alone. These matters require a tripartite approach, involving the government as the representative of the public, as well as management and labour. We are long past the day when one can speak of management's prerogative to make on short notice fundamental changes which affect, and in some cases greatly impair, the lives of those working for them.

This is not a question which ought to be left to management. It is not a question which ought to be left even to management and the working force. It is a question which concerns the whole public; and I would suggest, Mr. Chairman, that if no solution can be found by way of agreement, if we cannot have co-operative efforts between the three forces involved, then it will very soon be time for us to consider whether or not some solution should be brought forward by legislation. I would hope, although I am not always confident, that the solution would be found by co-operation and negotiation.

I would emphasize the fact that in this age of automation, and even cybernation, the old

ways cannot be allowed to go on unhindered by government. I would commend to the minister the changes I have suggested, and hope that the government will act as a party between management and labour in matters such as this.

[DOT] (8:40 p.m.)

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
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November 25, 1968

Mr. MacGuigan:

Mr. Chairman, I would be in favour of awaiting the Woods report. I do not believe this is a matter which can be considered wholly in isolation from the other problems of labour relations. As a result of my knowledge of what the Woods task force is doing, and my knowledge of the people in this task force, I expect a great deal from the report, and I have reason to believe it will be before the house before many more months have passed. I would think that unless the report is delayed long beyond the time when I would expect it, we should be willing to await it before proceeding on this particular matter.

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
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November 25, 1968

Mr. MacGuigan:

Had I been in the house at the time the Freedman report was presented I think I would have pressed for its speedy implementation, but now when we are within a month or two of the completion of this report, I think we should wait the additional time. Undoubtedly some action must be taken, but the question is how far one should go,

November 25. 1968

and how stringent the legislation should be. I would hope the Woods report would give us some guidance on this.

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
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November 20, 1968

Mr. Mark MacGuigan (Windsor-Walker-ville):

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Manpower and Immigration. In the light of the lay-offs which are scheduled to begin at the Ford Motor Company of Canada in Windsor on Friday, what action is the minister prepared to take to alleviate the serious unemployment which will result?

Topic:   LABOUR CONDITIONS
Subtopic:   WINDSOR-IMPENDING LAY-OFFS AT FORD COMPANY
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November 19, 1968

Mr. MacGuigan:

Mr. Chairman, I rise

merely to say a few words by way of support for the arguments advanced by several hon. members opposite respecting the necessity of the Northumberland causeway to Prince Edward Island. While these hon. members have presented the case for the causeway very well, it might be useful if support from both sides of the house were indicated for this very important project.

I think we all realize that Prince Edward Island is one of the poorest areas of the country, in terms of its possibilities for industrial development. It may be that at some stage in the future oil will be discovered. Companies have searched there before for this valuable product. It may be that great industrial complexes will be built up, but this does not seem within the realm of reasonable expectation. What would seem to be more likely is that advantage could be taken of those resources that are naturally already there, and these resources are principally in the areas of farming, fishing and the tourist industry.

I would like to take the tourist industry as an example of the development problem the Island faces. All those of us who have waited in the long line at either Cape Tormentine or Borden know of the wait of five, six, or seven hours which may occur before ferry space is available to take one across. There is no doubt that this is not only a factor which makes the life of the tourist going to or from Prince Edward Island more difficult, but it is also one which inhibits the tourist trade both by reputation and by experience. On almost any summer day one can sit there in a car and see a number of other cars leaving the line because the people are no longer willing to wait. It has been estimated in a survey conducted by the Stanford Institute that the tourist capacity of P.E.I. could easily be some 3.6 million tourists, and yet at the present time facilities are able to take over only some 400,000 tourists a year. If we were going to have enough ferries to carry the maximum number of tourists across, instead of the four ferries which we have had during recent years in active service, we would have to build 32 ferries at a cost of some $14 million per ferry. According to my calculations this amounts to more than the highest estimate of the cost of the causeway. I present this merely as an example of the potential for development if this valuable transportation link were built.

Supply-Public Works

This is not merely a matter of importance to those people who happen to be citizens of Prince Edward Island, or even to those who happen to want to visit there to spend part of their summer on the beautiful beaches of that fair isle. It seems to me it is important to all the people of Canada to aid in the development of this province, rather than continuing in the tradition of handouts. It is important to aid in the development of those resources which are naturally there, which are those that can most adequately be built upon by aid from the federal government.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS
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