Gustave Benjamin BOYER

BOYER, The Hon. Gustave Benjamin

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
Vaudreuil--Soulanges (Quebec)
Birth Date
November 29, 1871
Deceased Date
December 2, 1927
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gustave_Benjamin_Boyer
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=4b02e0c1-1981-4162-963c-ca1a572cb6f1&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
gentleman, journalist

Parliamentary Career

November 3, 1904 - September 17, 1908
LIB
  Vaudreuil (Quebec)
October 26, 1908 - July 29, 1911
LIB
  Vaudreuil (Quebec)
September 21, 1911 - October 6, 1917
LIB
  Vaudreuil (Quebec)
December 17, 1917 - October 4, 1921
L LIB
  Vaudreuil--Soulanges (Quebec)
December 6, 1921 - September 5, 1925
LIB
  Vaudreuil--Soulanges (Quebec)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 1 of 28)


June 3, 1921

Mr. BOYER:

(Translation.) I see that

under this Bill, the Government will make the regulations which may be deemed necessary to avert this danger, and I think the measure is most timely and to the point. We have organized in Montreal, some seven or eight years ago, an association which bears the name of "La cooperative centrale." They have classified the products shipped to them and sold by them, and, Mr. Chairman, you could hardly imagine the good effects which this classification has had from an educational standpoint. "La Societe cooperative centrale" have established three different grades for the products shipped to them. At the outset, the small manufacturers, the factories badly equipped and those lacking in scruple wondered why their cheese was graded as second or third class. Whenever a complaint was made, inspectors were sent by "la cooperative" to the locality where that complaint originated and they would spend one, two or three weeks there if necessary in order to find out what was wrong and to show how the defects could be remedied. What was the result? Instead of 60 per cent of the manufacturers shipping inferior cheese, as was the case seven years ago, there are only this year 2 or 3 per cent of factories on the third grade list, 'in the province of Quebec. As you see, Mr. Chairman, this classification has been most useful; but it is only local in character and, therefore, insufficient to answer the general requirements.

The classification which was made by the Imperial Government during the war gave us a perfect idea of what could be expected from such a system. The Imperial Commission, which was independent of all groups, had classified the products shipped overseas in a perfect manner, and generally speaking, the results have been the very best to date. After the war, the Imperial Government decided to abolish that commission and we have reverted to the old methods of the past, from which we are now suffering, to a great extent,

by the fact that there is no classification process. So, when I happened to read on the Order Paper that the minister intended to introduce this Bill, I was glad of it and so were also the farming and dairy associations of the province of Quebec. Were it not for fear of treading upon dangerous ground, I would have this to add: Long before the province of Quebec, Ontario began to produce cheese, and improved it from year to year to such an extent that it was sold in England in much larger quantities than the Quebec cheese and became known as Ontario cheese. Later on, when we, from the province of Quebec, improved our own cheese and shipped it to the English market, we had to sell it under the guise of "Ontario cheese," which was unfair to Quebec while unprofitable to Ontario, for this province has no need of our cheese. If we wish to sell our cheese on the English market to-day as "Quebec cheese," the buyers in England will not give as high a price for it as they would for the "Ontario" or "Brockville" cheese. Nobody claims that our cheese is not as good as the other, but the buyers are accustomed to those brands and believe that others would not prove as satisfactory. The worst of it all is that inferior cheese, from whatever part of the country it comes, is shipped as "Quebec cheese." I protest most strongly against these methods. Now, if the Government decides to adopt a measure by which there will be three uniform grades of cheese, it will be equally just to all, everybody will be encouraged, and it will be to nobody's detriment.

Here is another point to be considered: The exporters, nowadays, are not all equally scrupulous., I have here several letters from exporters who are in favour of this measure. Now, a good many exporters rule the roost, and when I find that the Government is trying to put a check to such conditions, I am glad of it and I am satisfied that all who are interested in the dairy industry will feel thankful to the Government. Therefore, I shall vote for the Bill with pleasure, and I would ask the members from Quebec, especially those who represent rural counties, to realize the real usefulness of this Bill and to give it their full support.

Topic:   KEVISED EDITION. COMMONS
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June 3, 1921

Mr. BOYER:

(Translation.) Mr. Chairman, I approve this Bill with great pleasure because I sincerely believe it is a starting point from which legislation often being improved, will bring a great development to the dairying industry. When the Minister of Agriculture tells us that this Bill is wanted by every provincial minister of agriculture, I believe that statement, because I know from good authority that the Minister of Agriculture of Quebec was asked to work along those lines. It is some years ago that we tried to have a bill enacted for the grading of the dairy products, particularly butter and cheese to be exported, and that grading is timely. A short time ago, as director of the "Conseil National Laitier du Canada," I attended a meeting held in Toronto, when we passed a resolution supporting the measure that was then before Parliament. The "Societe de Pindustrie laitiere de la province de Quebec" has also for a long time been asking for such a grading. As far as Quebec is concerned, we have already appreciated, when the Imperial

Commission was in existence, the benefits of such a classification. I may say that at the present time the standard of our dairy products is not fixed by experts but merely by exporters; that grading being left to the most interested parties, this has been for a long time a great handicap to the farmers, and the Government is right in doing away with it.

Topic:   KEVISED EDITION. COMMONS
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April 25, 1921

Mr. BOYER:

I beg leave to withdraw the motion that appears in my name.

Motion withdrawn.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   TOBACCO LICENSES
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April 6, 1921

Mr. BOYER:

Has a translation been made of the volumes, published to date of "A Hisitory of the Organization, development and services of the Military and Naval Forces of Canada," edited by the General Staffs' Historical Section?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   WAR HISTORY
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March 14, 1921

1. What is the total number of pounds of butter exported outside of Canada, year by year, since 1910?

2. What is the value, year by year, of. the exportation since 1910?

3. What is the total number of pounds of cheese exported outside of Canada, year by year, since 19110?

4. What is the value, year by year, of such exportation since 1910?

5. To what countries were our cheese and butter exported, year by year, during said years, specifying the amount and value of each?

6. What Quantities of butter have been imported from various countries since 1910?

7. From what countries and what amount from each of them?

6. What quantities of butter have been imported from the various countries since 1910?

9. From what countries and what amount from each of them?

10. Under what brands or the names is our cheese and butter sold abroad?

11. What brands or names of butter and cheese do we import from abroad?

112. What is the quantity in pounds of margarine and its value in cash, or any other substitute to butter, manufactured in the country since 1916, year by year?

13. What is the quantity in pounds and value of such substitutes imported into Canada, year by year, since 1916?

14. Has the inobservance of the law regarding the process of manufacture and the sale of such substitutes, produced in Canada or purchased abroad, been the object of several actions?

15. If so, what is the number of same?

Topic:   QUESTIONS PASSED AS ORDERS FOR RETURNS
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